Devin Coldewey

For the first time in history, people have a way of securing their communications quickly, automatically, and at will from any threat, be it hackers or government snoops.
Good for us — but for the FBI and the police, it’s a calamity. Where once they could pry open locked drawers to find incriminating letters, or force a company to reveal private records, now everything depends on the willingness of the owner to allow that information to be decrypted.
Since they can’t go through the front door, so to speak, they have asked repeatedly for a back door. But what exactly is a backdoor, and why should you care?
The concept of a backdoor is simple to state but not so simple to definitively pin down. Like the back door of a house, a crypto backdoor (generally written as a single word) is a way to circumvent the locks and protections of the main entrance in order to walk in unobstructed and make oneself comfortable. A backdoor could be in a phone, laptop, router, security camera — any device, really.

This entry was posted in information. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Devin Coldewey

  1. shinichi says:

    WTF is a backdoor?

    by Devin Coldewey

    https://techcrunch.com/2017/01/29/wtf-is-a-backdoor/

    The last two decades have seen a steady migration from analog to digital means for communication and the storage of information.

    Following closely behind (sometimes not closely enough, as some have found to their peril) was the drive to keep that information secure. The threat of hacking and the desire to assure users of their privacy has led to the encryption of data while it is both at rest and in transmission becoming standard practice. And, just as a bank can’t open a secure deposit box to which only you have the key, proper encryption means that even the companies providing and hosting services can’t access that data unless you authorize it.

    But even the strongest safe or door will succumb to drill or explosives. Advances in cryptography methods and increases in computing power have created encryption that cannot be reversed in a realistic timeframe. For the first time in history, people have a way of securing their communications quickly, automatically, and at will from any threat, be it hackers or government snoops.

    Good for us — but for the FBI and the police, it’s a calamity. Where once they could pry open locked drawers to find incriminating letters, or force a company to reveal private records, now everything depends on the willingness of the owner to allow that information to be decrypted.

    Since they can’t go through the front door, so to speak, they have asked repeatedly for a back door. But what exactly is a backdoor, and why should you care?

    A unique threat

    The concept of a backdoor is simple to state but not so simple to definitively pin down. Like the back door of a house, a crypto backdoor (generally written as a single word) is a way to circumvent the locks and protections of the main entrance in order to walk in unobstructed and make oneself comfortable. A backdoor could be in a phone, laptop, router, security camera — any device, really.

    But backdoors are different from other means of bypassing traditional security. Security researcher Jonathan Zdziarski provides a useful framework for distinguishing a backdoor from a bug, exploit, or administrative access.

    First, backdoors operate without consent of the computer system’s owner. This excludes things like administrative access to employee emails, something people often consent to as part of a job, or Comcast maintaining a separate login for your router for troubleshooting purposes. But if the Comcast adds another, secret login, that meets the standard.

    Second, the actions performed by backdoors are at odds to the stated purpose of the system. Say a device claims to keep your messages safe; the manufacturer may have a way to install updates on it to keep it functional, which is perfectly compatible with its intended purpose. If, however, the device includes a way of accessing your messages without your knowledge, that’s counter to the intended purpose and qualifies.

    Third, backdoors are under the control of undisclosed actors. Many viruses and worms operate more or less autonomously, harvesting information or spamming your contacts; unless a third party is directing their actions (as in ransomware or botnets), they don’t count as backdoors — since there’s nowhere to go through it.

    Knock knock

    Many Americans will have recently heard the word “backdoor” during the FBI’s high-profile dispute with Apple, which provides a useful example for defining the term. In the course of a terrorism investigation, the FBI tried to force Apple to create code that would unlock an iPhone at the request of law enforcement. Apple CEO Tim Cook wrote at the time, “The U.S. government has asked us for something we simply do not have, and something we consider too dangerous to create. They have asked us to build a backdoor to the iPhone.”

    The FBI was asking Apple to build software that would operate without the consent of the device owner, decrypt a version of iOS that promised robust encryption, and remain under the secretive control of the FBI — meeting all three conditions set out above.

    But backdoors are far from a new phenomenon, and don’t have to take the form of a piece of software installed in an otherwise free device. One example of deeper integration dates back to 1992.

    That year, under the direction of the NSA, the company Mykotronx made a dedicated chip for encrypting telephone communications on lines where secrecy and privacy were important, for example in R&D or at an embassy. This “Clipper Chip” was a replacement for an existing chip, and featured an important addition: a “Law Enforcement Access Field” into which a code could be entered to bypass the device’s encryption altogether.

    The code, generated at manufacture, would be kept in strictest secrecy by federal agencies. Privacy advocates vociferously opposed this concept of “key escrow” carried out at the hardware level for several reasons, not least of which were the inability of the public to verify the security of this secret system or the process by which it would be employed.

    The Clipper Chip was scrapped, but the idea lives on, though perhaps not in quite such an obvious way. Various routers, wireless chips, and other components of transmission and storage devices have repeatedly been demonstrated to contain mechanisms by which the manufacturer, or of course any actor of its choosing, can gain access to the device.

    It’s possible to put a backdoor even deeper. It was reported that the NSA paid $10 million to back an encryption standard that used a particular random number generation technique that the agency knew was flawed. Any product that used this standard would have been effectively backdoored by the NSA, at such a fundamental level that it would be very difficult to detect.

    Trust, but verify

    If you’re worried about the possibility that some gadget or app you use has a backdoor — well, you should be! But there is a silver lining: lots of very savvy people are worried about it too, and they have their eyes wide open.

    When someone claims to have a secure protocol or service, they are invariably asked to make their methods public so independent investigators can look in the code for any flaws, whether inadvertent or deliberate. And standard encryption methods are strong and thorough enough now that hackers and spooks are redirecting their efforts. It’s far easier getting someone to click a shady link in a phishing email or tricking a criminal into unlocking their phone than trying to get a backdoor put into the system.

    The threat of backdoors is still a clear and present one. Fortunately, an informed (and occasionally outraged) public is a powerful deterrent to their creation.

  2. shinichi says:

    いまさら聞けないバックドア入門

    by Devin Coldewey

    translated by Sako

    https://jp.techcrunch.com/2017/01/30/20170129wtf-is-a-backdoor/

    この20年は、コミュニケーションと情報の保存の手段が、継続的にアナログからデジタルへ移行してきた時代だ。

    そして、そうした移行に付き従って(危険性の認識に歩調が伴わないこともあったが)、その情報の安全性を保とうとする動きが伴っていた。ハッキングの脅威と、ユーザーのプライバシーを守りたいという欲求は、データの暗号化に繋がった。これは保存時と転送時の両方に普通に適用されるようになっている。そして、あなただけがキーを持っているので、銀行があなたのセキュリティボックスを開くことができないように、適切な暗号化を施すことで、サービスを提供しホストしている会社であっても、あなたが許可しない限りデータアクセスすることができなくなる。

    しかし例え最強の金庫やドアであったとしても、ドリルや爆破には屈する。暗号化手法の進歩ならびに計算パワーの増加は、現実的な時間では解読できない暗号を生み出した。史上初めて、人びとは、ハッカーや政府による詮索などのあらゆる脅威から、迅速かつ自動的にコミュニケーションを保護する手段を手に入れたのだ。

    私たちのためには良いことだ。しかし、FBIや警察にとっては、それは災難に他ならない。かつては罪の証拠を探すために、机の引き出しをこじ開けたり、企業の内部記録を押収することが可能だった。しかし現在は全てが持ち主による暗号解読許可の意思に依存している。

    彼らは、フロントドアを通過することができないので、繰り返しバックドアの設置を求めてきた。しかしバックドアとは正確には何で、あなたが気にしなければならない理由とは何だろうか?

    これまでとは違う脅威

    バックドアのコンセプトは簡単だが、きちんと定義付けるのはそれほど簡単ではない。家のバックドアと同様に、「暗号」バックドアは、中を自由に歩いて好きなように振る舞う目的で、メインの玄関のロックや保護機構を回避するための手段である。バックドアは実際、電話、ノートパソコン、ルーター、監視カメラなどのあらゆるデバイスの中に設定し得る。

    しかし、バックドアは、セキュリティをバイパスするための従来の手段とは異なるものだ。セキュリティ研究者のJonathan Zdziarskiは、バックドアをバグ、不当アクセス、そして管理目的のアクセスから区別するための有用な概念フレームワークを提供している。

    第1に、バックドアとは、コンピュータシステムの所有者の同意なしに動作するものだ。 このことで、従業員の電子メールにアクセスするような管理目的アクセスは除外されることになる、人びとはそうしたものに対して、仕事の一部としてある程度の同意を行うからである。また、Comcast(米国のケーブルTV会社)があなたのルーターに対してトラブル解決のために別名でログインを行うことも除外される。しかし、もしComcastがそれ以外の秘密のログインを追加したなら、それはバックドアの基準の1つを満たすことになる。

    第2に、バックドアによって実行されるアクションが、システムの本来定められた目的に対立する場合。 例えばあるデバイスがあなたのメッセージを安全に保つと主張しているとしよう。製造者はそのデバイスが上手く動作し続けるように、アップデートをインストールするための手段を用意するだろう、このことは意図した目的に完全に合致したものである。しかし、もしデバイスがあなたの知らないうちにあなたのメッセージにアクセスする手段を提供するならば、それは意図された目的と基準に反するものだ。

    第3に、バックドアは、正体不明の操作者の制御下にあるものだ。 多くのウイルスやワームは、多かれ少なかれ自律的に動作し、情報を収集したりユーザーの連絡先に対してスパムを送ったりする。もし第3者がその動作(ランサムウェアやボットネットなど)を指示していないのなら、それらはバックドアとは見なされない、なぜならそれはどこにも通じていないからだ。

    ノックの音が

    多くのアメリカ人は、最近の有名なFBIとAppleの係争の最中に「バックドア」という単語を聞いたことがあるだろう。テロ捜査の過程で、FBIは、法執行機関からの要請でiPhoneのロックを解除できるコードの作成を、Appleに強制しようとした。そのときApple CEOであるティム・クックは「米国政府は、今私たちが持っておらず、そして作成することはとても危険なものを出せと要請して来ました。iPhoneへのバックドアを作ることを求めてきたのです」と述べている。

    FBIは、Appleに、FBIの秘密主義の制御の下で、デバイスの所有者の同意なしに、安全性を謳ったiOSでの解読を行うようなソフトウェアを作成するように依頼していたのだ、これらは上の3条件全てを満たす。

    しかし、バックドアは、決して新しいものではない。後からデバイスにインストールされるソフトウェアの形を取る必要がない場合もある。より深い統合の例を、1992年に遡って見ることができる。

    その年、NSA(アメリカ国家安全保障局)の指導の下、Mykotronxという会社が(例えばR&Dとか大使館などの)、秘密とプライバシーが重要な回線上での通信を暗号化するための専用チップを作成した。この「クリッパーチップ」は、既存のチップを置き換えるものだが、重要な追加機能が備わっていた。それは「法執行機関アクセスフィールド」というものの存在で、ここにコードを書き込むことによって、デバイスの暗号化機能もバイパスすることができるようになっていた。

    製造時に生成されたコードは、連邦政府機関によって最重要機密として保管されることになる。プライバシー保護団体が、このハードウェアレベルで実現される「キーエスクロー」の概念に、幾つもの理由から激しく反対した。そのうちの1つは、採用された機構で実現される秘密システムもしくはプロセスのセキュリティを、公の場所で検証する手段が与えられないから、というものである。

    クリッパーチップは廃棄されたものの、考え方は生き続けている。おそらくは、そのような分かりやすいやり方ではなく。種々のルーター、無線チップ、そしてその他の送信や記憶装置の構成要素の中に、その製造業者や、そしてもちろんその存在を知っている第3者が誰でもアクセスできるような機構が含まれていることは、何度も示されている。

    更に深いレベルにバックドアを仕掛けることも可能だ。かつてNSAが、欠陥があることを知っていた特定の乱数発生技術を使う、ある暗号標準の普及の後押しに、1000万ドルを支払ったことが報告されている。この暗号標準を使っていた任意の製品は、NSAによって容易にバックドアを仕掛けられることになっていたのだ。こうした基礎的なレベルでのバックドアの検出は、とても困難だ。

    信頼せよ、しかし確かめよ。

    もしあなたが使うガジェットやアプリが、バックドアを持っている可能性に不安を感じるなら…いや、もちろん感じるべきだ!しかし、希望の兆しはある。多くの能力のある人たちもそれを心配していて、監視の目をしっかりと見開いている。

    誰かがセキュアなプロトコルやサービスがあると主張したときには、独立した研究者たちがコードの欠陥を調べることができるように、その手法を公開することが常に求められる。また標準暗号化方式は、今や強力かつ十分に徹底したものになっているので、ハッカーやスパイたちはそのやりかたの方向を見直している。誰かにフィッシングメールの中の不正リンクをクリックさせたり、犯罪者を騙して携帯電話をアンロックさせる方が、システムにバックドアを仕掛けるよりも遥かに簡単だ。

    だがバックドアの脅威は依然はっきりとしていて、現実に存在しているものだ。幸いなことに、知識を与えられた(そして時には怒った)人びとが、その作成に対する強力な抑止力となる。

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.