Elaine Aron

But what seems ordinary to others, like loud music or crowds, can be highly stimulating and thus stressful for HSPs.
Most people ignore sirens, glaring lights, strange odors, clutter and chaos. HSPs are disturbed by them.
Most people’s feet may be tired at the end of a day in a mall or a museum, but they’re ready for more when you suggest an evening party. HSPs need solitude after such a day. They feel jangled, overaroused.
Most people walk into a room and perhaps notice the furniture, the people—that’s about it. HSPs can be instantly aware, whether they wish to be or not, of the mood, the friendships and enmities, the freshness or staleness of the air, the personality of the one who arranged the flowers.
If you are an HSP, however, it is hard to grasp that you have some remarkable ability. How do you compare inner experiences? Not easily. Mostly you notice that you seem unable to tolerate as much as other people. You forget that you belong to a group that has often demonstrated great creativity, insight, passion, and caring—all highly valued by society.

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1 Response to Elaine Aron

  1. shinichi says:

    The Highly Sensitive Person: How to Thrive When the World Overwhelms You

    by Elaine Aron

    (1996)

    Stating that hypersensitivity is an asset rather than a flaw, a guide for the one out of every five people who is highly subject to his or her surroundings offers coping methods while explaining how to benefit from sensitivity-related personality traits.

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