Franz Kafka

“Now, if you will permit me,” said K., “I will ask you a rather rude question.”
The landlady remained silent.
“So I may not ask,” said K., “that’s enough for me, too.”
“Oh, of course,” said the landlady, “that’s enough for you, that especially. You misinterpret everything, even the silence. You simply cannot help it. I do give you permission to ask.”
“If I’m misinterpreting everything,” said K., “then perhaps I’m also misinterpreting my own question, perhaps it isn’t all that rude. I simply wanted to know how you met your husband and how this inn came into your hands.”

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1 Response to Franz Kafka

  1. shinichi says:

    The Castle

    by Franz Kafka

    The tale of K’s arrival in the village below the castle that seems to rule it is Kafka’s Magnum Opus. The study of relationships, particularly between the individual and society, and between thought and action, epitomizes Kafka’s vision of twentieth-century alienation and anxiety.


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