Ian Bremmer

Russia’s parliament approved a law that might allow the country to cordon off its internet from the rest of the world, creating an unprecedented “sovereign” internet.
If Russia is able to pull this off (a very big if), it will be the most tangible step yet toward fracturing the web.
This law will regulate how internet traffic moves through critical infrastructure for the internet. By November internet service providers will have to adopt new routing and filtering technology and grant regulators the authority to directly monitor and censor content it deems objectionable. But the real groundbreaker is the intent to create a national domain name system (DNS) by 2021, probably as a back-up to the existing global system that translates domain names into numerical addresses. If Russia builds a workable version and switches it on, traffic would not enter or leave Russia’s borders. In effect, it means turning on a standalone Russian internet, disconnected from the rest of the world.

This entry was posted in information. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Ian Bremmer

  1. shinichi says:

    The quick read about … Russia’s new internet law

    by Ian Bremmer

    http://time.com/5578737/the-quick-read-about-russias-new-internet-law/

    What happened this week:

    Last week, Russia’s parliament approved a law that might allow the country to cordon off its internet from the rest of the world, creating an unprecedented “sovereign” internet. Russian President Vladimir Putin is expected to sign it in short order.

    Why it matters:

    It matters because if Russia is able to pull this off (a very big if), it will be the most tangible step yet toward fracturing the web. It could also be a harbinger of things to come in other countries.

    This law will regulate how internet traffic moves through critical infrastructure for the internet. By November internet service providers will have to adopt new routing and filtering technology and grant regulators the authority to directly monitor and censor content it deems objectionable. But the real groundbreaker is the intent to create a national domain name system (DNS) by 2021, probably as a back-up to the existing global system that translates domain names into numerical addresses. If Russia builds a workable version and switches it on, traffic would not enter or leave Russia’s borders. In effect, it means turning on a standalone Russian internet, disconnected from the rest of the world.

    No country has ever tried to build its own internet architecture before. Even China, the world leader when it comes to internet censorship, has built its “Great Firewall” on the existing global DNS—it filters traffic but is still part of the same worldwide addressing system. The authors of Russia’s law say it will make the internet in Russia more resilient against outside attacks, but its main effect is to vastly expand the government’s control of the internet and its underlying infrastructure. The national DNS probably isn’t meant for daily use but instead for government-defined emergencies. Of course, an emergency for the Kremlin could be widespread protests against the government like the country experienced in 2011–2012, which prompted the first online censorship laws.

    What happens next:

    That’s the trillion-dollar question. Putin will sign the legislation into law, but it’s far from clear that creating a standalone internet is technologically possible or financially wise. Russia attempted to disconnect from the global internet in 2015 in a test case, but foreign data still managed to trickle in. And successfully pulling this off will require billions of rubles in investments by Moscow or the telecom industry, not counting any losses to the economy if testing the system causes service outages. Regardless, plenty of emerging markets will be watching the Russian test case closely. If Moscow pulls this off, other governments could be tempted to follow suit.

    The key number that explains it:

    Russia’s internet penetration rate is 78% and steadily growing, according to Pew Research Center. This makes it among the largest online populations in the world, in part because of state support to expand internet access over the past decades. With more Russians online, and with more conflict in cyberspace, the Russian government feels greater need to assert what it calls “digital sovereignty”—loosely defined, the right to control data and online content within its borders.

    The key quote that sums it all up:

    “What are rights? They’re the biggest lack of freedom. I can tell you that the more rights you have, the less free we are … A ban is when the person is free because it says ‘this is impossible, but with everything else — [you can] do what you want.’” Russian Senator Elena Mizulina, in defense of the country’s new internet laws.

    The one thing to read about it:

    Not all countries are in a position to even attempt to build their own internet—via high-tech filtering, data localization, or tinkering with network architecture— and opt for simply shutting down sites and social media platforms in times of crisis. We saw this just this week in Sri Lanka. Read this excellent piece by GZERO Media’s Alex Kliment on the pros and cons of shutting down the internet in times of emergency. Folks in the Kremlin should read it, too.

    The one major misconception about it:

    That Russians should brace for an internet that will soon be as restrictive as China’s. The reality is that the Chinese people have not really known any internet beyond the heavily censored one that has been in place since the 1990s. Russians, on the other hand, had a virtually uncensored internet up until 2012 or so. That makes the Kremlin wary of overplaying its hand … especially as internet privacy/freedom has been one of the few things that Russians have shown a willingness to protest over.

    The one thing to say about it at a party:

    The EU treats data privacy as a fundamental human right: GDPR allows users to see what data from them has been collected and to manage that data, and Europeans led the way on legislating the “right to be forgotten.” The US treats data privacy as the responsibility of tech companies and only moves to act once a significant breach has happened. Russia and China on the other hand see data privacy and state surveillance as inherently intertwined—the state is the basic actor online, and its users are subjects. As the internet continues to develop and become integrated into more and more aspects of our daily lives, these fundamentally differing views will clash more frequently. Brace yourselves.

  2. shinichi says:

    ロシアが「インターネット鎖国」を実現させると何が起きる?

    ロシアが自国のインターネットを海外から独立させる動きを強めており、実際に国全体を海外のインターネットから一時的に遮断する実験を検討中との報道もあった。しかし、こうした「インターネット鎖国」はロシアのインターネットを不便かつ脆弱するだけでなく、国外にも影響を及ぼす可能性がある。

    by Louise Matsakis

    translation by Shotaro Yamamoto

    WIRED (US)

    https://wired.jp/2019/03/18/russia-internet-disconnect/

    インターネットインフラには、中央権力と呼べるものがない。インターネットを機能させるには、全員が相互扶助するしかないのだ。結果として海底ケーブルや衛星がパッチワーク状になり、国境を無視して世界全体をつなげている。それゆえ多くの国は、オンラインでいるために自国のコントロールの及ばない国外の設備に頼るほかなくなる。

    それでも、国家が自国のインターネット環境に大きな干渉を試みることはたびたびある。そして、こうした試みがインターネットの遮断につながることも多い。

    例えば、2019年1月に実施されたコンゴ民主共和国の大統領選では、政府が選挙期間中にインターネット通信の遮断に踏み切った。そしてロシアも国全体を海外のインターネットから一時的に遮断する実験を行なおうしていると地元メディアが2月8日に報じた。

    ロシアの国土は広大であるうえ、ネットインフラの高度さもコンゴの比ではない。インターネットを遮断するとなれば膨大な労力を要すること、そして実行すれば無数の予期せぬ結果につながることも容易に想像がつく。

    いずれにせよ、このプロジェクトから見えてくるのは、グローバルインターネットがいかに複雑に、そして強力に絡み合っているかということである。

    ロシアが新法案で目指す「ルネットの独立」
    「一度強靭なネットインフラを構築すると、通信の遮断は想像以上に難しい作業となるケースが多いのです」と、インターネットソサエティ(Internet Society)の最高経営責任者(CEO)であるアンドリュー・サリヴァンは言う。インターネットソサエティはインターネットの広範な発展を推進している非営利団体である。

    ロシア国内のメディアの報道によると、インターネット遮断実験は12月に提出された新法案によるものだ。この法案は国内の各インターネットサーヴィスプロヴァイダー(ISP)に対して、ロシアのインターネット、すなわちルネット(Runet)の独立性の保障を求めるものである。

    規制はロシア国内のISPに対してふたつのことを命じている。ひとつは世界との通信を遮断するための技術を確立すること。もうひとつは、インターネットの通信経路をロシア連邦通信局(Roskomnadzor)の管轄するルーティングポイントを経由するものに組み替えられるようにすることである。

    報道によれば、ロシア当局は4月1日までにルネットと世界の通信を遮断する実験を行いたい構えのようだが、具体的な日程はいまだ公式に発表されていない。『WIRED』US版はロシア連邦通信局にコメントを求めているが、回答は得られなかった。

    2014年から準備を続けてきたロシアだが
    インターネットは米国で発明された。現在、世界のネットインフラの大部分は米国の企業によって管理されている。

    そんななかで、ロシアは単にルネットの独立性を高めようとしているだけかもしれないが、プーチン大統領がサイバー戦争に向けた「軍拡」をもくろんでいる可能性もある。あるいは、国民がインターネットを通じて入手する情報を統制しようとしている可能性も否定できない。

    詳しい動機はいまだ不明だが、ロシアが数年にわたってインターネット上での独立性を高めようと準備を進めていることは確かだ。実際、ロシアは2014年にはグローバルインターネットから独立する姿勢を表明していたのだ。

    しかし、実現に向けた課題はいまだに解決していない。

    「ロシア当局がしなくてはならないことは、大きくふたつです。ひとつは、ロシア国民がロシア内のコンテンツにしかアクセスできないようにすること。もうひとつは、あらゆる接続ポイントをロシア国内に置き、通信経路を国内に限定することです」と、ニューヨーク大学の教授で、『The Undersea Network』の著者でもあるニコール・スターロシルスキーは語る。

    ロシアはここ数年、実際にこのふたつに取り組んでいる。2014年には、企業がロシア国民の個人情報を集める際には、データをロシア国内に保存することを要求する法律が制定された(LinkedInのように、これを拒んだサイトにはロシア国内からアクセスできなくなった)。さらに、ロシアは独自のドメインネームシステム(DNS)を開発したとも報じられている。

    しかし、いくら入念に準備を重ねたとしても、世界をつなぐインターネットから実際に独立しようすれば、ほぼ確実に想定外の問題が起こるだろう。

    「そうなることはまず間違いないでしょう。ロシアの主要なネットインフラが突然機能停止する可能性は低いかもしれませんが、これもロシアが背負っているリスクのひとつではあります」と語るのは、ウィスコンシン大学マディソン校でコンピューターネットワークについて研究しているポール・バーフォード教授だ。

    インターネットプロヴァイダーが、国外のネットインフラすべての信頼性を詳細に把握するのは困難だ。「プロトコルスタックはすべての階層が複雑な構造をしているため、どこかしらに致命的な問題が発生する可能性があるのです」

    国外のサーヴィスを利用したサイトは利用不能に?
    金融機関、医療機関、航空機関などがネット接続不能になるなどの大問題が発生しなかったとしても、多くのウェブサイトが機能を停止する可能性がある。ほとんどのウェブページは複数のサーヴァーに依存して機能しており、これらのサーヴァーは世界中に散らばっている場合もあるからだ。

    例えば、ニュースサイトのなかにはアマゾン ウェブ サービス(AWS)が提供するクラウドサーヴァーや、グーグルのトラッキングソフトウェア、フェイスブックのコメント用プラグインを利用するものがある。もちろん、これらのサーヴィスはすべてロシア国外から提供されている。

    「それぞれが異なる膨大な数のものが集まって、ひとつのウェブページを構成しているんです。ロシアでウェブサイトを運営しようと考えるなら、その構成要素の所在地をすべて把握せねばならなくなります」と『Tubes: A Journey to the Center of the Internet』の著者であるアンドリュー・ブラムは話す。

    「脆いインターネット」のはじまり
    ロシア国外ではどういう影響があるだろうか。ロシアがグローバルインターネットから分離したとしても、米国が影響を受ける可能性は低い。しかし、ロシアを経由する通信網を利用している国では問題が起こる可能性がある。「ロシア国内だけの問題ではありません」とサリヴァンは言う。「ロシア国内を経由する接続はできなくなるかもしれないのです」

    完全に独立したインターネットを構築しようという試みは、事実上、既存のものよりも脆いインターネットを構築することになってしまっている。

    現行のグローバルインターネットは、通信経路が無数に用意されているため、移動している情報を完全に遮断するのは難しい。例えば、欧州と米国を結ぶ海底ケーブルが破損したとしても、別の経路を通って米国からフランスへとメールやアプリのメッセージを送信することができる。一方でロシアがつくりあげたいのは、すべての経路を把握し、意のままに遮断できるようなシステムなのだ。

    「そのようなシステムはネットワークの欠陥になります。新しいシステムは、インターネット上でロシアが占める領域の信頼性を損なうものになっています」とサリヴァンは言う。「遮断可能なインターネットシステムを構築するということは、意図せず遮断されうるインターネットシステムを導入するのと同じことなのです」

  3. shinichi says:

    Russia considers ‘unplugging’ from internet

    http://jbpress.ismedia.jp/articles/-/56239


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.