Carlo Rovelli

We are stories, contained within the twenty complicated centimeters behind our eyes, lines drawn by traces left by the (re)mingling together of things in the world, and oriented toward predicting events in the future, toward the direction of increasing entropy, in a rather particular corner of this immense, chaotic universe.
This space—memory—combined with our continuous process of anticipation, is the source of our sensing time as time, and ourselves as ourselves. Think about it: our introspection is easily capable of imagining itself without there being space or matter, but can it imagine itself not existing in time?

5 thoughts on “Carlo Rovelli

  1. shinichi Post author

    The Order of Time

    by Carlo Rovelli

     
     
     
     
     
     

    I have an enduring passion for Anaximander, the Greek philosopher who lived twenty-six centuries ago and understood that the Earth floats in space, supported by nothing. We know of Anaximander’s thought from other writers. Only one small original fragment of his writings has survived—just one:

    Things are transformed one into another according to necessity,

    and render justice to one another according to the order of time.

    “According to the order of time” (κατὰ τὴν τοῦ χρόνου τάξιν). From one of the crucial, initial moments of natural science there remains nothing but these obscure, arcanely resonant words, this appeal to the “order of time.”

    Astronomy and physics have since developed by following this seminal lead given by Anaximander: by understanding how phenomena occur according to the order of time. In antiquity, astronomy described the movements of stars in time. The equations of physics describe how things change in time. From the equations of Newton, which establish the foundations of mechanics, to those of Maxwell for electromagnetic phenomena; from Schrödinger’s equation describing how quantum phenomena evolve, to those of quantum field theory for the dynamics of subatomic particles: the whole of our physics, and science in general, is about how things develop “according to the order of time.”

    It has long been the convention to indicate this time in equations with the letter t (the word for “time” begins with t in Italian, French, and Spanish, but not in German, Arabic, Russian, or Mandarin). What does this t stand for? It stands for the number measured by a clock. The equations tell us how things change as the time measured by a clock passes.

    Reply
  2. shinichi Post author

    Boundless worlds.

    They are those worlds that the young Marcel rediscovers, bewildered, every morning, in the first pages of Remembrance of Things Past, in the vertigo of the moment when consciousness emerges like a bubble from unfathomable depths. That world of which vast territories are then revealed to him when the taste of the madeleine brings back to him the flavor of Combray. A vast world, a map of which Proust slowly unfolds during the course of the three thousand pages of his great novel. A novel, it should be noted, that is not a narrative of events in the world but an account of what’s inside the memory of a single person. From the fragrance of the madeleine at the beginning, to the last word—“time”—of its final part, “Time Regained,” the book is nothing but a disordered, detailed meandering among the synapses of Marcel’s brain.

    Proust finds a limitless space and an incredible throng of details, fragrances, considerations, sensations, reflections, re-elaborations, colors, objects, names, looks, emotions . . . all within the folds of the brain between the ears of Marcel. This is the flow of time familiar from our experience: it is inside there that it nestles, inside of us, in the utterly crucial presence of traces of the past in our neurons.

    Proust could not be more explicit on this matter, writing in the first book: “Reality is formed only by memory.” And memory, in its turn, is a collection of traces, an indirect product of the disordering of the world, of that small equation written earlier, ΔS ≥ 0, the one that tells us the state of the world was in a “particular” configuration in the past and therefore has left (and leaves) traces. “Particular,” that is, perhaps only in relation to rare subsystems—ourselves included.

    We are stories, contained within the twenty complicated centimeters behind our eyes, lines drawn by traces left by the (re)mingling together of things in the world, and oriented toward predicting events in the future, toward the direction of increasing entropy, in a rather particular corner of this immense, chaotic universe.

    This space—memory—combined with our continuous process of anticipation, is the source of our sensing time as time, and ourselves as ourselves. Think about it: our introspection is easily capable of imagining itself without there being space or matter, but can it imagine itself not existing in time?

    It is with respect to that physical system to which we belong—due to the peculiar way in which it interacts with the rest of the world, thanks to the fact that it allows traces and because we, as physical entities, consist of memory and anticipation—that the perspective of time opens up for us, like our small, lit clearing. Time opens up our limited access to the world. Time, then, is the form in which we beings, whose brains are made up essentially of memory and foresight, interact with the world: it is the source of our identity.

    And of our suffering as well.

    Buddha summed this up in a few maxims that millions of human beings have adopted as the foundations of their lives: birth is suffering, decline is suffering, illness is suffering, death is suffering, union with that which we hate is suffering, separation from that which we love is suffering, failure to obtain what we desire is suffering. It’s suffering because we must lose what we have and are attached to. Because everything that begins must end. What causes us to suffer is not in the past or the future: it is here, now, in our memory, in our expectations. We long for timelessness, we endure the passing of time: we suffer time. Time is suffering.

    Such is time, and because of this we are fascinated and troubled by it in equal measure—and perhaps because of this, too, dear reader, my brother, my sister, you are holding this book in your hands. Because it is nothing but a fleeting structure of the world, an ephemeral fluctuation in the happening of the world, that which is capable of giving rise to what we are: beings made of time. That to which we owe our being, giving us the precious gift of our very existence, allowing us to create the fleeting illusion of permanence that is the origin of all our suffering.

    Reply
  3. shinichi Post author

    時間は存在しない

    by カルロ・ロヴェッリ

    translated by 冨永 星

    時間はいつでもどこでも同じように経過するわけではなく、
    過去から未来へと流れるわけでもない――。
     
     

    Reply
  4. shinichi Post author

    “時間”の再解釈:天才カルロ・ロヴェッリが指南する“クオンタムネイティヴ”へのマインドセット

    スティーヴン・ホーキングの再来と評される物理学者カルロ・ロヴェッリ。一般相対性理論と量子力学を統一すべく物理学者がしのぎを削る「量子の重力理論」のひとつ、「ループ量子重力理論」を唱える彼は、著書『時間は存在しない』で客観的で確実な空間や時間はこの世界に存在しないと説いた。一人ひとりが違う時空間を生きていると主張するロヴェッリが考える、2020年代に必須のFUTURES LITERACYとは?(雑誌『WIRED』日本版Vol.36より転載)

    FUTURES LITERACY

    2020.03.19 THU 17:00
    INTERVIEW BY MICHIAKI MATSUSHIMA
    TRANSLATION BY ERINA ANSCOMB

    https://wired.jp/2020/03/19/quantum-gravity-will-shape-the-world-carlorovelli/

    デジタルと量子のゼロイチについて(Quantum Physics)

    QUESTION_1:
    ここ四半世紀のイノヴェイションを支えてきたデジタル革命は、いわゆる「ゼロとイチの世界」でしたが、量子の世界は「ゼロでもありイチでもある状態が現れる世界」です。こうした「量子の世界」を正しく“想像力の源”に使うことで、人間はデジタル時代とは違う、新たな世界観を獲得できるでしょうか?

    ANSWER_1:
    半導体をはじめ、デジタル革命を実現させるテクノロジーは、量子力学に基づいています。量子論を理解せずして、人類はコンピューターを手にすることはできませんでした。しかし、量子論はその程度のものではありません。デジタル記述されたコードより、はるかに大きな可能性をもっているのです。そして、その大部分をわたしたちの文化は吸収できていません。

    量子論は、わたしたちが自然を理解する方法に甚大な変化をもたらします。つまり、現実についてわたしたちが描いてきたものに、ラディカルで深い再考を迫るのです。ただわたしたちにはそれがどういうことなのか、まだ明確にはわかりません。そしてこれこそが、量子論がもつメッセージが一般に理解されるまでに時間がかかっている理由だと思います。

    QUESTION_2:
    量子物理学の登場はおよそ100年前ですが、2020年代に期待されるブレークスルーは何でしょうか?

    ANSWER_2:
    量子物理学と相対性理論のこれだけの進展について、20世紀初めには誰も予想できなかったように、今後のブレークスルーが何かについては誰にもわかりません。しかし量子重力理論は、これまでわたしたちの中心にあった時間や空間の役割を塗り替え、世界をひもとき、未来をかたちづくる役目を果たすのだろうと思います。

    一人ひとりの時空間を生きること(Time and Space)

    QUESTION_3:
    一般相対性理論と量子力学を統一しようとする量子重力理論のうち、あなたが唱えるループ量子重力理論は、よく知られる超ひも理論と違い、時間や空間の存在の絶対性自体を問うものです。そもそも人類とは、時空の制約から逃れたい、自由になりたいと究極的には希求するものでしょうか?

    ANSWER_3:
    ループ量子重力理論が示す結論は、時間や空間の性質に対してかなり過激です。量子論を深く考察すると従来の時間や空間の捉え方に従うことはできず、思考を完全に変える必要があります。例えば、ループ量子重力理論の基礎方程式には、時間がまったく存在しません。

    超ひも理論は、ここ数十年かなり注目されていましたが、期待されていた超対称性の発見に至っていないことで、多くの疑問を残しました。個人的見解ですが、物理学における「万物の理論」を導くのに充分なほど、わたしたちはこの世界を理解できてはいません。このワード(万物の理論)はまだ謎に満ちており、それはそれで好ましいことでしょう。

    一方で、量子力学と一般相対性理論は、ミクロな時間や空間の“離散的”なふるまい方を説明するのに充分なほど信頼に足るもので、その点はすでに明白です。

    仰るとおり、わたしは時間や空間の制約から自由になろうとするのが人間の本質だと考えます。少なくとも、思考のなかにおいては、ですが。そして従来のような空間や時間についての仮定を抜きに、「実在性(=客観的な物事の在り方)」を理解するべきでしょう。もちろん、日常生活においては、従来のような空間と時間に対する理解の仕方でいても問題はありません。しかし、これらはあくまでも近似値にすぎないことを認識しておくべきです。

    QUESTION_4:
    ヴァーチャルリアリティ(VR)や拡張現実(AR)、多様な複合現実(MR)が生まれるなかで、この「現実」ですらリアルリアリティ(Real Reality)という複数存在する“現実のひとつ”になりつつあります。リアリティが複数ある時代を、人類はどう生きるべきでしょうか?

    ANSWER_4:
    わたしたち全員が、すでに複数存在するリアリティのなかで生きています。なぜなら、わたしたちの世界の見方はそれぞれ異なっているからです。これまでも人間は、たとえ考え方や世界観が違っても一緒に生活を続けてきました。実際、一人ひとり違うことこそが、ともに生きる上での素晴らしい点です。みんながみんな同じ見方をしたら、本当につまらない世界になってしまいますから!

    未来をどう構想するか(After Anthropocene)

    QUESTION_5:
    未来を学び、構想し、選び取り、ツールを手にし、動きだす一連の行動を“FUTURES LITERACY”とするときに、ぼくたちはそれをどうすれば手にすることができるでしょう。著書『時間は存在しない』に書かれたように、「過去」や「未来」といったものが、もともと世界に内在するわけではなく、自分という存在自体がつくり出すものでしかないとすれば、わたしたちはどうやって独りよがりではない「未来」を考えることができるでしょうか?

    ANSWER_5:
    人間は、時間的視点のなかで生きざるをえません。なぜなら、人間という存在そのものが、時間的視点によってつくられたものだからです。わたしたちのマインドは時間のなかで生じる“現象”であり、時間の間隔というものがなければ、思考も存在しません。

    一方で、わたしたちの視点がいかに人為的で先入観にとらわれたものであるか、知っておく必要があります。現実は、わたしたちが直感によって得たその近似値よりもはるかに複雑だからです。だから、いまいちばん大切なFUTURES LITERACYは、幅広い文化を構成するあらゆる要素を集約し、整然とさせる能力だと思います。単一の視点で先走らないことが大切なのです。

    QUESTION_6:
    時間を生み出すものが人間の意識であるとすれば、「意識とは何か」という人類の難問について、次の10年で答えは得られるでしょうか。それには、どんな科学的、あるいは哲学的アプローチが有望でしょうか?

    ANSWER_6:
    間違いなく神経科学的アプローチでしょうね。この点について、量子論はあまり関係ないと思います。わたしたちは、“意識”とは何かを身振り手振りで表現しようとし、「直感的に明らかだ」と言ったりしますが、いまだにはっきりと定義できていません。意識の問題は、わたしたちが間違った方法で定式化しようとしていることに気が付くことで理解できるでしょう。

    QUESTION_7:
    生物学者のヤーコプ・フォン・ユクスキュルが提唱した「環世界」のように、人間だけでなくあらゆる動植物や地球(ガイア)もそれぞれ独自の時間や空間のなかに生きているとしたら、人間中心主義といわれる現代に、人間の視点や人間中心の世界を超えて未来を構想することはどうやって可能になるでしょうか?

    ANSWER_7:
    わたしたちが人間中心の視座からすでに抜け出していると、願ってやみません。人間はかつて、地球が宇宙の中心だとか、人間はほかの動物と大きく異なるだとかと考えていましたが、そうではないことに気づきました。

    それに、これまでわたしたち“生命”はとても「特別なもの」だと考えていましたが、いまや、どうやらそうではないのかもしれないと気づき始めています。わたしたち人類は、宇宙で起きているさまざまな事象のなかの、ほんの小さな事象のひとつにすぎないのです。

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.