Ron Miller

While a machine can perform a given task, often more efficiently than we can, what it lacks is the artistry in the activity, that uniquely human ability to cater to the needs of the individual. The protocol may suggest one approach, but a person who is good at their job understands when to adjust and the subtleties that are required.
People still matter. And that’s an important point to keep in mind. Even in scenarios that don’t involve advanced education like physicians, it doesn’t mean that we as humans don’t want to interact with people instead of machines.
Technology marches relentlessly forward, and it would be foolish to argue otherwise, but some things remain fundamental, and people-to-people communication will continue to be one of them. Just because the tech is available, doesn’t mean it’s always going to be the best option in every situation.

This entry was posted in human being. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Ron Miller

  1. shinichi says:

    Technology can’t replace the human touch

    by Ron Miller

    https://techcrunch.com/2017/01/15/technology-cant-replace-the-human-touch/

    Everywhere you turn these days, there’s talk of automation replacing people. Technology is surely advancing at a rapid rate, and in today’s click-driven media environment, sensationalism sells, but just because tech can replace a human worker doesn’t mean we’re always going to want that. In some instances, even when tech can do an adequate job, we still want to deal with a person.

    While a machine can perform a given task, often more efficiently than we can, what it lacks is the artistry in the activity, that uniquely human ability to cater to the needs of the individual. The protocol may suggest one approach, but a person who is good at their job understands when to adjust and the subtleties that are required.

    The Obama administration’s recent report on the possible economic impact of artificial intelligence and automation looked at the issue at least partly through a policy prism. “Whether AI leads to unemployment and increases in inequality over the long run depends not only on the technology itself but also on the institutions and policies that are in place” the report stated. It went on to peg the percentage of jobs affected by automation over the next 10-20 years somewhere between 9 and 47 percent, a broad range that suggests the true impact won’t be known for some time.

    Many people involved in the startup ecosystem believe that we will always push tech to its fullest extent simply because we can, but not everyone agrees that’s a desirable approach. The New York Times reported on a McKinsey study last week, that found that, while automation is growing, it may not be at the pace we have been led to believe. “How automation affects employment will not be decided simply by what is technically feasible, which is what technologists tend to focus on,” McKinsey’s James Manyika told the Times.

    Ultimately, there will be many factors involved in the impact of automation, including our desire to interact with our fellow humans. Consider the automatic teller machine as a primary example. Developed in the 1960s and popularized in the 70s and 80s, it likely replaced some human tellers, but it’s 2017 and most banks still have tellers. Yes, you can get money whenever and wherever you want, even when the bank isn’t open. Heck, you can bank on your phone, but when you walk into the bank, there are still people working there because, when it comes to our money, sometimes we still want to talk to a trained professional.

    Certainly when it comes to medicine, we are going to want to continue dealing with highly educated people, even when there are machines helping our doctors come up with the proper diagnosis and treatment. Even if a machine could determine an appropriate plan — and as we know there are few absolutes in medicine — we still want to work with a doctor, who has been trained to talk us through the options and administer the treatment protocol — and who understands that art in the science.

    People still matter. And that’s an important point to keep in mind. Even in scenarios that don’t involve advanced education like physicians, it doesn’t mean that we as humans don’t want to interact with people instead of machines.

    For instance, technology exists to replace waitstaff with an iPad menu. One San Francisco restaurant has taken people out of the equation completely. After placing your order on the iPad, your food comes out of a little cubbie — no runners or any human contact required — but not everyone is going to want this kind of experience. Some people like to be welcomed by a person, who not only takes the order, but answers questions about the menu and brings you your food.

    The same goes for Uber or Lyft. Clearly, driverless cars are a growing reality, and car services want to go that route because it’s cheaper for them, but it doesn’t mean all consumers will enjoy a driverless ride. Some like the experience of talking to drivers. It’s more than simply getting from Point A to Point B (or enriching the car services).

    This is not about being a luddite. Technology marches relentlessly forward, and it would be foolish to argue otherwise, but some things remain fundamental, and people-to-people communication will continue to be one of them. Just because the tech is available, doesn’t mean it’s always going to be the best option in every situation.

  2. shinichi says:

    テクノロジーが「人間の温かみ」を置き換えることはできない

    by Ron Miller

    translated by 木村拓哉

    http://jp.techcrunch.com/2017/01/16/20170115technology-cant-replace-the-human-touch/

    最近、どこに行ってもオートメーションが人間の職を奪うという議論を耳にする。テクノロジーはもちろん急速に進歩し、クリックを中心とするメディア環境のなかではセンセーショナリズムが生まれる。しかし、テクノロジーが人間の代わりに働けるからといって、私たちがテクノロジーによるサービスを望むとは限らない。テクノロジーがまずまずの働きをするとしても、状況によっては、人間とやりとりしたいと思う場面があるのだ。

    機械は与えられたタスクを人間よりも効率的にこなせる一方で、それらが行うアクティビティには「芸術性」が欠けている。つまり、ニーズに応える能力だ。たとえ定められた手順があったとしても、優秀な人材はいつそのプロトコルを修正するべきか、そして、そこで必要となる機微とは何かを理解している。

    オバマ政権は先日、人工知能とオートメーションが与える経済的な影響をまとめた調査結果を発表している。この調査結果は、この問題を政策運営を担う立場から捉えたものだ。このレポートでは、「AIが失業を増やすのかどうか、そして長い目でみて不平等を増加させるかどうかは、テクノロジーそのものだけに依存する訳ではなく、その時の政権や政策に依存する」と述べられている。また、今後10年から20年間でオートメーションによって影響を受ける職業は全体の9%から47%程度だろうと推測している。そのレンジの大きさから分かるのは、オートメーションが与える本当の影響はまだ未知数だということだ。

    スタートアップのエコシステムに関わる人々はたいてい、自分たちであればテクノロジーを存分に普及させることができるし、また自分たちであればそれが可能だと考えている。しかし、誰もがそのアプローチに賛成という訳ではない。先週、New York TImesはMcKinseyによるレポートを発表したが、その調査で明らかになったのは、オートメーションは成長している一方で、そのペースは私たちが思っていた程のスピードではないということだ。「オートメーションが人間の職に与える影響の大きさを決めるのは、多くのテクノロジストがフォーカスするような、”技術的に可能なものは何か”という問いではありません」とNew York Timesに語るのは、McKinseyのJames Manyika氏だ。

    結局のところ、オートメーションが与える影響の大きさを決めるファクターは実にさまざまだ。人間との交流に対する欲求もその1つである。現金自動支払機(ATM)を例に考えてみよう。ATMが開発されたのは1960年代のことで、それが普及したのは70年代から80年代にかけてのことだった。ATMは銀行の窓口業務を置き換えるだろうと言われていたが、2017年になってもまだ銀行の窓口では人間が働いている。もちろん、銀行の営業時間外でもお金を引き出せるのは便利なことだ。最近ではスマホでお金のやり取りも完了する。それでも、いまだに銀行では人間が働いている。それはなぜなら、お金に関してはプロに相談してみたいと思う人々がいるからだ。

    また、医療に関しても同じことがいえる。たとえ適切な診断結果や治療法を提案する機械があったとしても、私たちは病気になったときには優秀な医師に相談したいと思うだろう。たとえ機械が適切な医療プランを決定するとしても ― 医療の分野には絶対的な治療法は数えられるほどしかないと理解しているが ―、考えられるオプションについて患者とともに考え、治療手順を実行するように訓練された医師と一緒に治療に励みたいと私たちは思うのだ ― 科学の”アート”について理解している彼らとだ。

    人間はいまだ重要な存在である。そして、そのことを心に留めておく必要がある。高度な教育を受けた医師の場合に限らず、人間である私たちは、人間の代わりに機械と交流することを望んでいるわけではないのだ。

    例えば、給仕スタッフをiPadのメニューに置き換えるというテクノロジーが存在する。サンフランシスコには人間を完全に除外したレストランも存在している。iPadで料理を注文すると、注文された品が小さな棚から出てくる ― 料理を運ぶ人間もいないので、そこに人間との交流はまったくない ―。だが、誰もがその体験をしたいと思っているわけではない。人間の店員に「いらっしゃいませ」と言われたい人もいるし、メニューや出される料理について人間に質問したいと思う人もいるのだ。

    同じことがUberやLyftでもいえる。ドライバーレスは明らかに実現しつつあるし、その方がコストが低くなるから企業もそれを望んでいる。だからといって、すべての顧客がドライバーレスを望んでいるわけではない。ドライバーとの会話を楽しみたいと思う人もいる。ただ単にA地点からB地点まで運んでくれればいいと思う人ばかりではないのだ。

    私はラダイト(19世紀初頭のイギリスで機械化に反対した熟練労働者の組織)になりたいわけではない。テクノロジーは容赦なく進歩を続けていく。それに反対することは馬鹿げたことだろう。しかし、テクノロジーによってファンダメンタルが失われることはない。人間と人間とのあいだのコミュケーションもその1つだ。あることを可能にするテクノロジーが存在するからといって、それが最良のオプションであるとは限らないのだ。

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.