General Treaty for Renunciation of War as an Instrument of National Policy

Article I.

The High Contracting Parties solemly declare in the names of their respective peoples that they condemn recourse to war for the solution of international controversies, and renounce it, as an instrument of national policy in their relations with one another.

Article II.

The High Contracting Parties agree that the settlement or solution of all disputes or conflicts of whatever nature or of whatever origin they may be, which may arise among them, shall never be sought except by pacific means.

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2 Responses to General Treaty for Renunciation of War as an Instrument of National Policy

  1. shinichi says:

    http://treaties.un.org/doc/Publication/UNTS/LON/Volume%2094/v94.pdf

    The General Treaty for Renunciation of War as an Instrument of National Policy (Kellogg–Briand Pact; Pact of Paris) was a 1928 international agreement in which signatory states promised not to use war to resolve “disputes or conflicts of whatever nature or of whatever origin they may be, which may arise among them”. Parties failing to abide by this promise “should be denied the benefits furnished by this treaty”. It was signed by Germany, France and the United States on August 27, 1928, and by most other nations soon after. Sponsored by France and the U.S., the Pact renounced the use of war and called for the peaceful settlement of disputes. Similar provisions were incorporated into the UN Charter and other treaties and it became a stepping stone to a more activist American policy. It is named after its authors: United States Secretary of State Frank B. Kellogg and French foreign minister Aristide Briand.

  2. shinichi says:

    第一條 締約國ハ國際紛爭解決ノ爲戰爭ニ訴フルコトヲ非トシ且其ノ相互關係ニ於テ國家ノ政策ノ手段トシテノ戰爭ヲ抛棄スルコトヲ其ノ各自ノ人民ノ名ニ於テ嚴肅ニ宣言ス

    第二條 締約國ハ相互間ニ起ルコトアルヘキ一切ノ紛爭又ハ紛議ハ其ノ性質又ハ起因ノ如何ヲ問ハス平和的手段ニ依ルノ外之カ處理又ハ解決ヲ求メサルコトヲ約ス

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