Edna St. Vincent Millay

I, being born a woman and distressed
By all the needs and notions of my kind,
Am urged by your propinquity to find
Your person fair, and feel a certain zest
To bear your body’s weight upon my breast:
So subtly is the fume of life designed,
To clarify the pulse and cloud the mind,
And leave me once again undone, possessed.
Think not for this, however, the poor treason
Of my stout blood against my staggering brain,
I shall remember you with love, or season
My scorn with pity, —let me make it plain:
I find this frenzy insufficient reason
For conversation when we meet again.

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2 Responses to Edna St. Vincent Millay

  1. shinichi says:

    I, Being born a Woman and Distressed (Sonnet XLI)

    by Edna St. Vincent Millay

    (1892 – 1950)

  2. shinichi says:

    Sonnet

    Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sonnet

    A sonnet is a poem in a specific form which originated in Italy; Giacomo da Lentini is credited with its invention.

    The term sonnet is derived from the Italian word sonetto (from Old Provençal sonet a little poem, from son song, from Latin sonus a sound). By the thirteenth century it signified a poem of fourteen lines that follows a strict rhyme scheme and specific structure. Conventions associated with the sonnet have evolved over its history. Writers of sonnets are sometimes called “sonneteers”, although the term can be used derisively.

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