Virginia Morell

We are not alone in our ability to invent or plan or to contemplate ourselves—or even to plot and lie.
Deceptive acts require a complicated form of thinking, since you must be able to attribute intentions to the other person and predict that person’s behavior. One school of thought argues that human intelligence evolved partly because of the pressure of living in a complex society of calculating beings. Chimpanzees, orangutans, gorillas, and bonobos share this capacity with us. In the wild, primatologists have seen apes hide food from the alpha male or have sex behind his back.
Birds, too, can cheat. Laboratory studies show that western scrub jays can know another bird’s intentions and act on that knowledge. A jay that has stolen food itself, for example, knows that if another jay watches it hide a nut, there’s a chance the nut will be stolen. So the first jay will return to move the nut when the other jay is gone.

2 thoughts on “Virginia Morell

  1. shinichi Post author

    Minds of Their Own

    Animals are smarter than you think.

    by Virginia Morell

    National Geographic

    http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/03/animal-minds/virginia-morell-text

    In 1977 Irene Pepperberg, a recent graduate of Harvard University, did something very bold. At a time when animals still were considered automatons, she set out to find what was on another creature’s mind by talking to it. She brought a one-year-old African gray parrot she named Alex into her lab to teach him to reproduce the sounds of the English language. “I thought if he learned to communicate, I could ask him questions about how he sees the world.”

    When Pepperberg began her dialogue with Alex, who died last September at the age of 31, many scientists believed animals were incapable of any thought. They were simply machines, robots programmed to react to stimuli but lacking the ability to think or feel. Any pet owner would disagree. We see the love in our dogs’ eyes and know that, of course, Spot has thoughts and emotions. But such claims remain highly controversial. Gut instinct is not science, and it is all too easy to project human thoughts and feelings onto another creature. How, then, does a scientist prove that an animal is capable of thinking—that it is able to acquire information about the world and act on it?

    “That’s why I started my studies with Alex,” Pepperberg said. They were seated—she at her desk, he on top of his cage—in her lab, a windowless room about the size of a boxcar, at Brandeis University. Newspapers lined the floor; baskets of bright toys were stacked on the shelves. They were clearly a team—and because of their work, the notion that animals can think is no longer so fanciful.

    Certain skills are considered key signs of higher mental abilities: good memory, a grasp of grammar and symbols, self-awareness, understanding others’ motives, imitating others, and being creative. Bit by bit, in ingenious experiments, researchers have documented these talents in other species, gradually chipping away at what we thought made human beings distinctive while offering a glimpse of where our own abilities came from. Scrub jays know that other jays are thieves and that stashed food can spoil; sheep can recognize faces; chimpanzees use a variety of tools to probe termite mounds and even use weapons to hunt small mammals; dolphins can imitate human postures; the archerfish, which stuns insects with a sudden blast of water, can learn how to aim its squirt simply by watching an experienced fish perform the task. And Alex the parrot turned out to be a surprisingly good talker.

    Thirty years after the Alex studies began, Pepperberg and a changing collection of assistants were still giving him English lessons. The humans, along with two younger parrots, also served as Alex’s flock, providing the social input all parrots crave. Like any flock, this one—as small as it was—had its share of drama. Alex dominated his fellow parrots, acted huffy at times around Pepperberg, tolerated the other female humans, and fell to pieces over a male assistant who dropped by for a visit. (“If you were a man,” Pepperberg said, after noting Alex’s aloofness toward me, “he’d be on your shoulder in a second, barfing cashews in your ear.”)

    Pepperberg bought Alex in a Chicago pet store. She let the store’s assistant pick him out because she didn’t want other scientists saying later that she’d deliberately chosen an especially smart bird for her work. Given that Alex’s brain was the size of a shelled walnut, most researchers thought Pepperberg’s interspecies communication study would be futile.

    “Some people actually called me crazy for trying this,” she said. “Scientists thought that chimpanzees were better subjects, although, of course, chimps can’t speak.”

    Chimpanzees, bonobos, and gorillas have been taught to use sign language and symbols to communicate with us, often with impressive results. The bonobo Kanzi, for instance, carries his symbol-communication board with him so he can “talk” to his human researchers, and he has invented combinations of symbols to express his thoughts. Nevertheless, this is not the same thing as having an animal look up at you, open his mouth, and speak.

    Pepperberg walked to the back of the room, where Alex sat on top of his cage preening his pearl gray feathers. He stopped at her approach and opened his beak.

    “Want grape,” Alex said.

    “He hasn’t had his breakfast yet,” Pepperberg explained, “so he’s a little put out.”

    Alex returned to preening, while an assistant prepared a bowl of grapes, green beans, apple and banana slices, and corn on the cob.

    Under Pepperberg’s patient tutelage, Alex learned how to use his vocal tract to imitate almost one hundred English words, including the sounds for all of these foods, although he calls an apple a “banerry.”

    “Apples taste a little bit like bananas to him, and they look a little bit like cherries, so Alex made up that word for them,” Pepperberg said.

    Alex could count to six and was learning the sounds for seven and eight.

    “I’m sure he already knows both numbers,” Pepperberg said. “He’ll probably be able to count to ten, but he’s still learning to say the words. It takes far more time to teach him certain sounds than I ever imagined.”

    After breakfast, Alex preened again, keeping an eye on the flock. Every so often, he leaned forward and opened his beak: “Ssse… won.”

    “That’s good, Alex,” Pepperberg said. “Seven. The number is seven.”

    “Ssse… won! Se… won!”

    “He’s practicing,” she explained. “That’s how he learns. He’s thinking about how to say that word, how to use his vocal tract to make the correct sound.”

    It sounded a bit mad, the idea of a bird having lessons to practice, and willingly doing it. But after listening to and watching Alex, it was difficult to argue with Pepperberg’s explanation for his behaviors. She wasn’t handing him treats for the repetitious work or rapping him on the claws to make him say the sounds.

    “He has to hear the words over and over before he can correctly imitate them,” Pepperberg said, after pronouncing “seven” for Alex a good dozen times in a row. “I’m not trying to see if Alex can learn a human language,” she added. “That’s never been the point. My plan always was to use his imitative skills to get a better understanding of avian cognition.”

    In other words, because Alex was able to produce a close approximation of the sounds of some English words, Pepperberg could ask him questions about a bird’s basic understanding of the world. She couldn’t ask him what he was thinking about, but she could ask him about his knowledge of numbers, shapes, and colors. To demonstrate, Pepperberg carried Alex on her arm to a tall wooden perch in the middle of the room. She then retrieved a green key and a small green cup from a basket on a shelf. She held up the two items to Alex’s eye.

    “What’s same?” she asked.

    Without hesitation, Alex’s beak opened: “Co-lor.”

    “What’s different?” Pepperberg asked.

    “Shape,” Alex said. His voice had the digitized sound of a cartoon character. Since parrots lack lips (another reason it was difficult for Alex to pronounce some sounds, such as ba), the words seemed to come from the air around him, as if a ventriloquist were speaking. But the words—and what can only be called the thoughts—were entirely his.

    For the next 20 minutes, Alex ran through his tests, distinguishing colors, shapes, sizes, and materials (wool versus wood versus metal). He did some simple arithmetic, such as counting the yellow toy blocks among a pile of mixed hues.

    And, then, as if to offer final proof of the mind inside his bird’s brain, Alex spoke up. “Talk clearly!” he commanded, when one of the younger birds Pepperberg was also teaching mispronounced the word green. “Talk clearly!”

    “Don’t be a smart aleck,” Pepperberg said, shaking her head at him. “He knows all this, and he gets bored, so he interrupts the others, or he gives the wrong answer just to be obstinate. At this stage, he’s like a teenage son; he’s moody, and I’m never sure what he’ll do.”

    “Wanna go tree,” Alex said in a tiny voice.

    Alex had lived his entire life in captivity, but he knew that beyond the lab’s door, there was a hallway and a tall window framing a leafy elm tree. He liked to see the tree, so Pepperberg put her hand out for him to climb aboard. She walked him down the hall into the tree’s green light.

    “Good boy! Good birdie,” Alex said, bobbing on her hand.

    “Yes, you’re a good boy. You’re a good birdie.” And she kissed his feathered head.

    He was a good birdie until the end, and Pepperberg was happy to report that when he died he had finally mastered “seven.”

    Many of Alex’s cognitive skills, such as his ability to understand the concepts of same and different, are generally ascribed only to higher mammals, particularly primates. But parrots, like great apes (and humans), live a long time in complex societies. And like primates, these birds must keep track of the dynamics of changing relationships and environments.

    “They need to be able to distinguish colors to know when a fruit is ripe or unripe,” Pepperberg noted. “They need to categorize things—what’s edible, what isn’t—and to know the shapes of predators. And it helps to have a concept of numbers if you need to keep track of your flock, and to know who’s single and who’s paired up. For a long-lived bird, you can’t do all of this with instinct; cognition must be involved.”

    Being able mentally to divide the world into simple abstract categories would seem a valuable skill for many organisms. Is that ability, then, part of the evolutionary drive that led to human intelligence?

    Charles Darwin, who attempted to explain how human intelligence developed, extended his theory of evolution to the human brain: Like the rest of our physiology, intelligence must have evolved from simpler organisms, since all animals face the same general challenges of life. They need to find mates, food, and a path through the woods, sea, or sky—tasks that Darwin argued require problem-solving and categorizing abilities. Indeed, Darwin went so far as to suggest that earthworms are cognitive beings because, based on his close observations, they have to make judgments about the kinds of leafy matter they use to block their tunnels. He hadn’t expected to find thinking invertebrates and remarked that the hint of earthworm intelligence “has surprised me more than anything else in regard to worms.”

    To Darwin, the earthworm discovery demonstrated that degrees of intelligence could be found throughout the animal kingdom. But the Darwinian approach to animal intelligence was cast aside in the early 20th century, when researchers decided that field observations were simply “anecdotes,” usually tainted by anthropomorphism. In an effort to be more rigorous, many embraced behaviorism, which regarded animals as little more than machines, and focused their studies on the laboratory white rat—since one “machine” would behave like any other.

    But if animals are simply machines, how can the appearance of human intelligence be explained? Without Darwin’s evolutionary perspective, the greater cognitive skills of people did not make sense biologically. Slowly the pendulum has swung away from the animal-as-machine model and back toward Darwin. A whole range of animal studies now suggest that the roots of cognition are deep, widespread, and highly malleable.

    Just how easily new mental skills can evolve is perhaps best illustrated by dogs. Most owners talk to their dogs and expect them to understand. But this canine talent wasn’t fully appreciated until a border collie named Rico appeared on a German TV game show in 2001. Rico knew the names of some 200 toys and acquired the names of new ones with ease.

    Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig heard about Rico and arranged a meeting with him and his owners. That led to a scientific report revealing Rico’s uncanny language ability: He could learn and remember words as quickly as a toddler. Other scientists had shown that two-year-old children—who acquire around ten new words a day—have an innate set of principles that guides this task. The ability is seen as one of the key building blocks in language acquisition. The Max Planck scientists suspect that the same principles guide Rico’s word learning, and that the technique he uses for learning words is identical to that of humans.

    To find more examples, the scientists read all the letters from hundreds of people claiming that their dogs had Rico’s talent. In fact, only two—both border collies—had comparable skills. One of them—the researchers call her Betsy—has a vocabulary of more than 300 words.

    “Even our closest relatives, the great apes, can’t do what Betsy can do—hear a word only once or twice and know that the acoustic pattern stands for something,” said Juliane Kaminski, a cognitive psychologist who worked with Rico and is now studying Betsy. She and her colleague Sebastian Tempelmann had come to Betsy’s home in Vienna to give her a fresh battery of tests. Kaminski petted Betsy, while Tempelmann set up a video camera.

    “Dogs’ understanding of human forms of communication is something new that has evolved,” Kaminski said, “something that’s developed in them because of their long association with humans.” Although Kaminski has not yet tested wolves, she doubts they have this language skill. “Maybe these collies are especially good at it because they’re working dogs and highly motivated, and in their traditional herding jobs, they must listen very closely to their owners.”

    Scientists think that dogs were domesticated about 15,000 years ago, a relatively short time in which to evolve language skills. But how similar are these skills to those of humans? For abstract thinking, we employ symbols, letting one thing stand for another. Kaminski and Tempelmann were testing whether dogs can do this too.

    Betsy’s owner—whose pseudonym is Schaefer—summoned Betsy, who obediently stretched out at Schaefer’s feet, eyes fixed on her face. Whenever Schaefer spoke, Betsy attentively cocked her head from side to side.

    Kaminski handed Schaefer a stack of color photographs and asked her to choose one. Each image depicted a dog’s toy against a white background—toys Betsy had never seen before. They weren’t actual toys; they were only images of toys. Could Betsy connect a two-dimensional picture to a three-dimensional object?

    Schaefer held up a picture of a fuzzy, rainbow-colored Frisbee and urged Betsy to find it. Betsy studied the photograph and Schaefer’s face, then ran into the kitchen, where the Frisbee was placed among three other toys and photographs of each toy. Betsy brought either the Frisbee or the photograph of the Frisbee to Schaefer every time.

    “It wouldn’t have been wrong if she’d just brought the photograph,” Kaminski said. “But I think Betsy can use a picture, without a name, to find an object. Still, it will take many more tests to prove this.”

    Even then, Kaminski is unsure that other scientists will ever accept her discovery because Betsy’s abstract skill, as minor as it may seem to us, may tread all too closely to human thinking.

    Still, we remain the inventive species. No other animal has built skyscrapers, written sonnets, or made a computer. Yet animal researchers say that creativity, like other forms of intelligence, did not simply spring from nothingness. It, too, has evolved.

    “People were surprised to discover that chimpanzees make tools,” said Alex Kacelnik, a behavioral ecologist at Oxford University, referring to the straws and sticks chimpanzees shape to pull termites from their nests. “But people also thought, ‘Well, they share our ancestry—of course they’re smart.’ Now we’re finding these kinds of exceptional behaviors in some species of birds. But we don’t have a recently shared ancestry with birds. Their evolutionary history is very different; our last common ancestor with all birds was a reptile that lived over 300 million years ago.

    “This is not trivial,” Kacelnik continued. “It means that evolution can invent similar forms of advanced intelligence more than once—that it’s not something reserved only for primates or mammals.”

    Kacelnik and his colleagues are studying one of these smart species, the New Caledonian crow, which lives in the forests of that Pacific island. New Caledonian crows are among the most skilled of tool-making and tool-using birds, forming probes and hooks from sticks and leaf stems to poke into the crowns of the palm trees, where fat grubs hide. Since these birds, like chimpanzees, make and use tools, researchers can look for similarities in the evolutionary processes that shaped their brains. Something about the environments of both species favored the evolution of tool-making neural powers.

    But is their use of tools rigid and limited, or can they be inventive? Do they have what researchers call mental flexibility? Chimpanzees certainly do. In the wild, a chimpanzee may use four sticks of different sizes to extract the honey from a bee’s nest. And in captivity, they can figure out how to position several boxes so they can retrieve a banana hanging from a rope.

    Answering that question for New Caledonian crows—extremely shy birds—wasn’t easy. Even after years of observing them in the wild, researchers couldn’t determine if the birds’ ability was innate, or if they learned to make and use their tools by watching one another. If it was a genetically inherited skill, could they, like the chimps, use their talent in different, creative ways?

    To find out, Kacelnik and his students brought 23 crows of varying ages (all but one caught in the wild) to the aviary in his Oxford lab and let them mate. Four hatchlings were raised in captivity, and all were carefully kept away from the adults, so they had no opportunity to be taught about tools. Yet soon after they fledged, all picked up sticks to probe busily into cracks and shaped different materials into tools. “So we know that at least the bases of tool use are inherited,” Kacelnik said. “And now the question is, what else can they do with tools?”

    Plenty. In his office, Kacelnik played a video of a test he’d done with one of the wild-caught crows, Betty, who had died recently from an infection. In the film, Betty flies into a room. She’s a glossy-black bird with a crow’s bright, inquisitive eyes, and she immediately spies the test before her: a glass tube with a tiny basket lodged in its center. The basket holds a bit of meat. The scientists had placed two pieces of wire in the room. One was bent into a hook, the other was straight. They figured Betty would choose the hook to lift the basket by its handle.

    But experiments don’t always go according to plan. Another crow had stolen the hook before Betty could find it. Betty is undeterred. She looks at the meat in the basket, then spots the straight piece of wire. She picks it up with her beak, pushes one end into a crack in the floor, and uses her beak to bend the other end into a hook. Thus armed, she lifts the basket out of the tube.

    “This was the first time Betty had ever seen a piece of wire like this,” Kacelnik said. “But she knew she could use it to make a hook and exactly where she needed to bend it to make the size she needed.”

    They gave Betty other tests, each requiring a slightly different solution, such as making a hook out of a flat piece of aluminum rather than a wire. Each time, Betty invented a new tool and solved the problem. “It means she had a mental representation of what it was she wanted to make. Now that,” Kacelnik said, “is a major kind of cognitive sophistication.”

    This is the larger lesson of animal cognition research: It humbles us. We are not alone in our ability to invent or plan or to contemplate ourselves—or even to plot and lie.

    Deceptive acts require a complicated form of thinking, since you must be able to attribute intentions to the other person and predict that person’s behavior. One school of thought argues that human intelligence evolved partly because of the pressure of living in a complex society of calculating beings. Chimpanzees, orangutans, gorillas, and bonobos share this capacity with us. In the wild, primatologists have seen apes hide food from the alpha male or have sex behind his back.

    Birds, too, can cheat. Laboratory studies show that western scrub jays can know another bird’s intentions and act on that knowledge. A jay that has stolen food itself, for example, knows that if another jay watches it hide a nut, there’s a chance the nut will be stolen. So the first jay will return to move the nut when the other jay is gone.

    “It’s some of the best evidence so far of experience projection in another species,” said Nicky Clayton in her aviary lab at Cambridge University. “I would describe it as, ‘I know that you know where I have hidden my stash of food, and if I were in your shoes I’d steal it, so I’m going to move my stash to a place you don’t know about.’”

    This study, by Clayton and her colleague Nathan Emery, is the first to show the kind of ecological pressures, such as the need to hide food for winter use, that would lead to the evolution of such mental abilities. Most provocatively, her research demonstrates that some birds possess what is often considered another uniquely human skill: the ability to recall a specific past event. Scrub jays, for example, seem to know how long ago they cached a particular kind of food, and they manage to retrieve it before it spoils.

    Human cognitive psychologists call this kind of memory “episodic memory” and argue that it can exist only in a species that can mentally travel back in time. Despite Clayton’s studies, some refuse to concede this ability to the jays. “Animals are stuck in time,” explained Sara Shettleworth, a comparative psychologist at the University of Toronto in Canada, meaning that they don’t distinguish among past, present, and future the way humans do. Since animals lack language, she said, they probably also lack “the extra layer of imagination and explanation” that provides the running mental narrative accompanying our actions.

    Such skepticism is a challenge for Clayton. “We have good evidence that the jays remember the what, where, and when of specific caching events, which is the original definition of episodic memory. But now the goalposts have moved.” It’s a common complaint among animal researchers. Whenever they find a mental skill in a species that is reminiscent of a special human ability, the human cognition scientists change the definition. But the animal researchers may underestimate their power—it is their discoveries that compel the human side to shore up the divide.

    “Sometimes the human cognitive psychologists can be so fixed on their definitions that they forget how fabulous these animal discoveries are,” said Clive Wynne of the University of Florida, who has studied cognition in pigeons and marsupials. “We’re glimpsing intelligence throughout the animal kingdom, which is what we should expect. It’s a bush, not a single-trunk tree with a line leading only to us.”

    Some of the branches on that bush have led to such degrees of intelligence that we should blush for ever having thought any animal a mere machine.

    In the late 1960s a cognitive psychologist named Louis Herman began investigating the cognitive abilities of bottlenose dolphins. Like humans, dolphins are highly social and cosmopolitan, living in subpolar to tropical environments worldwide; they’re highly vocal; and they have special sensory skills, such as echolocation. By the 1980s Herman’s cognitive studies were focused on a group of four young dolphins—Akeakamai, Phoenix, Elele, and Hiapo—at the Kewalo Basin Marine Mammal Laboratory in Hawaii. The dolphins were curious and playful, and they transferred their sociability to Herman and his students.

    “In our work with the dolphins, we had a guiding philosophy,” Herman says, “that we could bring out the full flower of their intellect, just as educators try to bring out the full potential of a human child. Dolphins have these big, highly complex brains. My thought was, ‘OK, so you have this pretty brain. Let’s see what you can do with it.’”

    To communicate with the dolphins, Herman and his team invented a hand- and arm-signal language, complete with a simple grammar. For instance, a pumping motion of the closed fists meant “hoop,” and both arms extended overhead (as in jumping jacks) meant “ball.” A “come here” gesture with a single arm told them to “fetch.” Responding to the request “hoop, ball, fetch,” Akeakamai would push the ball to the hoop. But if the word order was changed to “ball, hoop, fetch,” she would carry the hoop to the ball. Over time she could interpret more grammatically complex requests, such as “right, basket, left, Frisbee, in,” asking that she put the Frisbee on her left in the basket on her right. Reversing “left” and “right” in the instruction would reverse Akeakamai’s actions. Akeakamai could complete such requests the first time they were made, showing a deep understanding of the grammar of the language.

    “They’re a very vocal species,” Herman adds. “Our studies showed that they could imitate arbitrary sounds that we broadcast into their tank, an ability that may be tied to their own need to communicate. I’m not saying they have a dolphin language. But they are capable of understanding the novel instructions that we convey to them in a tutored language; their brains have that ability.

    “There are many things they could do that people have always doubted about animals. For example, they correctly interpreted, on the very first occasion, gestured instructions given by a person displayed on a TV screen behind an underwater window. They recognized that television images were representations of the real world that could be acted on in the same way as in the real world.”

    They readily imitated motor behaviors of their instructors too. If a trainer bent backward and lifted a leg, dolphin would turn on its back and lift its tail in the air. Although imitation was once regarded as a simpleminded skill, in recent years cognitive scientists have revealed that it’s extremely difficult, requiring the imitator to form a mental image of the other person’s body and pose, then adjust his own body parts into the same position—actions that imply an awareness of one’s self.

    “Here’s Elele,” Herman says, showing a film of her following a trainer’s directions. “Surfboard, dorsal fin, touch.” Instantly Elele swam to the board and, leaning to one side, gently laid her dorsal fin on it, an untrained behavior. The trainer stretched her arms straight up, signaling “Hooray!” and Elele leaped into the air, squeaking and clicking with delight.

    “Elele just loved to be right,” Herman said. “And she loved inventing things. We made up a sign for ‘create,’ which asked a dolphin to create its own behavior.”

    Dolphins often synchronize their movements in the wild, such as leaping and diving side by side, but scientists don’t know what signal they use to stay so tightly coordinated. Herman thought he might be able to tease out the technique with his pupils. In the film, Akeakamai and Phoenix are asked to create a trick and do it together. The two dolphins swim away from the side of the pool, circle together underwater for about ten seconds, then leap out of the water, spinning clockwise on their long axis and squirting water from their mouths, every maneuver done at the same instant. “None of this was trained,” Herman says, “and it looks to us absolutely mysterious. We don’t know how they do it—or did it.”

    He never will. Akeakamai and Phoenix and the two others died accidentally four years ago. Through these dolphins, he made some of the most extraordinary breakthroughs ever in understanding another species’ mind—a species that even Herman describes as “alien,” given its aquatic life and the fact that dolphins and primates diverged millions of years ago. “That kind of cognitive convergence suggests there must be some similar pressures selecting for intellect,” Herman said. “We don’t share their biology or ecology. That leaves social similarities—the need to establish relationships and alliances superimposed on a lengthy period of maternal care and longevity—as the likely common driving force.”

    “I loved our dolphins,” Herman says, “as I’m sure you love your pets. But it was more than that, more than the love you have for a pet. The dolphins were our colleagues. That’s the only word that fits. They were our partners in this research, guiding us into all the capabilities of their minds. When they died, it was like losing our children.”

    Herman pulled a photograph from his file. In it, he is in the pool with Phoenix, who rests her head on his shoulder. He is smiling and reaching back to embrace her. She is sleek and silvery with appealingly large eyes, and she looks to be smiling too, as dolphins always do. It’s an image of love between two beings. In that pool, at least for that moment, there was clearly a meeting of the minds.

    Reply
  2. shinichi Post author

    動物の知力

    by バージニア・モレル

    ナショナルジオグラフィック日本語版 2008年3月号

    http://natgeo.nikkeibp.co.jp/nng/magazine/0803/feature01/index.shtml
    http://natgeo.nikkeibp.co.jp/nng/magazine/0803/feature01/_02.shtml
    http://natgeo.nikkeibp.co.jp/nng/magazine/0803/feature01/_03.shtml
    http://natgeo.nikkeibp.co.jp/nng/magazine/0803/feature01/_04.shtml
    http://natgeo.nikkeibp.co.jp/nng/magazine/0803/feature01/_05.shtml
    http://natgeo.nikkeibp.co.jp/nng/magazine/0803/feature01/_06.shtml
    http://natgeo.nikkeibp.co.jp/nng/magazine/0803/feature01/_07.shtml

    人間の言葉を話す、仲間をだます、道具を考え出す――。動物たちは、私たちの想像を超えた知力をもっている。科学者が動物と二人三脚で続けてきた数々の研究で、その実力が少しずつ明らかになってきた。

     動物に心の内を直接聞いてみたい―。1977年、大学を出たばかりの研究者アイリーン・ペパーバーグは、こう考えて大胆な実験を始めた。彼女は1歳のヨウム(オウムの一種)を研究室に持ち込み、アレックスと名づけて、人間の言葉を教えることにしたのだ。「意思疎通ができるようになれば、鳥がどんなふうに世界を見ているか、話を聞けると思ったんです」

     ペパーバーグが実験を始めた当時、多くの科学者は、動物に考える力などないと思っていた。ロボットと同じように決まりきった反応しかせず、思考や感情とは縁がないと決めつけていたのである。

     いや、うちの犬は違いますよ、と言う人もいるだろう。だが、そんな主張はなかなか通らない。動物に思考力がある、言い換えれば、まわりから得た情報をもとに行動する能力があると科学的に実証するには、どうすればよいのか。

     「そのために、アレックスに協力を仰いだわけです」とペパーバーグ。アレックスは2007年9月に31歳で生涯を閉じたが、私が研究室を訪ねたときはまだ元気だった。ドアを開けると、ペパーバーグはデスクに向かい、アレックスは鳥かごの上に陣どっていた。床には新聞が並び、棚には色とりどりのおもちゃを入れたかごが積みあげられている。アレックスは実験対象というよりも、研究のパートナーのように見えた。

     記憶する、文法や絵文字を理解する、自意識をもつ、他者の思惑を推察する、動作や行動をまねる、何かを創り出す―こうした能力は、高度な知能をもつことを示す重要な指標とみなされている。さまざまな実験を通じて、動物たちにもこのような能力があることが、少しずつ明らかになってきた。

     たとえば、アメリカカケスは、隠した食べ物が盗まれないように策を講じる。ヒツジは仲間の顔を見分けられる。チンパンジーは道具でアリを釣りあげる。イルカは人間のポーズをまねる。ペパーバーグの相棒、アレックスはどうかと言えば、おしゃべりが得意だ。

     アレックスの英語学習歴は長く、ペパーバーグと代々の研究助手が30年にわたって指導してきた。ヨウムは集団で生活するので、仲間との交流が欠かせない。アレックスにとっては、研究スタッフが仲間のようなものだが、本物の鳥の仲間として、若いヨウムも2羽飼われている。

     ペパーバーグはアレックスをシカゴのペット店で買った。後でほかの研究者に「どうせ天才ヨウムを選んだのだろう」と言われたくはなかったので、鳥選びは店員に任せた。ヨウムの脳は、クルミの実ほどの大きさしかない。言葉を教え、考えを聞き出そうとしても、ただの徒労に終わるだろうと、大半の研究仲間は高をくくっていた。

     手話や絵文字(シンボル)を使って動物とコミュニケーションをとる研究は、これまでにもチンパンジーやボノボ(ピグミーチンパンジー)、ゴリラといった類人猿を対象に行われ、多くはめざましい成果を挙げている。たとえば、カンジと名づけられたボノボは、多数の絵文字を使って、研究者と“会話”する。会話といっても、カンジの場合は相手の顔を見て、口を開き、言葉を発するわけではない。ペパーバーグはそれを鳥にやらせようというのだ。

    アレックスの英語学習法

     ペパーバーグが席を立って鳥かごに近づくと、アレックスはくちばしを開けた。

     「ブドウ、ホシイ」

      「まだ朝食をあげてないので、ちょっとご機嫌ななめなんです」とペパーバーグ。

     助手がブドウとサヤインゲン、薄切りにしたリンゴとバナナ、トウモロコシを容器に入れた。

     忍耐強い指導のかいあって、アレックスは発声器官である鳴管を使って、100語近い英単語を発音できるようになった。朝食に出された食べ物の名前もすべて言えるが、リンゴのことは「バネリー」と呼ぶ。

     「味はバナナっぽくて、見た目はちょっとチェリーみたいな果物―そんな意味で、アレックスが考えた造語なんです」

     数も1から6まで数えられるようになり、今は7と8を練習中だという。

     「7も8も、もうわかっていると思います。たぶんもう10までは数えられるでしょうが、発音はまだ練習中なんです。音によっては、教えるのにかなり時間がかかるものもあるんです」

     朝食がすんでも、アレックスはときどき身を乗り出すようにして、くちばしを開け、声を上げていた。「ス、ス、セ……ウン」

     「よくできたわ、アレックス」。ペパーバーグがほめる。「セブン。その数はセブンよ」

      「ス、ス、セ……ウン! セ……ウン!」

      「鳴管をどう使ったら正しい音が出せるか考えながら、自分で練習しているんです」

     鳥が人間の言葉の手ほどきを受け、その上、自主的に練習もするなどと言われても、ちょっと信じられないかもしれない。だが、アレックスという実例を目のあたりにし、その声に耳を傾ければ、納得がいく。ご褒美の餌をもらえるわけでも、かぎ爪をたたかれて強制されるわけでもない。それでも、あくまで自分から繰り返し音をまねようとする。

     ペパーバーグは、アレックスにセブンという言葉を何十回も言って聞かせた。「繰り返し聞いて初めて、正確にまねできるようになるんです。私たちは、アレックスが人間の言葉を覚えられるかどうかを調べようとしているわけではありません。言葉をまねる能力を利用して、鳥のもつ認知能力を探りたい。当初からそれが狙いでした」

    動物の認知能力を探る

     鳥が世界をどう見ているか、初歩的な質問をする準備は整った。アレックスにいきなり、何を考えているのか聞くのは無理でも、数や形、色の識別についての問答ならできる。ペパーバーグは実際にやってくれた。まず、棚のかごから緑の鍵と緑の小さなカップを出し、アレックスに見せて聞く。

     「何が同じ?」

     アレックスは迷わずにくちばしを開けた。

     「イ、ロ」

      「何が違う?」

      「カタチ」

     続く20分間、アレックスは色や形、大きさや材質(木材、金属、ウールなど)の違いを見分けるテストを次々に受けた。さまざまな色の積み木の中に黄色いものが何個あるかを数えるなど、簡単な数の勘定もできた。

     そればかりか、英語のレッスンを受けていた別の若いヨウムが「グリーン」という単語の発音をまちがえたのを聞きつけ、大声で「ハッキリ、ハナセ!」と言ったのだ。僕だっていろいろ考えている。そう言いたいかのようだ。

     「生意気なこと言っちゃだめ」と、ペパーバーグは首を振ってたしなめた。「アレックスは今やっていることは全部わかっているので、退屈してよそに口をはさむんです。わざとまちがった答えを言って困らせることもあります」

     「キ、イキタイ」。アレックスがぽつりと小声で言った。アレックスは生まれてこのかた、ずっと室内で暮らしてきた。だが、研究室のドアの向こうにニレの木があるのを知っていて、その木を見ると機嫌がよくなるのだった。ペパーバーグは手を差し出して、アレックスをその上にとまらせ、廊下に出て、木漏れ日の差し込む窓辺に向かった。

     「イイコ。イイトリ」。アレックスはペパーバーグの手の上でうなずくように首を動かした。

     「そうね、あなたはいい子よ。いい鳥よ」。ペパーバーグは小さな頭にキスをした。

     アレックスは最後までいい子だった。死ぬ前にとうとう「セブン」の発音を習得したと、ペパーバーグは誇らしげに報告してくれた。

     「同じ」と「違う」の意味がわかるなど、アレックスが示した認知能力の多くは、一般には高等な哺乳類、とりわけ霊長類だけがもつものと考えられている。だがオウムも、複雑な社会集団の中で暮らす動物だ。仲間との関係やまわりの環境は絶えず変わる。変化への対応を迫られるのは、鳥類も霊長類も同じだろう。

     「果実の熟し具合を見分けるには、色を識別できないといけません。姿かたちから、天敵を察知する必要もあります」と、ペパーバーグは説明する。「色や形がわかり、数の概念が芽生えてくれば、群れの現状を把握できます。交尾の相手がいる鳥といない鳥を区別するのにも役立ちます。長生きする鳥は、本能だけでこうした判断をして生きていくのは無理です。認知能力が必要になってくるはずです」

      周囲の事象を心の中で抽象的な概念にグループ分けする能力は、動物にとっても重要であるはずだ。人間の知能も、その延長線上にあるものだろうか。ダーウィンは進化論を人間の脳にも当てはめて、人間の知能の発達過程を説明しようとした。人間の心理や知能は、より原始的な生物のもつ能力から進化してきたはずだ。どの動物も、生きていく中で同じ課題に直面するからだ。

     ダーウィンはミミズを観察して、どの動物にも知能の萌芽のようなものがあるのではないかと考えた。しかし、20世紀初めには、こんな考えは相手にされなかった。多くの研究者は、動物を機械のようにみなす行動主義の立場をとり、マウスを使った室内実験に没頭した。

     だが、動物が刺激に反応する機械にすぎないなら、人間の知能はどのようにして誕生したのか。人間がすぐれた認知能力を獲得した過程を生物学の見地からきちんと説明するのは、進化論的な視点抜きでは不可能だ。時代の流れは、“動物=機械”説からダーウィンの進化論へと徐々に移っていった。そしてさまざまな動物の研究から、認知能力の起源は非常に古く、多種多様であることがわかってきた。

    犬の言語能力を見る

     新たな知的能力は、進化の過程で意外にたやすく生まれる。それを端的に示すのが、犬の言語能力だ。たいていの飼い主は、言葉が通じていると思って犬に話しかけている。

     犬の言語能力が大きく注目されるようになったのは、ドイツのテレビ番組に、ある天才犬が登場してからだ。その犬、ボーダーコリーのリコは、ざっと200種類のおもちゃの名前を記憶し、新しい名前も難なく覚える。

     ライプチヒにあるマックス・プランク進化人類学研究所の研究チームが、リコの話を聞きつけて飼い主に連絡をとり、言語能力を検証した。発表された論文によれば、リコは人間の幼児のように次々に言葉を学び、記憶するという。人間の2歳児は1日に新しい単語を10語ほど覚えるが、別の研究によれば、この能力は言語の習得に必須な要素の一つとして、生まれつき幼児の脳に備わっているものだという。研究チームは、犬のリコも同じようなメカニズムで言葉を覚えるのではないかと考えている。

     研究チームのもとには、わが家の犬も言葉がわかるという手紙が多数寄せられた。だが、リコと同程度の能力が認められたのは2頭だけで、いずれもボーダーコリーだった。うち1頭、ベッツィと呼ばれている犬は、300語あまりの単語を覚えている。

     「人間に一番近いはずの大型類人猿も、ベッツィにはかないません。ベッツィはある言葉を1度か2度聞けば、それが何かを表す単語だとわかってしまいます」と、認知心理学者のジュリアン・カミンスキーは言う。「人間のコミュニケーション様式を理解するという犬の能力はまだ新しく、人間との長い付き合いの中で生まれました。ボーダーコリーは昔から牧羊犬の役目を果たすために、飼い主の言葉に耳を傾ける必要がありました。だから言語能力が発達したのでしょう」

     犬が人間に飼われるようになったのは、約1万5000年前と考えられている。言語能力を進化させるには、比較的短い時間だ。では、犬の言語能力は、どれくらい人間に近いのだろうか。人間が抽象的な思考をするときは、言語などを介し、ものごとをいったん記号化する。カミンスキーらは、犬にもこうした抽象化ができるかどうかを調べるため、ベッツィの飼い主のシェーファー(仮名)に協力してもらって実験をしてみた。

     シェーファーは何枚かのカラー写真を渡された。どの写真も白い背景に、ベッツィが見たことのない犬用のおもちゃが写っている。シェーファーはその中の1枚、カラフルなフリスビーの写真をベッツィに見せ、実物を見つけてくるよう指示した。別室の台所には、フリスビーのほか3個のおもちゃと、それぞれの写真が置いてある。はたして二次元の写真と三次元の物体を結びつけられるだろうか。

     ベッツィは台所に走っていき、フリスビーをとって帰ってきた。何回テストしても、フリスビーかその写真をとってきた。「ベッツィは、写真を見るだけで物を見つけられるようです。ただし、もっとテストを重ねないと、断定はできません」とカミンスキーは解説する。

     写真と実物を結びつけるのは一見難しくなさそうだが、実は抽象的な思考ができる有力な証拠だ。ベッツィにその能力があるとなれば、人間にしかできないと思われていた高度な思考が、動物にもできることになる。

     では、発明し、創造する能力は人間だけのものなのか。高層ビルを建てたり、詩を書いたり、コンピューターを作る動物はいない。だが、創造性も進化の産物で、無から生じたわけではないことが、動物の研究からわかってきた。

     「チンパンジーが道具を作るとわかったとき、人々は驚きました」と、行動生態学者のアレックス・カチェルニクは話す。チンパンジーは、アリ塚からアリを取り出すのに、ワラや小枝を加工した道具を使う。「それでも、人間と共通の祖先をもつチンパンジーが賢いのは当然だろうと、誰もが考えました。ところが、一部の鳥類にも、こうした行動がみられることがわかってきたのです。鳥と人間の共通の祖先は、最新でも3億年以上前にいた爬虫類だというのに」

     カチェルニクは続ける。「これはとても重要です。進化の歴史の中で、似たような高度な知能が、別々の系統に出現したことを意味するからです。もはや、霊長類や哺乳類だけが特別だとは言えなくなりました」

    ニューカレドニアカラスは釣り名人

     カチェルニクらは、こうした賢い鳥の一種、ニューカレドニアカラスを調べている。道具を作ったり使ったりする鳥の中でも、このカラスは特にすぐれた技術をもつ。小枝や葉っぱの軸を加工して、ヤシの木のてっぺんから差し込み、中に潜む大きな虫を釣りあげるのだ。

     ニューカレドニアカラスには、道具を単に使うだけでなく新たな工夫を加える能力、研究者が言うところの「知的柔軟性」があるのだろうか。ちなみに野生のチンパンジーは、大きさの違う4本の小枝を使い分けて、ハチの巣から蜂蜜をすくい出すという。

     このカラスは人に対する警戒心がとても強いので、答えを出すのは容易でない。野外での観察は何年も続けられているが、いまだに結論は出ていない。道具を作ったり使ったりする能力は、もともと備わっているのか。それとも、仲間の行動をまねて学習するものなのか。遺伝的な能力だとすれば、チンパンジーと同様、能力を柔軟に使いこなせるのだろうか。

     答えを求めて、カチェルニクは学生たちとともに、23羽のカラスを飼ってみた。4羽いたヒナはみんな、成鳥から厳重に隔離されたため、道具の使い方を教わる機会はなかった。それでも、成鳥になると、例外なく小枝を拾い、木の穴を探ったり、いろいろな材料を加工して幼虫釣りに使うようになった。「これで、道具を使う能力の土台は遺伝的なものだとわかりました」とカチェルニクは言う。「となると次の問題は、道具で別のことができるかどうかです」

     カチェルニクは、ニューカレドニアカラスのベティを撮った実験のビデオを見せてくれた。ベティは野生から捕獲されてきたカラスで、先日、残念ながら感染症で死んでしまった。実験では、ガラスの筒の中に肉片を入れた小さなかごを置き、室内の別の場所に針金を2本置いた。1本は先端が釣り針状に曲がったもの、もう1本はまっすぐな針金だ。事前の予想では、ベティは釣り針状の針金をかごの持ち手に引っかけて、かごを釣りあげると考えられた。

     だが、予想外の出来事が起きた。別のカラスが、先に釣り針状の針金を持ち去ってしまったのだ。ベティはかごの中の肉を見てから、まっすぐな針金に目をとめた。針金をくわえると、一方の端を床の割れ目に突っ込んで固定し、他方をくちばしで曲げて釣り針状にした。それを使って、みごとかごを釣りあげたのである。

    仲間をだますカケス

     動物の認知能力の研究を見ていると、私たちはおのずと謙虚になる。創造したり、計画したり、自分を見つめたり、さらには策を弄して他者をだましたりするのは、人間だけに与えられた能力ではないのだ。

     他者をだますには、複雑な思考が必要になる。相手の思惑を推察し、どういう行動をとるかを事前に予測しなければならないからだ。チンパンジーやオランウータン、ゴリラ、ボノボには、人間と同じく、こうした能力がある。野生の群れの調査では、リーダー格の雄に気づかれないよう、ほかの雄や雌がこっそり食べ物を隠したり、交尾したりするといった行動が観察されている。

     仲間をだます能力は、鳥にもある。たとえば、アメリカカケスが仲間の意図を見抜き、その情報をもとに行動することが実験でわかっている。食べ物を盗んだことのあるカケスは、木の実を隠しているところを仲間に見られたら、後でこっそり戻ってきて隠し場所を変えておく。

     「自分の経験から他者の意図を推察する能力は、動物にもあるんです。私たちは実験で、それをはっきりと裏づけました」と、英国ケンブリッジ大学のニッキー・クレイトンは話す。

     クレイトンと共同研究者のネイサン・エメリーはこの研究を通じて、知的能力の進化の裏には生存のための必要性があることを初めて示した。冬に備えて食べ物を隠さなければならないといった必要性が、だます能力などを進化させるというのだ。また、過去の出来事を思い出す能力が鳥にあるとも報告している。たとえば、カケスは食べ物を隠した時期を覚えているらしく、腐る前に隠し場所から取り出すという。

     人間を対象にした認知心理学では、こうした記憶は「エピソード記憶」と呼ばれ、過去の出来事を思い出せる種だけに備わった能力とされている。一部の研究者は、カケスにこんな能力があるはずがないとして、クレイトンの研究を認めようとしない。「動物は(現在という)時間に縛られているものです」と、比較心理学者のセーラ・シェトルワースは主張する。人間のように、過去、現在、未来を区別できないというのだ。

     こうした懐疑的な見方に対抗するには、もっと説得力のある証拠が必要だ。「エピソード記憶のもともとの定義は、何が、いつ、どこで起きたかを覚えていることです。そこで私たちは、カケスがいつ、どこで、どんな食べ物を隠したかを覚えているという明確な証拠を示しました。すると、認知心理学者たちはさらにハードルを高くしたのです」

     同様のいらだちは、動物の研究者の多くが感じている。人間特有の能力と似たような知的能力が動物にもあると主張すると、そのたびに認知心理学者たちが能力の定義を変えてしまうのだ。

    イルカとの心の交流

     1960年代の後半、認知心理学者のルイス・ハーマンが、ハンドウイルカの認知能力を研究し始めた。

     人間と同様、イルカは仲間との交流が活発で、極地付近から熱帯地方まで広く生息する、行動範囲の広い動物だ。仲間同士でさかんにコミュニケーションをとり、音波を使って物体の位置や形を知る能力をもつ。1980年代には、ハーマンの認知研究の対象は、ハワイのケワロ湾海洋哺乳類研究所にいる4頭の若いイルカ、アケアカマイ、フェニックス、エレレ、ヒアポに絞られた。4頭は好奇心旺盛で、遊びが大好き。社交性も豊かで、ハーマンや学生たちにもよくなついた。

     「私たちの研究には、指針となる哲学がありました」とハーマンは話す。「教育者が子どもの潜在能力を100%開花させようとするように、イルカの知的能力をすべて引き出そうというものです。イルカは大きくて非常に複雑な脳をもっています。『きみたちには、すばらしい脳がある。それで何ができるか、ちょっとやってみよう』。そんな調子で研究を始めたんです」

     イルカと対話するために、簡単な文法を含む手話の言語をつくった。たとえば、両手を握りしめてポンプを押すような動作をすれば、「輪」を示す。バンザイをするように両手を上げたら「ボール」、一方の手で手招きしたら「もってくる」という意味だ。「輪、ボール、もってくる」というサインを見て、アケアカマイはボールを輪のところまで押していく。語順を変えて、「ボール、輪、もってくる」にすると、今度は輪をボールのところまで運んでいく。

     訓練を重ねるうち、「右、かご、左、フリスビー、中」(右のかごに、左のフリスビーを入れろ)のように、もっと複雑な文法の指示も理解するようになった。こうした指示を初めて出されたときに正しくできるということは、文法をよく理解している証しだ。

     「イルカはとてもおしゃべりです」とハーマンは言う。「私たちの実験でわかったのですが、水槽に設置した水中マイクで、でたらめな音を流すと、イルカはその音をまねるんです。この能力は、仲間同士で意思疎通をはかる必要性と関係があるかもしれません。イルカに独自の言語があるかどうかはともかく、教えた言語で新しい指示を出すと、ちゃんと理解する。そうした能力をもっているんです」

     ハーマンは続ける。「イルカにできることは、ほかにもたくさんあります。たとえば、水槽のガラス窓越しにテレビを見せ、画面に映った人間がまったく新しい指示を出しても、イルカは1回で正しく理解します。映像が現実を映し出したものだとわかるんです。生身の人間が指示したときと同様に反応します」

     またイルカたちは、人間の動作をすぐにまねる。トレーナーが上体をそらして片脚を上げると、イルカも体をそらし、尾びれを空中に上げる。模倣には高度な知能はいらないと思われていたが、近年の認知研究で非常に難度が高いことがわかってきた。相手の体と姿勢を思い描いて、同じ姿勢になるよう、体の各部分の位置を調整しないといけない。これは、自分という存在を認識していることを示唆している。

     「次はエレレです」。ハーマンが映像を見せてくれた。トレーナーが「サーフボード、背びれ、触る」という指示を出すと、エレレはすぐに泳いでいき、体を傾かせて、背びれでそっとボードに触れた。訓練で覚えたのではなく、その場でできたのだ。トレーナーが両手をまっすぐ上げて「よくやった!」のサインを出すと、エレレはうれしそうに空中に身を躍らせ、キューキュー、カッカッと声を上げた。

     「エレレは、正確にできることが純粋にうれしいんです」とハーマン。「何かを新しく考え出すのも大好きです。私たちは、イルカが自分で考えて動作をするよう、“創作しなさい”という意味のサインも作りました」

     野生のイルカも、並んで水上にジャンプするなど、ショーのように動きを同調させることがよくある。イルカ同士がどうやって、ぴったり動きを合わせているのかはわかっていない。ハーマンは、4頭のイルカたちにこうした動きをさせられるのではないかと考えた。

     ビデオでは、アケアカマイとフェニックスに、演技を考案して一緒に演じるよう指示が出される。2頭はプールの中央へと泳いでいき、10秒ほど水中で輪を描くように一緒に泳ぐと、水上にジャンプして体を直立させたまま、時計方向にくるくる回転し、口から水を噴き出した。この間、2頭の動きはぴったり合っていた。「訓練は一切していません。いったいどうやって、こんなことができるのか……いや、できたのか」

     謎は永遠に謎のままだ。4年前、イルカたちはみんな相次いで死んでしまったからだ。

     ハーマンは4頭のイルカとともに、動物の心を探る研究で画期的な偉業を成し遂げた。水中生活を送るイルカが、進化の道筋で霊長類と枝分かれしたのは、はるか昔のこと。ハーマン自身でさえ「異界の生き物」と呼ぶ、人間とは遠くへだたった生物だ。

     進化の中で、異なる系統にある人間とイルカが、別々に認知能力を発達させたのはなぜなのか。ハーマンはこう解説する。「イルカにも人間にも、進化の過程で知能を発達させるような類似の力が働いたことを示しています。イルカと人間は体の構造も生息環境も違います。共通するのは、社会的な動物であること。母親に育てられる期間も寿命も長く、仲間と協力関係を築く必要があります。人間とイルカの知能の発達を促した共通の要因は、この点ではないかと考えられます」

     ハーマンは、イルカたちに深い愛情を注いでいた。「ペットに対して抱く愛情よりも、ずっと深いものでした。あのイルカたちは研究チームの仲間でした。それが唯一しっくりくる言葉です。死んだときには、それこそ自分の子どもを失ったような気がしたものです」

     ハーマンは、フェニックスとプールで撮った写真を見せてくれた。彼はこの雌のイルカを抱き寄せるように背中に腕を回し、にっこり笑っている。イルカは頭をハーマンの肩にのせ、やはりほほ笑んでいるように見える。その滑らかな体は光を受けて輝き、つぶらな目が何かを語りかけているようだ。写真からは、種を超えた愛情が伝わってくる。少なくともその瞬間、イルカと人間の心は通い合っていたのだ。

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.