Eric Fisk

Cosmic_Calendar

This entry was posted in globe. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Eric Fisk

  1. shinichi says:

    File:Cosmic Calendar.png

    https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cosmic_Calendar.png

    The 13.8 billion year history of the universe mapped onto a single year, as popularized by Carl Sagan. At this scale the Big Bang takes place on January 1 at midnight, the current time is December 31 at midnight, and the longest human life is a blink of an eye (about 1/4th of a second).

    This image is the original work of Eric Fisk.

  2. shinichi says:

    Cosmic Calendar

    Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmic_Calendar

    The Cosmic Calendar is a method to visualize the vast history of the universe in which its 13.8 billion year lifetime is condensed down into a single year. In this visualization, the Big Bang took place at the beginning of January 1 at midnight, and the current moment is mapped onto the end of December 31 at midnight. At this scale, there are 438 years per second, 1.58 million years per hour, and 37.8 million years per day. This concept was popularized by Carl Sagan in his book The Dragons of Eden and on his television series Cosmos. In the 2014 sequel series, Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey, host Neil deGrasse Tyson presents the same concept of a Cosmic Calendar, but using the revised age of the universe of 13.8 billion years as an improvement on Sagan’s 1980 figure of 15 billion years. Sagan goes on to extend the comparison in terms of surface area, explaining that if the Cosmic Calendar is scaled to the size of a football field, then “all of human history would occupy an area the size of [his] hand”.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.