Ovid

Love on this side, Hatred on that, are struggling, and are dragging my tender heart in opposite directions; but Love, I think, still gets the better. I will hate, 646 if I can; if not, reluctantly will I love; the bull loves not his yoke; still, that which he hates he bears.
I fly from treachery; your beauty, as I fly, brings me back; I abhor the failings of your morals; your person I love. Thus, I can neither live without you, nor yet with you; and I appear to be unacquainted with my own wishes. I wish that either you were less handsome, or less unprincipled. So beauteous a form does not suit morals so bad. Your actions excite hatred; your beauty demands love. Ah wretched me! she is more potent than her frailties.
O pardon me, by the common rites of our bed, by all the Gods who so often allow themselves to be deceived by you, and by your beauty, equal to a great Divinity with me, and by your eyes, which have captivated my own; whatever you shall be, ever shall you be mine; only do you make choice whether you will wish me to wish as well to love you, or whether I am to love you by compulsion. I would rather spread my sails and use propitious gales; since, though I should refuse, I shall still be forced to love.

This entry was posted in love. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Ovid

  1. shinichi says:

    THE AMORES; or, AMOURS

    by Ovid

    Literally Translated into English Prose, with Copious Notes, by Henry T. Riley in 1885

    https://www.gutenberg.org/files/47676/47676-h/47676-h.htm#link2H_4_0048

    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/47676/47676-h/47676-h.htm

    BOOK THE THIRD.

    ELEGY XI.

    He tells his mistress that he cannot help loving her.

    Much and long time have I suffered; by your faults is my patience overcome. Depart from my wearied breast, disgraceful Love. In truth I have now liberated myself, and I have burst my chains; and I am ashamed to have borne what it shamed me not to endure. I have conquered; and Love subdued I have trodden under foot; late have the horns come upon my head. Have patience, and endure, this pain will one day avail thee; often has the bitter potion given refreshment to the sick.

    And could I then endure, repulsed so oft from thy doors, to lay a free-born body upon the hard ground? And did I then, like a slave, keep watch before thy street door, for some stranger I know not whom, that you were holding in your embrace? And did I behold it, when the wearied paramour came out of your door, carrying off his jaded and exhausted sides? Still, this is more endurable than the fact that I was beheld by him; may that disgrace be the lot of my foes.

    When have I not kept close fastened to your side as you walked, myself your keeper, myself your husband, myself your companion? And, celebrated by me forsooth, did you please the public: my passion was the cause of passion in many. Why mention the base perjuries of your perfidious tongue? and why the Gods forsworn for my destruction? Why the silent nods of young men at banquets, and words concealed in signs arranged beforehand? She was reported to me to be ill; headlong and distracted I ran; I arrived; and, to my rival she was not ill.

    Bearing these things, and others on which I am silent, I have oft endured them; find another in my stead, who could put up with these things. Now my ship, crowned with the votive chaplet, listens in safety to the swelling waves of the ocean. Cease to lavish your blandishments and the words which once availed; I am not a fool, as once I was. Love on this side, Hatred on that, are struggling, and are dragging my tender heart in opposite directions; but Love, I think, still gets the better. I will hate, if I can; if not, reluctantly will I love; the bull loves not his yoke; still, that which he hates he bears.

    I fly from treachery; your beauty, as I fly, brings me back; I abhor the failings of your morals; your person I love. Thus, I can neither live without you, nor yet with you; and I appear to be unacquainted with my own wishes. I wish that either you were less handsome, or less unprincipled. So beauteous a form does not suit morals so bad. Your actions excite hatred; your beauty demands love. Ah wretched me! she is more potent than her frailties.

    O pardon me, by the common rites of our bed, by all the Gods who so often allow themselves to be deceived by you, and by your beauty, equal to a great Divinity with me, and by your eyes, which have captivated my own; whatever you shall be, ever shall you be mine; only do you make choice whether you will wish me to wish as well to love you, or whether I am to love you by compulsion. I would rather spread my sails and use propitious gales; since, though I should refuse, I shall still be forced to love.

  2. shinichi says:

    Ovid

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ovid

    Publius Ovidius Naso (20 March 43 BC – 17/18 AD), known as Ovid in the English-speaking world, was a Roman poet who lived during the reign of Augustus. He was a contemporary of the older Virgil and Horace, with whom he is often ranked as one of the three canonical poets of Latin literature. The Imperial scholar Quintilian considered him the last of the Latin love elegists. He enjoyed enormous popularity, but, in one of the mysteries of literary history, was sent by Augustus into exile in a remote province on the Black Sea, where he remained until his death. Ovid himself attributes his exile to carmen et error, “a poem and a mistake”, but his discretion in discussing the causes has resulted in much speculation among scholars.

    The first major Roman poet to begin his career during the reign of Augustus, Ovid is today best known for the Metamorphoses, a 15-book continuous mythological narrative written in the meter of epic, and for works in elegiac couplets such as Ars Amatoria (“The Art of Love”) and Fasti. His poetry was much imitated during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, and greatly influenced Western art and literature. The Metamorphoses remains one of the most important sources of classical mythology.

  3. shinichi says:

    オウィディウス

    https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/オウィディウス

    プーブリウス・オウィディウス・ナーソー(紀元前43年3月20日 – 紀元後17年または18年)は、帝政ローマ時代最初期の詩人の一人。共和政末期に生まれ、アウグストゥス帝治下で平和を享受し繁栄するローマにて詩作を行った。エレギーア形式で詠まれた『愛の歌(英語版)』や『恋の技法(英語版)』などの恋愛詩集や、叙事詩の形式で詠まれた『変身物語』などがよく知られている。『変身物語』は15巻12000行あまりの大作で、韻律としてヘクサメトロスを用い、神話伝説上の数々の変身譚を語る。一般にギリシア・ローマ神話(英語版)の集大成と受け取られている。

    存命中から絶大な人気を博したオウィディウスであったが、紀元後8年にアウグストゥス帝の命により黒海に面した僻地に追放され、そこで生涯を閉じた。追放の理由はよくわかっておらず、文学史上最も不可解な事件の一つである。オウィディウス自身は追放の原因を「一つの詩歌と一つの過誤(carmen et error)に帰す」とだけ書いた。その言葉の選びようが意味深長であるからかえって、その意図するところをめぐって、後代の学者たちが膨大な議論を積み重ねることになった。

    ラテン文学史上は「黄金の時代」の掉尾を飾る詩人とされる。オウィディウスの詩作品は後期古代から中世にかけての時代に多くの詩人に模倣され、西洋美術と西洋文学(スペイン語版)に絶大な影響を与えた。ウェルギリウスやホラティウスよりは一世代若い世代に属する。彼らの時代から下ること数十年後の修辞学者クインティリアヌスはオウィディウスを最後のラテン恋愛悲劇作家と評した。

    **

    恋人のコリンナに宛てた一連の恋愛詩『愛の歌』の現伝する最古の版は紀元前8年から3年ごろに出版された3巻本である。この版は改訂版であって、1巻目の冒頭に付されたエピグラムによると、それ以前の紀元前16年から15年に5巻本の初版が出版されたらしい。

    **

    『愛の歌』(Amores、アモーレス)はエレギーア韻律の恋愛詩を集めた3巻本である。エレギーア韻律の恋愛詩の定型化はティブッルスとプロペルティウスにより行われた。エレギーアの発展にこの二人の詩人が寄与した部分は確かに大きい。しかしながら、このジャンルに革新をもたらした詩人はオウィディウスである。彼はこの詩形における主導者を、詩人からアモル(愛神)へと切り替えた。つまり、詩の詠み人が愛を勝ち取ることに焦点を当てるのではなく、人々の上にいる愛神の勝利に焦点を当てた。この転回は詩という文学ジャンル上、初の転回であった。オウィディウスの革新は「愛」という抽象概念のメタファーを用いたこと、つまり、愛のアレゴリー化に要約される。

    3巻本の本書は、コリンナと呼ばれるある婦人と詩人との関係を中心に、愛の諸相を描写する。多彩な詩の中には、恋愛をしていく中で起こりうるいくつかの出来事が描写されるが、それは文学的な装飾と自由な語りを伴って読者に提示される。

    第1巻は15編の詩を収める。第1歌でオウィディウスは、自分は叙事詩を書こうとしたのだと語る。ところがクピードーが私から脚韻を盗み、詠い続けることができなくなったため、それを恋愛悲歌に作りかえたのだ、という。第4歌は教訓詩の形式を取り、のちに『恋の技法』で展開することになる警句を述べる。第5歌は正午の逢い引きを詠う。また、恋人の名前がコリンナであることが明かされる。第8歌と第9歌は贈り物に惹かれるコリンナを描くが、第11歌と第12歌の描写で詩人の企みが失敗したことが示される。第14歌はコリンナが髪の毛を染めようとして大失敗した話である。第15歌ではオウィディウスをはじめ、その他の恋愛詩人の命も永遠ではないと強調される。

    第2巻は19編を収める。巻頭の歌はオウィディウスがエレギーアのために巨人族との戦いをあきらめたことを語る。第2歌と第3歌は詩人がコリンナを護衛する供回りの者どもに、なんとか彼女に一目会わせてくれと頼むさまを詠う。第6歌はコリンナの飼っていた鸚鵡の死を悼む哀歌である。第7歌と第8歌はオウィディウスがコリンナの召使いに手を出し、それがコリンナに露見する事件を扱う。第11歌と第12歌はコリンナが休暇で遠くへ行ってしまうのを引き止めようとする内容。第13歌は病気になったコリンナの平癒をイシスに祈願する祈りの歌、第14歌は妊娠中絶に反対する歌、第19歌は油断している世の妻帯者たちへの警告の歌である。

    第3巻は15編を収める。第1歌は擬人化された「悲劇」と「哀歌」がオウィディウスを巡って争う様が詠われる。第2歌は競馬大会に行く描写があり、第3歌と第8歌では他の男たちにこころ惹かれるコリンナの女心が主題である。第10歌は地母神ケレースへの恨み歌である。なぜならこの女神の祭には禁欲が求められるからである。第13歌はユーノー祭についての歌、第9歌はティブッルスに捧げる哀歌である。第11歌でオウィディウスはこれ以上コリンナを愛するのは止そうと心に決める。そして彼女について詩を詠んだことに後悔する。最終の第15歌は詩人の愛をかき立てたミューズ(コリンナのこと)への告別の歌である。『愛の歌』はこれまでのところ、自意識に溢れ、非常に雄弁なエレギーア詩の作例であると評価されている。

    **

    コリンナが実在の人物とすれば誰に当たるのかという問題は、手がかりが何もない。以上のようなことから、コリンナは実在の人物ではなく、詩人と彼女の関係は作品を創造するための文学的虚構であると考えられている。コリンナはエレギーア詩というジャンルそれ自体のアレゴリー(擬人化)であるという解釈もなされている。

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.