Mark Malloch-Brown

The nation state is under threat as the fundamental unit of international affairs. On one side a globalized world has confronted states with problems like climate change, borderless terrorism and international migration against which the traditional instruments of the sovereign state are inadequate. Together with the prize of greater trade these forces necessitate the upward transfer of power to regional security organizations, like NATO, or to trade organizations like the EU.
But as power is being devolved up to regional blocs, citizenship is being pulled the other way. New types of loyalty and association are challenging the state’s traditional role.
In the West there is evidence that the State has thrown in the towel. By contrast in China and Russia the state has, at least for now, answered back and asserted its power to give their citizens the answers they are looking for.
What does this strange state of the State mean for international affairs? Today’s challenged global order is both a cause and a consequence of the state’s current frailty. We are suddenly living again in a world of disorder where there is no clear, settled, balance of power.
To fix it, we need a new framework of institutions and rules in a world of competing organizational structures and state models. Naked state and bloc power could replace the international rule of law.

2 thoughts on “Mark Malloch-Brown

  1. shinichi Post author

    Threatened States in a Challenged Global Order

    by Mark Malloch-Brown

    Intersections

    The Hague Institute for Global Justice

    http://www.thehagueinstituteforglobaljustice.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/Intersections-Fall-2015.pdf

    The nation state is under threat as the fundamental unit of international affairs. On one side a globalized world has confronted states with problems like climate change, borderless terrorism and international migration against which the traditional instruments of the sovereign state are inadequate. Together with the prize of greater trade these forces necessitate the upward transfer of power to regional security organizations, like NATO, or to trade organizations like the EU, NAFTA or Mercosur/Pacific Alliance.

    But as power is being devolved up to regional blocs, citizenship is being pulled the other way. New types of loyalty and association are challenging the state’s traditional role. Some are geographic; there are at least 40 would-be Scotlands seeking separation of some kind from the countries in which they now find themselves. Other loyalties are based on other kindred identities – not just religious or ethnic, but based on shared commercial, political, or other interests.

    In the West there is evidence that the State has thrown in the towel, allowing the emergence of nonstate structures of power such as increasingly confident City governments in London and New York, vigorous human rights or environmental movements or pan national business organizations and their equally non-national regulators. By contrast in China and Russia the state has, at least for now, answered back and asserted its power to give their citizens the answers they are looking for. Both states are renewing their appeal for total loyalty.

    What does this strange state of the State mean for international affairs? Today’s challenged global order is both a cause and a consequence of the state’s current frailty. We are suddenly living again in a world of disorder where there is no clear, settled, balance of power. Our failure to act whether in Ukraine and Syria or against climate change or poverty is evidence the system is broken.

    To fix it, we need a new framework of institutions and rules in a world of competing organizational structures and state models. This reform should start at the UN Security Council. Without change it is easy to imagine a world in which increasingly weaker, smaller states must turn to powerful ones rather than the protection of any international order. Naked state and bloc power could replace the international rule of law.

    Reply
  2. shinichi Post author

    今起きているのは欧米型システムの崩壊だ

    旧来秩序は役に立たない

    by マーク・マロック・ブラウン

    週刊東洋経済

    (2014年11月29日)

    http://toyokeizai.net/articles/-/54587

    国家であることが難しく、国民であることはそれ以上に難しい時代である。国民の「忠誠」と交換に安全と基本的な福祉を古くから提供してきた国民国家が、国内で、また国際問題の基本単位としても脅威にさらされている。

    新しい種類の忠誠と連合が国家の伝統的役割に異議を唱えている。いくつかは地理的なものである。ヨーロッパだけでも、少なくとも40地域の“次のスコットランド”が、いま自分たちがいる国からの何らかの分離を模索している。単に宗教や民族ではなく、共通の商業的利害や政治的利害、またはその他の利害に基づくものである。NGO(非政府組織)のサポーターをしている者は、政党のメンバーよりもはるかに多い。

    ノーベル経済学賞受賞者のアマルティア・セン氏は、複数のアイデンティティとともに生きることを学び、市民権と忠誠の多様性を享受することで、われわれはさらに繁栄するだろう、と述べている。

    先進国の統治モデルへの批判

    しかしこの多様性は無害なものではない。欧米諸国の大半では、国家はますます国民を失望させ、多くの場合、手が届かないような福祉提供のモデルに固執している。世界の経済成長が立ち直る過程で、先進国の高コストで高税率、高利益な統治モデルが批判にさらされている。

    欧米諸国の欠点は、ほかの地域と比較した場合、極めて明白である。中国は「経済安全国家」を体現している。海外での投資力を用いて、自国の産業化を支える資源やエネルギーを確保しつつ、GDP(国内総生産)成長率と国民の支持を維持するために、国内貯蓄を家計消費に導くことを目指している。

    ロシアは古典的な国家の安全を重んじる国であり、欧米の不安をおもちゃのようにもてあそぶことで、ウクライナへの支配力を強め、公認の国家主義によって国内の反対を抑圧している。

    われわれは混乱の世界に生きている。欧米諸国のいくつかは、強力な統一国家に戻ることを切望しているかもしれないが、それは難しいだろう。

    中国やインドも、経済的成功の反面で中流階級の政治的野望が既存の枠組みを機能不全にするため、国家破滅を招くかもしれない。別の見方をすれば、世界の東側の半分が強力な権威主義国家構造に組織され、西側では連携によるポスト国家モデルが取り入れられている。

    競合する組織構造の世界に制度と規則の枠組みをどのように提供するのかが、国際統治における問題だ。

    旧来秩序は役に立たない。ロシアは国連安全保障理事会という国家ベースの最高位の国際機関を、ウクライナ問題では脇に追いやり、シリア問題では手詰まりにさせた。政治家の喧噪とは別に、ロシア人たちが望むことは、世界貿易とテクノロジーの黄金時代の恩恵を家族に提供し享受させてくれる、平和で予測可能な国際秩序ではないだろうか。

    国家のハードパワーが、国境を越えたアイデア、発明、融資のソフトパワーと競い合う世界には、規律が必要だ。NGOが正式な役割を持つような世界秩序を設計する勇気を奮い起こすべきだ。さもないと、(防衛費の拡大やグローバルな機会損失の形で)ツケは高くつく。国家が「力は正義なり」のアプローチを追求し続け、必要な金融規制や環境保護義務を回避する結果を招いてしまう。

    悪行は国家だけではない

    悪行は国家だけではない。国境を越えた経済活動は、規制から逃れようとする者たちに、ビジネスだけでなく組織犯罪などの機会も与えてしまった。

    現状では米国が、司法制度の域外適用と国際金融制度の管理に頼って、国境での司法問題に対処する役割を演じている。だが、これでは不十分だ。

    必要なのは、政府と民間の利害関係者によって考案された規則、規範、制度の正当なシステムである。経済、政治、社会活動のグローバルな性質を反映することで、非国家的構造のパッチワークと共存していかなければならないのだ。

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.