U.S. arms sales

  • Notifications for foreign military sales (FMS) from the United States to other governments reached their lowest volume in recent memory in 2021, at just over $36 billion. But already by the end of June 2022, they had reached nearly $38 billion, more than all of 2021.
  • Europe and Eurasia took over from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region as the region with the greatest value of newly announced FMS offers between 2020 and 2021, but so far in 2022 (as of the end of June), in terms of value, East Asia and the Pacific has overtaken them both.
  • The top five recipients of U.S. FMS offers so far for 2022, through the end of June, in terms of value, are Indonesia, Poland, Egypt, Jordan, and Bulgaria.
  • Authorizations for direct commercial sales (DCS) from U.S. manufacturers to foreign buyers were also at relatively low levels for 2021, compared to previous years, at just under $41 billion.
  • The top five recipients of U.S. direct commercial sale (DCS) authorizations for 2021, in terms of U.S. dollar value, were Japan, the UK, Australia, Israel, and the UAE.

2 thoughts on “U.S. arms sales

  1. shinichi Post author

    U.S. ARMS SALES: 2021EARLY 2022

    CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL POLICY

    https://securityassistance.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/arms-sales-issue-brief-2022-7-29.pdf

    TRENDS IN U.S. ARMS SALES

    Foreign military sales (FMS) for 2022 through the end of June, in terms of U.S. dollar value, have now surpassed the total value of FMS for the entirety of 2021. The drop in volume, in terms of dollars, between 2020 and 2021 was the greatest drop in recent memory. The climb again so far in 2022 is a signal this year will be a more typical year in terms of arms sales value.

    Additionally at the end of June, the U.S. Department of State released a new report on direct commercial sales (DCS) for 2021, providing new information on commercial arms sales from the United States to recipient countries.

    This issue brief examines these trends, as well as key takeaways for 2021 and what that could mean for 2022, as well as U.S. recipients of arms sales, weapons categories, and corporate beneficiaries. In addition, the Security Assistance Monitor is planning to release additional briefs, following this one, that cover issues such as transparency, institutional reforms, and implications for key regions and recipients.

    KEY TAKEAWAYS

    1. Notifications for foreign military sales (FMS) from the United States to other governments reached their lowest volume in recent memory in 2021, at just over $36 billion. But already by the end of June 2022, they had reached nearly $38 billion, more than all of 2021.

    2. The Biden administration has moved away from the Trump-era focus on jobs as a justification for arms sales, focusing instead on efforts to strengthen countries allied with the United States that may hedge against the influence of China and Russia.

    3. Europe and Eurasia took over from the MENA region as the region with the greatest value of newly announced FMS offers between 2020 and 2021, but so far in 2022 (as of the end of June), in terms of value, East Asia and the Pacific has overtaken them both.

    4. The top five recipients of U.S. FMS offers so far for 2022, through the end of June, in terms of value, are Indonesia, Poland, Egypt, Jordan, and Bulgaria.

    5. A newly released U.S. Department of State report reveals that authorizations for direct commercial sales (DCS) from U.S. manufacturers to foreign buyers were also at relatively low levels for 2021, compared to previous years, at just under $41 billion. (2022 data is not yet available.)

    6. The top five recipients of U.S. direct commercial sale (DCS) authorizations for 2021, in terms of U.S. dollar value, were Japan, the UK, Australia, Israel, and the UAE.

    7. Military aircraft and engines continue to dominate the value of major weapons sales because of their high costs, but so far this year, ground vehicles, as well as bombs and missiles, have also been significant for major sales. The category of sea vessels has moved down as a major source of new arms offers since 2021, when they were largely driven by sales to Greece.

    8. As in 2020, a handful of companies benefited most from U.S. arms offers in 2021. The top three, again—Lockheed Martin, Boeing, and Raytheon Technologies—were involved in the vast majority of total offers for 2021.

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  2. shinichi Post author

    (sk)

    まとめると。。。

    • 2021年のアメリカの武器の販売が近年になく落ち込んだ
    • 中東や北アフリカでのこれ以上の武器の販売が望めなくなった
    • 武器の販売をヨーロッパ・ユーラシアにシフトしようとした
    • ロシアを悪者にして ウクライナやアルメニアなどで紛争を拡大してみた
    • ヨーロッパ・ユーラシアへの武器の販売は予想したほど増えなかった
    • 中国を悪者にするキャンペーンを拡大し 中国の脅威を煽ってみた
    • キャンペーンが効いて 東アジア・太平洋での武器の販売が増大した
    • そのおかげもあって 2022年のアメリカの武器の販売は思いのほか伸びた
    • 世界経済が低迷するなか アメリカの経済が被った打撃はそれほど大きくない

    アメリカの武器の販売のために(アメリカの経済のために)ウクライナやアルメニアで犠牲になる人々のことを考えると、なんともいえない気持ちになる。

    台湾をはじめとする東アジアの人たちが犠牲にならないことを祈るばかりだが、東アジアの人々は何も起きない状態で武器を買う。だから、アメリカは東アジアで紛争を拡大しなくても脅威を煽るだけで販売目標を達成できるので、紛争の拡大はなくて済むかもしれない。

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