Nicholas Korody, Pilar Olivares

Countries pour money into the festivities, often going far over budget, with the hope that they’ll receive a return—either through tourist dollars or else through raising the city’s profile internationally. And, after the closing games, those hulking stadiums and sports venues are expensive to maintain. They also can be hard to find a use for. Domestic sports just don’t draw the same crowds as the Olympics do.

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1 Response to Nicholas Korody, Pilar Olivares

  1. shinichi says:

    Take a look at the already-dilapidated facilities of the Rio Olympics

    by Nicholas Korody

    photo by Pilar Olivares

    Archinect News

    https://archinect.com/news/article/149991911/take-a-look-at-the-already-dilapidated-facilities-of-the-rio-olympics

    The Olympics are a costly venture. In fact, they’re more like a high-stakes gamble. Countries pour money into the festivities, often going far over budget, with the hope that they’ll receive a return—either through tourist dollars or else through raising the city’s profile internationally. And, after the closing games, those hulking stadiums and sports venues are expensive to maintain. They also can be hard to find a use for. Domestic sports just don’t draw the same crowds as the Olympics do.

    Some countries find creative reuses for their venues—from a water park in Beijing to a refugee center in Athens. But, even in the case of both these cities, the stadiums have largely fallen into disrepair due to neglect. The same goes, apparently, for Rio—eventhough the games ended less than a year ago. That’s not really a huge surprise considering the massive political turmoil gripping the country today.

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