Andrew J. Bacevich

Reality turns out to be considerably more complicated. In practice, civilian control—expectations that the brass, having rendered advice, will then loyally execute whatever decision the commander-in-chief makes—is at best a useful fiction.
In front of the curtain, the generals and admirals defer; behind the curtain, on all but the smallest of issues, the military’s collective leadership pursue their own agenda informed by their own convictions of what is good for the country and, by extension, for the institutions over which they preside. In this regard, the Pentagon’s behavior does not differ from that of automakers, labor unions, the movie business, environmental groups, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, the Israel lobby, or the NAACP.

This entry was posted in american way. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Andrew J. Bacevich

  1. shinichi says:

    Civilian Control? Surely, You Jest.

    by Andrew J. Bacevich

    (2010)

    https://newrepublic.com/article/77086/civilian-control-american-power-barack-obama

    The principle of civilian control forms the foundation of the American system of civil-military relations, offering assurance that the nation’s very powerful armed forces and its very influential officer corps pose no danger to our democracy. That’s the theory at least, the one that gets printed in civics books and peddled to the plain folk out in Peoria.

    Reality turns out to be considerably more complicated. In practice, civilian control—expectations that the brass, having rendered advice, will then loyally execute whatever decision the commander-in-chief makes—is at best a useful fiction.

    In front of the curtain, the generals and admirals defer; behind the curtain, on all but the smallest of issues, the military’s collective leadership pursue their own agenda informed by their own convictions of what is good for the country and, by extension, for the institutions over which they preside. In this regard, the Pentagon’s behavior does not differ from that of automakers, labor unions, the movie business, environmental groups, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, the Israel lobby, or the NAACP.

    In Washington, only one decision is considered really final—and that’s the one that goes your way. Senior military officers understand these rules and play by them. When the president or secretary of defense acts in ways not to their liking—killing some sought-after weapons program, for example—they treat that decision as subject to review and revision.

    To overturn or modify a policy they judge objectionable, military leaders forge alliances with like-minded members of Congress, for whom the national interest tends to coincide with whatever benefits their constituents. Senior officers also make their case by working the press, not infrequently by leaking material that will embarrass or handcuff their nominal superiors.

    Sometimes, the military strikes preemptively, attempting to influence decisions not yet made. A classic example occurred in 1993: Led by General Colin Powell, then chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the senior uniformed leadership mounted a fierce and very effective campaign to prevent President Bill Clinton from acting on his announced intention to allow gays to serve openly in the military. Powell and his confreres prevailed. A humiliated Clinton beat a hasty retreat and, thereafter, took care not to court trouble with an officer corps that made little effort to conceal its lack of fondness for him.

    A more recent example occurred just a year ago. With President Obama agonizing over what to do about Afghanistan, The Washington Post offered for general consumption the military’s preferred approach, the so-called McChrystal Plan. Devised by General Stanley McChrystal, who had been appointed by Obama to command allied forces in Afghanistan, the plan called for a surge of U.S. troops and the full-fledged application of counterinsurgency doctrine—an approach that necessarily implied a much longer and more costly war.

    The effect of this leak, almost surely engineered by some still unidentified military officer, was to hijack the entire policy review process, circumscribing the choices available to the commander-in-chief. Rushing to the nearest available microphone, members of Congress (mostly Republicans) announced that it was Obama’s duty to give the field commander whatever he wanted. McChrystal himself made the point explicitly. During a speech in London, he categorically rejected the notion that any alternative to his strategy even existed: It was do it his way or lose the war. The role left to the president was not to decide, but simply to affirm.

    The leaking of the McChrystal Plan constituted a direct assault on civilian control. At the time, however, that fact passed all but unnoticed. Few of those today raising a hue-and-cry about PFC Bradley Manning, the accused WikiLeak-er, bothered to protest. The documents that Manning allegedly made public are said to endanger the lives of American troops and their Afghan comrades. Yet, a year ago, no one complained about the McChrystal leaker providing Osama bin Laden and the Taliban leadership with a detailed blueprint of exactly how the United States and its allies were going to prosecute their war.

    The absence of any serious complaint reflected the fact that, in Washington—especially in the press corps—military leaks aimed at subverting or circumscribing civilian authority are accepted as standard fare. It’s part of the way Washington works.

    Which brings us to the present and to what is stacking up to be an episode likely to reveal a great deal about how much or how little actual civilian control currently exists. In adopting the McChrystal Plan, Obama added this caveat: U. S. troops will begin withdrawing from Afghanistan by July 2011. Before the president or anyone in his administration had explained exactly what that July 2011 deadline signifies, General McChrystal departed the scene, having violated the dictum that calls on senior officers to sustain, in public at least, the pretense of respecting civilians.

    To replace McChrystal—and to forestall the growing impression that things in Afghanistan are falling apart—Obama appointed General David Petraeus, an officer possessing in abundance the finesse and political savvy that McChrystal lacks. Having now sacked two successive commanders in Afghanistan, Obama can hardly afford to fire a third, least of all someone of Petraeus’s exalted stature. It would be akin to benching Tom Brady or trading Derek Jeter. You might be able to pull it off, but not without paying a very severe price. You might even find yourself out of a job.

    Within the past week, complaints dribbling out of Petraeus’s headquarters in Kabul—duly reported by an accommodating press—indicate growing military unhappiness with the July 2011 pullout date. Now, Petraeus himself has begun to weigh in directly. This past weekend, he launched his own media campaign, offering his “narrative” of ongoing events. Unlike the ham-handed McChrystal, who chose a foreign capital as his soapbox, Petraeus sat for a carefully orchestrated series of interviews with The New York Times, The Washington Post, and NBC’s “Meet the Press,” each of which gratefully passed along the general’s view of things.

    In the course of sitting for these interviews, Petraeus placed down a marker, one best captured by the headline in the Times dispatch: “Petraeus Opposes a Rapid Pullout in Afghanistan.” Or, as The Daily Beast put it, adding a twist of hyperbole, Petraeus told “David Gregory that he has the right to delay Obama’s 2011 pull-out target for troops in Afghanistan.” A bit over the top, but you get the drift.

    Dexter Filkins of the Times interpreted Petraeus’s comments as “a preview of what promise[s] to be an intense political battle over the future of the American-led war in Afghanistan.” The operative word in that statement is “political,” with the stakes potentially including not only the ongoing war, but an upcoming presidential election.

    At the center of that battle will be a very political general, skilled at using the press and with friends aplenty on Capitol Hill, especially among Republicans. To have a chance of winning reelection in 2012, Obama needs to demonstrate progress in shutting down the war. Yet it is now becoming increasingly apparent the general Obama has placed in charge of that war entertains a different view.

    One, but not both, will have his way. Between now and July 2011, when it comes to civilian control, even the folks in Peoria will have a chance to learn what the civics books leave out.

  2. shinichi says:

    稲田防衛相辞任で「一件落着」にはならない3つの理由

    「これは陸自のクーデターだ」と防衛省幹部は嘆いた

    by 部谷直亮

    文春オンライン

    http://bunshun.jp/articles/-/3551

    「稲田大臣を守れなかった」

     防衛省のある内局官僚(背広組)は、そういう風な感想を力なく抱いたという。そして、「これは敗北だ。明らかに陸幕(陸上幕僚監部)の一部が策謀したクーデターだ。今後、一部のリークによって大臣、事務次官、陸幕長を排除できるような前例が残ってしまった。本来なら、日報などの日々の部隊活動に関する報告をどうするか、稲田大臣には責任をもって決めていただくべきだったのに」とも嘆いた。

     メディアでは、稲田朋美氏は史上最低の防衛大臣だったという報道がなされている。もちろん、悪評がたくさんあるのは事実である。大臣周辺の陸上自衛隊(陸自)幹部は、稲田氏に「ゴジラ」というあだ名をつけていたという。巨大不明生物「ゴジラ」は自衛隊発足以来の敵であり、破壊者であるから、その辟易ぶりがうかがわれる。また、自衛隊幹部(制服組)や内局でも批判的な声があったのは著者も耳にしている。

     しかし、統合幕僚監部(統幕)や防衛省内局では、今回の件については辞任した稲田前大臣よりも、陸自側の不手際――南スーダンPKO活動に関する情報公開を請求された際、「日報」に関する記述を黒塗りにしなかったため、そこから「日報」の存在が判明し、さらなる情報公開請求を招いたことなど――とその後の度重なるメディアへの真偽不明のリークを責める声が大きいようだ。要するに矛先を稲田氏にばかり向けるのはお門違いではないか、という主張である。

     また、最前線を始めとする各現場では「こうした泥仕合が日本のために、陸自のためになるのか」「現場では文書管理をきわめて厳密に行っているのに、中央では政治目的でマスコミにリークするのはいかがなものか」といった疑問の声も聞かれる。

    問題の本質は、稲田前大臣の資質ではない

     これらの事実は何を物語るのだろうか。それは稲田前大臣の資質問題が過剰にクローズアップされてしまい、その他の問題は吹き飛んでしまったということである。では、何が見落とされているのか。

     第1は、省内の不信感である。今回の問題は防衛省・自衛隊内に深刻な禍根を残した。統幕と内局内では、今回の件を陸自によるリークだと憎み、リークをしたとされる陸幕の一部からすれば責任を押し付けられたと反発している。

     そして、現場の幹部と隊員達からすれば、中央は何をやっているのか!という不信と疑念の思いが高まった。実際、こうした声は多く耳にする。今後の士気と規律をどうするのかという問題が残された。

     第2は、稲田前大臣の資質やキャラクターを嫌悪して一日でも早い辞職を求めるあまり、政治目的でのリークが何をもたらすかを考えない、きわめて近視眼的な言動が省内外で見受けられたことである。

     なるほど、稲田氏の資質には疑問符がつく。だが、軍人がリークによって政策決定の変更を強制することは、米国の政軍関係論の多くが「文民統制(シビリアン・コントロール)をむしばむ危険な行為」とみなしている。ボストン大学教授のアンドリュー・ベースビッチは、「現代における実際の政軍関係の問題は、軍部というものが、自動車メーカー、労働組合、映画産業、環境保護団体、宗教組織、マイノリティ団体、イスラエルロビー等と、自らの信念に基づいた自分たちの政策を進展しようと画策するという意味では何ら変わりがない」と指摘する。

     軍人たちは、これらの団体と同様に――しかも彼らは軍事力という強大な力を持っていることで他の団体とは一線を画している――自らが必要とする装備品の調達等を大統領や国防長官が潰した際に、国会議員やメディアに公然・非公然の区別すらなく働きかけ、リークすら行うことで自らの主張を通そうとする。まだなされていない決定に対しても先制攻撃として行われる場合もある。そうベースビッチは指摘している。

     しかるに、今回の事件は、防衛省内の一部の勢力によるリークが意図的であれ結果的であれ安倍首相の政権を不安定化させ、防衛大臣・陸幕長・事務次官をクビにしてしまった。ベースビッチのいう政策決定への影響を超えている。まさしく国民への説明を口実にした「クーデターまがい」と言うべき直接攻撃である。

     そして、最後に指摘しなければならないのは、そもそも、このような前例ができてしまったことの重大性だ。2・26事件や満州事変による軍部の暴走がもたらした帰結を考えればわかるだろう。

    イギリスでは10年間非公開

     第3は、今後、日本がPKO活動はおろか、有事の際にまともな戦争ができなくなる可能性があるということである。この点は多くの自衛隊幹部・内局部員が共通して懸念している。今回、メディアと野党は、初めて「日報」という存在に気が付いた。しかも、大臣と政権のクビを取れる文書としてである。今後の海外派遣に際しては日報、重要影響事態や武力攻撃事態等の日本有事に際しては戦闘詳報・要報(個別の戦闘に関する報告)の公開を求めてくるだろうし、今回公開してしまったからには出さざるを得なくなるだろう。重要な事態が起こればなおさらである。

     しかし、英国では同様の文書が10年間非公開になっているように、現在進行形の作戦を公開すること自体が国際的な感覚にそぐわず、諸外国からの不信を買う。なぜならば、日報には、部隊がどこにいるか、補給物資や弾がどれくらいあるか、といった部隊の安全に関わる情報が満載されているからである。現地の武装勢力にとっては、日本やその協力国の軍隊を襲撃する参考情報にもなり、諸外国の軍隊の安全や世論にも影響を与えかねないのである。特に戦闘詳報・要報はより深刻だ。公開されれば日本と戦争中の相手はこれに付け込むだろうし、米軍が激しい不信を我が国に抱くのは間違いない。

     この結果、何が起きるかは明白である。まず、今回のことがトラウマになり海外派遣に二の足を踏むようになる。これだけの騒ぎを経験しても自衛隊を送り込みたい物好きな政権はないだろう。次に、日報なり戦闘詳報には何も書かなくなってしまう。

     どれも深刻だ。前者は、日本が国際的責任を果たせなくなる。後者は日本の責任が問われる事態になった際に、それを証明する公的文書が存在しないことになる。また、将来や現在の自衛官たちが貴重な戦訓を得られなくなるからである。

     これらの懸案を回避するには、新大臣による奮起が求められる。まずは省内の綱紀粛正と人心掌握の再確立だ。内局と陸・海・空の各幕僚監部の関係も見直す必要がある。稲田氏は、辞任会見で今後「日報」を10年間保存すると述べたが、その公開ルールについて精緻に議論し、即時公開といった運用を避けること。何も情報を隠蔽しろというわけではなく、世界標準に合わせるべきであるという主張だ。今回の安倍首相や稲田前大臣に政治的ダメージを与えようとしたリークの犯人を特定し厳罰を処し後世への警告とすること。そして、何よりもあるべき文民統制の姿を議論し、コンセンサスを作っていくことが肝要であろう。

     稲田前大臣の資質は、秋になれば過去の話である。しかし、防衛省・自衛隊、そして海外派遣は、この国が続く限り、付き合っていかねばならぬ問題である。どうか、これで一件落着として、今回のリークの責任や今後の文書公開のあり方がウヤムヤにならぬように願いたい。

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.