John Pickrell

Part of an upper jaw with teeth found in Israel shows that modern humans ventured out of Africa much earlier than previously thought. The find adds to evidence that our species was overlapping with human relatives such as Neanderthals in the crossroads of the Levant for longer than previously realized.
Until recently, the fossil record suggested that our species, Homo sapiens, first appeared in East Africa around 200,000 years ago. While a larger wave of migration didn’t leave the continent until 50,000 to 60,000 years ago, small numbers of modern humans made forays outside of Africa as far back as 120,000 years ago, based on the known fossils. (Explore a map of human migration.)
Then, last June, research on fossils from a site called Jebel Irhoud in Morocco turned conventional wisdom on its head: Those modern-looking humans are up to 350,000 years old, scientists discovered, pushing back the early origins of our species.
The new Middle Eastern discovery, detailed today in Science, complements the Moroccan find by showing that Homo sapiens were also taking initial steps into Eurasia much earlier—around 180,000 years ago.

This entry was posted in human being. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to John Pickrell

  1. shinichi says:

    Oldest Human Fossil Outside Africa Discovered

    Part of an upper jaw found in Israel reveals that our species began making forays out of Africa more than 50,000 years earlier than thought.

    by John Pickrell

    National Geographic

    (JANUARY 25, 2018)

    https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/01/oldest-human-outside-africa-discovered-fossil-jaw-israel-science/

    Part of an upper jaw with teeth found in Israel shows that modern humans ventured out of Africa much earlier than previously thought. The find adds to evidence that our species was overlapping with human relatives such as Neanderthals in the crossroads of the Levant for longer than previously realized.

    Until recently, the fossil record suggested that our species, Homo sapiens, first appeared in East Africa around 200,000 years ago. While a larger wave of migration didn’t leave the continent until 50,000 to 60,000 years ago, small numbers of modern humans made forays outside of Africa as far back as 120,000 years ago, based on the known fossils. (Explore a map of human migration.)

    Then, last June, research on fossils from a site called Jebel Irhoud in Morocco turned conventional wisdom on its head: Those modern-looking humans are up to 350,000 years old, scientists discovered, pushing back the early origins of our species.

    The new Middle Eastern discovery, detailed today in Science, complements the Moroccan find by showing that Homo sapiens were also taking initial steps into Eurasia much earlier—around 180,000 years ago.

    “This is an exciting discovery that pushes the timing of modern humans leaving Africa back quite a bit,” says Darren Curnoe, an expert on human origins at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia.

    “Together with the discovery last year of the earliest modern humans in Africa, our views about our origins are beginning to change very rapidly, after decades of near scientific stagnation.”

    EXHAUSTIVE DATING

    The upper jaw fossil was discovered in 2002 during an ongoing archaeological excavation at a site called Misliya, found on Mount Carmel in northern Israel. The site was once a rock shelter frequented by various prehistoric human species over many hundreds of thousands of years.

    “Humans like to live in open rock shelters so that they can see if there’s danger or prey moving by, but also to stay dry. It was one of these terraces where they could overlook the landscape in front of them,” says study co-author Rainer Grün, director of the Australian Research Centre for Human Evolution at Griffith University in Queensland.

    Researchers carried out a detailed analysis to confirm that the shape of the teeth and jaw are those of a modern human and not a Neanderthal, says Grün. (Find out how Neanderthal genes might be affecting your health.)

    Though the fossil was found early on during the excavation, it was not dated until 2014/2015. The initial results were so surprising that the team decided to corroborate them, ultimately using four independent dating methods on the dentine of the teeth, the tooth enamel, sediment attached to the jaw, and stone found beside the fossil.

    The methods together yielded an estimated age of 177,000 to 194,000 years, reports the team, led by paleoanthropologist Israel Hershkovitz at Tel Aviv University.

    This age range “fits very well in the model that’s now emerging of a very ancient history of our species, much older than we have thought,” says Jean-Jacques Hublin of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, who led the team that made the 2017 Jebel Irhoud find.

    “The story of the ‘out of Africa’ movement of our species is more complicated that we previously thought.”

    WITH TOOLS, TOO

    It’s still unclear whether this was the earliest incursion of Homo sapiens into Eurasia, how far east they went, and why none of the early forays before about 50,000 years ago turned into a bigger wave of migration, Hublin adds.

    Over hundreds of thousands of years, there was “a sort of pulsation of this African population to the gate of western Asia,” he argues. These pulses may relate to so-called green Sahara episodes—intermittent periods of moister climate, when the current desert belt across North Africa was vegetated and people could move more freely.

    Another interesting aspect of the discovery is the tools found alongside the fossil, says Julia Galway-Witham, a paleoanthropologist at the Natural History Museum in London. The tools were fashioned with a relatively sophisticated method of stone knapping called the Levallois technique, which requires skill and forethought and allows greater control over the resulting scrapers or blades.

    “They represent the earliest association of this type of tool with modern humans outside Africa,” she says. “Perhaps the co-occurrence of this tool type with early Homo sapiens at Jebel Irhoud, Morocco—and now with modern humans at Misliya—indicates some association of the development of this technology in Africa and western Asia with the emergence of Homo sapiens in these regions.”

    With plenty of ongoing archaeological research in the Levant region, new fossils that can potentially answer the lingering questions about human migration into Asia may soon be found, Grün says.

    And the latest genetic work hints that there may have been even earlier treks out of Africa—and into the midst of other human species, adds Hublin. An analysis of ancient DNA in a 124,000-year-old German Neanderthal bone suggests that Neanderthals may have interbred with our own species more than 220,000 years ago.

  2. shinichi says:

    人類の出アフリカは18万年前?定説覆す化石発見

    イスラエルの洞窟で見つかった上顎化石は、人類史を書き換えるかもしれない

    文=John Pickrell/訳=三枝小夜子

    2018.01.29

    http://natgeo.nikkeibp.co.jp/atcl/news/18/012900041/

     アフリカで誕生した現生人類(ホモ・サピエンス)は、これまで考えられていた時期よりもずっと前から、アフリカの外へ出ていたようだ。イスラエルで発見された上顎の化石に関する研究成果が、科学誌『サイエンス』に発表された。

     この発見は、現生人類とネアンデルタール人などの近縁種が、地中海東岸地域で、これまで考えられていたより長い期間共存していたことを示す証拠にもなる。(参考記事:「人類3種が数万年も共存、デニソワ人研究で判明」)

    従来の人類史に風穴

     現生人類の誕生や移動については、つい最近まで次のように考えられてきた。現生人類が東アフリカに現れたのは今から約20万年前。アフリカ大陸からの大規模な移動が始まったのは5万~6万年前だが、小規模な移動は12万年前から始まっていたとするものだ。

     ところが2017年の6月、モロッコのジェベル・イルード遺跡で発見された化石の解析結果が、従来説に風穴を開けた。現生人類によく似たその化石は30万年以上前のものと推定され、ホモ・サピエンスの起源を大幅に遡らせる提案となった。(参考記事:「モロッコで見つかった30万年前の人類化石は初期ホモ・サピエンスか」)

     イスラエルでの今回の発見は、ホモ・サピエンスが今から約18万年前にユーラシア大陸に足を踏み出していたことを示している。これまで考えられていたより5万年以上早く、モロッコでの発見を補強するものになっている。

    「現生人類がアフリカを出た時期を大幅に遡らせる、非常に興味深い発見です」と、オーストラリア、ニューサウスウェールズ大学の初期人類研究者ダレン・カーノー氏は言う。「ここ数十年間、人類の起源をめぐる理論に大きな変化はなく、科学的には停滞に近い状態にあったのですが、去年アフリカで最古の現生人類が発見されたことや今回の発見により、急激に変化しはじめています」(参考記事:「人種の違いは、遺伝学的には大した差ではない」)

    4種の独立した年代測定

     今回調べられた上顎の化石は、2002年、イスラエル北部のカルメル山のミスリヤ洞窟で見つかった。この洞窟は、数十万年にわたり、先史時代の人類が入れ替わり立ち替わり利用した岩窟住居だった。

    「ヒトは、雨に濡れることなく、外から危険が迫っていないか、獲物が通らないかを確認することができる岩窟住居を好みます。ミスリヤ洞窟は、彼らが周囲を見渡すことのできるテラスの1つでした」と、オーストラリア、グリフィス大学の人類進化研究センター所長で論文の共著者であるライナー・グリュン氏は語る。

     歯と顎骨の形状を詳細に分析した研究チームは、これらがネアンデルタール人ではなく現生人類のものであるという結論に達した。

     この化石は発掘調査が始まってすぐに発見されていたが、年代測定は2014~2015年になってから行われた。最初にあまりにも意外な結果が出たため、研究チームは確証が必要だと判断し、歯の象牙質とエナメル質、顎に付着した堆積物、化石のそばで見つかった石につき、4種類の独立の年代測定法を用いた。

     イスラエル、テルアビブ大学の古人類学者イスラエル・ヘルシュコヴィッツ氏が率いる研究チームは、これらの手法から、化石は17万7000~19万4000年前のものであると見積もった。

     2017年にジェベル・イルードの化石を発見した独マックス・プランク進化人類学研究所のジャン=ジャック・ユブラン氏は、「近年、現生人類はこれまで考えられていたよりはるかに昔に出現したというモデルが登場しています。今回の推定年代は、このモデルと非常によく一致します」と言う。

    「ホモ・サピエンスの『出アフリカ』の物語は、思ったよりはるかに複雑なのです」(参考記事:「人類の出アフリカは定説より早かった?」)

    熟練と計画性を要する道具
     これがホモ・サピエンスのユーラシア大陸への最初の進出なのか、彼らはどこまで東に行ったのか、初期の小規模な移動が5万年前まで大きな流れにならなかったのはなぜかなど、はっきりしないことはまだあるとユブラン氏は言う。(参考記事:「ヒトはなぜ人間に進化した? 12の仮説とその変遷」)

     数十万年にわたり、「アフリカの人口が西アジアの入り口に間欠的に押し寄せる動きがありました」とユブラン氏。この動きは、いわゆる「グリーン・サハラ」と関係があるのかもしれない。グリーン・サハラとは、間欠的に気候が湿潤になり、現在のサハラ砂漠のある一帯に植物が繁茂して、人々が自由に移動できた時代のことだ。

     英ロンドン自然史博物館の古人類学者ジュリア・ゴールウェイ=ウィザム氏は、今回の発見でもう1つ興味深いのは、化石のそばで見つかった道具であるという。この道具は、ルヴァロワ技法という比較的洗練された技法で作られた打製石器だ。ルヴァロワ技法には熟練と計画性が必要で、この技法で作られたスクレイパー(掻器)や石刃は使い勝手がよい。

    「今回の発見は、ルヴァロワ技法の石器と、アフリカの外の現生人類との最も早いつながりを示しています」と彼女は言う。「このタイプの石器はモロッコのジェベル・イルードでも出土しています。アフリカと西アジアにおけるルヴァロワ技法の発達と、これらの地域でのホモ・サピエンスの出現との間に、なんらかの関連があることを示しているのかもしれません」

     グリュン氏は、地中海東岸地域では多くの考古学研究が進められているので、人類のアジアへの進出をめぐる謎に答えを与えるような新しい化石もすぐに見つかるかもしれないと期待している。

     ユブラン氏によると、さらに早い時期にアフリカを出て、近縁種の中に入って行った集団があったことを示唆する最新の遺伝学研究もあるという。研究では、ドイツで発見された12万4000年前のネアンデルタール人の骨をDNA解析したところ、今から22万年以上前にネアンデルタール人と現生人類が交雑していた可能性があるとしている。(参考記事:「ネアンデルタール人と人類の出会いに新説」)

  3. shinichi says:

    人種の違いは、遺伝学的には大した差ではない
    専門家に聞く「第4の人類がいた?」「犯罪者の遺伝子から何がわかる?」
    2017.10.19
    http://natgeo.nikkeibp.co.jp/atcl/news/17/101800399/

    **

    30万年前の人類化石は初期ホモ・サピエンスか
    モロッコで見つかった現代的な顔の化石は人類史を書き換えるかもしれない
    2017.06.10
    http://natgeo.nikkeibp.co.jp/atcl/news/17/060900217/

    **

    人類3種が数万年も共存、デニソワ人研究で判明
    “第3の人類”のDNA分析で。現生人類とネアンデルタール人と時期重なる
    2015.11.19
    http://natgeo.nikkeibp.co.jp/atcl/news/15/111800325/

    **

    ヒトはなぜ人間に進化した? 12の仮説とその変遷
    ヒト属の新種ホモ・ナレディ発見にあたり考えた
    2015.09.18
    http://natgeo.nikkeibp.co.jp/atcl/news/15/091700262/

    **

    ネアンデルタール人と人類の出会いに新説
    高度な石器文化をネアンデルタール人から受け継いだ可能性も
    2015.03.02
    http://natgeo.nikkeibp.co.jp/nng/article/20150227/437373/

    **

    人類の出アフリカは定説より早かった?
    2011.01.27
    http://natgeo.nikkeibp.co.jp/nng/article/news/14/3731/

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.