Matthew Hodgson

Ultimately, it’s hard to predict what final direction Web 3.0 will take us, and that’s precisely the point. By unlocking the web from the hands of a few players this will inevitably enable a surge in innovation and let services flourish which prioritise the user’s interests.
Apple, Google, Microsoft, and others have their own interests at heart (as they should), but that means that the user can often be viewed purely as a source of revenue, quite literally at the users’ expense.
As the Decentralised Web attracts the interest and passion of the mainstream developer community, there is no telling what new economies will emerge and what kinds of new technologies and services they will invent. The one certainty is they will intrinsically support their communities and user bases just as much as the interests of their creators.

This entry was posted in information. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Matthew Hodgson

  1. shinichi says:

    A decentralized web would give power back to the people online

    by Matthew Hodgson

    https://techcrunch.com/2016/10/09/a-decentralized-web-would-give-power-back-to-the-people-online/

    Recently, Google launched a video calling tool (yes, another one). Google Hangouts has been sidelined to Enterprise, and Google Duo is supposed to be the next big thing in video calling.

    So now we have Skype from Microsoft, Facetime from Apple, and Google with Duo. Each big company has its own equivalent service, each stuck in its own bubble. These services may be great, but they aren’t exactly what we imagined during the dream years when the internet was being built.

    The original purpose of the web and internet, if you recall, was to build a common neutral network which everyone can participate in equally for the betterment of humanity. Fortunately, there is an emerging movement to bring the web back to this vision and it even involves some of the key figures from the birth of the web. It’s called the Decentralised Web or Web 3.0, and it describes an emerging trend to build services on the internet which do not depend on any single “central” organisation to function.

    So what happened to the initial dream of the web? Much of the altruism faded during the first dot-com bubble, as people realised that an easy way to create value on top of this neutral fabric was to build centralised services which gather, trap and monetise information.

    Search Engines (e.g. Google), Social Networks (e.g. Facebook), Chat Apps (e.g. WhatsApp) have grown huge by providing centralised services on the internet. For example, Facebook’s future vision of the internet is to provide access only to the subset of centralised services it endorses (Internet.org and Free Basics).

    Meanwhile, it disables fundamental internet freedoms such as the ability to link to content via a URL (forcing you to share content only within Facebook) or the ability for search engines to index its contents (other than the Facebook search function).

    The Decentralised Web envisions a future world where services such as communication, currency, publishing, social networking, search, archiving etc are provided not by centralised services owned by single organisations, but by technologies which are powered by the people: their own community. Their users.

    The core idea of decentralisation is that the operation of a service is not blindly trusted to any single omnipotent company. Instead, responsibility for the service is shared: perhaps by running across multiple federated servers, or perhaps running across client side apps in an entirely “distributed” peer-to-peer model.

    Even though the community may be “byzantine” and not have any reason to trust or depend on each other, the rules that describe the decentralised service’s behaviour are designed to force participants to act fairly in order to participate at all, relying heavily on cryptographic techniques such as Merkle trees and digital signatures to allow participants to hold each other accountable.

    There are three fundamental areas that the Decentralised Web necessarily champions:privacy, data portability and security.

    • Privacy: Decentralisation forces an increased focus on data privacy. Data is distributed across the network and end-to-end encryption technologies are critical for ensuring that only authorized users can read and write. Access to the data itself is entirely controlled algorithmically by the network as opposed to more centralized networks where typically the owner of that network has full access to data, facilitating customer profiling and ad targeting.
    • Data Portability: In a decentralized environment, users own their data and choose with whom they share this data. Moreover they retain control of it when they leave a given service provider (assuming the service even has the concept of service providers). This is important. If I want to move from General Motors to BMW today, why should I not be able to take my driving records with me? The same applies to chat platform history or health records.
    • Security: Finally, we live in a world of increased security threats. In a centralized environment, the bigger the silo, the bigger the honeypot is to attract bad actors. Decentralized environments are safer by their general nature against being hacked, infiltrated, acquired, bankrupted or otherwise compromised as they have been built to exist under public scrutiny from the outset.

    Just as the internet itself triggered a grand re-levelling, taking many disparate unconnected local area networks and providing a new neutral common ground that linked them all, now we see the same pattern happening again as technology emerges to provide a new neutral common ground for higher level services. And much like Web 2.0, the first wave of this Web 3.0 invasion has walked among us for several years already.

    Git is wildly successful as an entirely decentralised version control system – almost entirely replacing centralised systems such as Subversion. Bitcoin famously demonstrates how a currency can exist without any central authority, contrasting with a centralised incumbent such as Paypal. Diaspora aims to provide a decentralised alternative to Facebook. Freenet paved the way for decentralised websites, email and file sharing.

    Less famously, StatusNet (now called GNU Social) provides a decentralised alternative to Twitter. XMPP was built to provide a decentralised alternative to the messaging silos of AOL Instant Messenger, ICQ, MSN, and others.

    However, these technologies have always sat on the fringe — favourites for the geeks who dreamt them up and are willing to forgive their mass market shortcomings, but frustratingly far from being mainstream. The tide is turning . The public zeitgeist is finally catching up with the realisation that being entirely dependent on massive siloed community platforms is not entirely in the users’ best interests.

    Critically, there is a new generation of Decentralised Startups that have got the attention of the mainstream industry, heralding in the new age for real.

    Blockstack and Ethereum show how Blockchain can be so much more than just a cryptocurrency, acting as a general purpose set of building blocks for building decentralised systems that need strong consensus. IPFS and the Dat Project provide entirely decentralised data fabrics, where ownership and responsibility for data is shared by all those accessing it rather than ever being hosted in a single location.

    The real step change in the current momentum came in June at the Decentralised Web Summit organised by the Internet Archive. The event brought together many of the original “fathers of the internet and World Wide Web” to discuss ways to “Lock the web open” and reinvent a web “that is more reliable, private, and fun.”

    Brewster Kahle, the founder of the Internet Archive, saw first hand the acceleration in decentralisation technologies whilst considering how to migrate the centralised Internet Archive to instead be decentralised: operated and hosted by the community who uses it rather being a fragile and vulnerable single service.

    Additionally, the enthusiastic presence of Tim Berners-Lee, Vint Cerf, Brewster himself and many others of the old school of the internet at the summit showed that for the first time the shift to decentralisation had caught the attention and indeed endorsement of the establishment.

    Tim Berners-Lee said:

    The web was designed to be decentralised so that everybody could participate by having their own domain and having their own webserver and this hasn’t worked out. Instead, we’ve got the situation where individual personal data has been locked up in these silos. […] The proposal is, then, to bring back the idea of a decentralised web.

    To bring back power to people. We are thinking we are going to make a social revolution by just tweaking: we’re going to use web technology, but we’re going to use it in such a way that we separate the apps that you use from the data that you use.

    We now see the challenge is to mature these new technologies and bring them fully to the mass market. Commercially there is huge value to be had in decentralisation: whilst the current silos may be washed away, new ones will always appear on top of the new common ground, just as happened with the original Web.

    Github is the posterchild for this: a $2 billion company built entirely as a value-added service on top of the decentralised technology of Git — despite users being able to trivially take their data and leave at any point.

    Similarly, we expect to see the new wave of companies providing decentralised infrastructure and commercially viable services on top, as new opportunities emerge in this brave new world.

    Ultimately, it’s hard to predict what final direction Web 3.0 will take us, and that’s precisely the point. By unlocking the web from the hands of a few players this will inevitably enable a surge in innovation and let services flourish which prioritise the user’s interests.

    Apple, Google, Microsoft, and others have their own interests at heart (as they should), but that means that the user can often be viewed purely as a source of revenue, quite literally at the users’ expense.

    As the Decentralised Web attracts the interest and passion of the mainstream developer community, there is no telling what new economies will emerge and what kinds of new technologies and services they will invent. The one certainty is they will intrinsically support their communities and user bases just as much as the interests of their creators.

  2. shinichi says:

    非集中型ウェブが皆の手に力を取り戻す

    by Matthew Hodgson

    translated by Sako

    http://jp.techcrunch.com/2016/10/10/20161009a-decentralized-web-would-give-power-back-to-the-people-online/

    最近、Googleが新しいビデオ通話ツールをリリースした(その通り、また別のツールである)。Googleのハングアウトは企業向けとしては主役の座を下ろされて、Google Duoが次のビデオ通話の大物と考えられている。

    ということで、私たちはMicrosoftのSkype、AppleのFaceTime、そしてGoogleのDuoを手にしているというわけだ。各大企業は、それぞれが独自の類似サービスを持ち、それ自身のバブルの中で立ち往生をしている。これらのサービスは素晴らしいものかもしれないが、インターネットが構築されつつあった夢のような年月の間に、私たちが想像していたものと全く同じものだとは言えない。

    ウェブやインターネットの本来の目的は、もし思い出してもらえるならば、人類を良くするために、誰でも公平に参加することのできる共通で中立なネットワークを構築することだった。幸いなことに、このビジョンへとウェブを連れ戻そうとする新しい動きがあり、それはウェブ誕生の当初から続く重要な姿さえ含んだものである。それは非集中型ウェブ(Decentralised Web)またはウェブ3.0と呼ばれ、如何なる単一「中央」組織にも依存することのないサービスを、インターネット上に構築しようとする新しい動きとして説明される。

    では、ウェブの初期の夢の期間に何が起きていたのか?この中立な基礎構造の上で価値を生み出すための簡単な方法は、情報を集め、抱え込み、そしてお金にする集中型サービスを構築することだと人びとが気が付いたために、大部分の利他的行為が最初のドットコムバブルの間に色褪せていった。

    検索エンジン(例えばグーグル)、ソーシャルネットワーク(例えばFacebook)、チャットアプリ(例えばのWhatsApp)は、インターネット上で集中サービスを提供することによって巨大な成長を遂げた。例えば、Facebookによるインターネットの未来ビジョンは、同社が支援する集中サービスのサブセットを提供するものに過ぎない(FacebookのFree Basicsとinternet.org)。

    一方、それはコンテンツへURLを介してリンクできるといった基本的なインターネットの自由を(コンテンツをFacebookの中だけで共有するを強制することで)阻害し、検索エンジンがそのコンテンツにインデックスを(Facebook内の検索機能以外が)張ることを許さない。

    非集中型ウェブが描く未来は、コミュニケーション、通貨、出版、ソーシャルネットワーキング、検索、アーカイブなどのサービスがただ1つの組織に所有された集中型サービスとして提供されるのではなく、人びとの力(彼ら自身のコミュニティとユーザーたち)を使う技術によって提供される世界だ。

    非集中型の核となるアイデアは、あるサービスの運営が、盲目的に単一の全能企業に委ねられていないということだ。その代り、サービスへの責任は共有されている:おそらく複数の連携するサーバー上で実行されたり、あるいはおそらく完全に「分散」したクライアント側のアプリ上でピアツーピアモデルとして実行されたりという形で。

    コミュニティというものは「ビザンチン」であるかもしれず、お互いを信用したり依存したりする理由はないとしても、非集中型サービスの振る舞いを記述するルールは参加者が公平に行動することを強制するように設計される。こうした設計は、参加者が相互に責任保持することを実現するマークル木とデジタル署名のような暗号テクノロジーに強く依存している。

    非集中型ウェブが必ず守らなければならない3つの基本領域が存在する:プライバシー、データ互換性、そしてセキュリティだ。

    プライバシー:非集中型は、データのプライバシーへの、よりしっかりとした注目を強制する。データはネットワーク全体に分散されるので、許可されたユーザーだけが読み書きできることを保証するエンドツーエンドの暗号化技術がとても重要である。データ自身へのアクセスはネットワーク側で完全にアルゴリズム的に制御される。これは、ネットワークの所有者が、顧客のプロファイルを活用し広告のターゲットとするために、データへのフルアクセスを持つ、典型的な集中型ネットワークのやり方とは反対のやり方である。

    データ互換性:非集中型環境では、ユーザーが自身のデータを所有し、誰とそのデータを共有するかを選択する。さらに、ユーザーはあるサービスプロバイダーを離れる時にも、そのデータに対する制御権を握っている(サービスと言うものが、サービスプロバイダーという概念を保っていると仮定している)。これは重要なことだ。もし私が、今日ゼネラルモーターズからBMWに乗り換えるとするなら、自分の運転記録を一緒に持っていくことができない理由があるだろうか?同じことが、チャットプラットフォームの履歴や健康記録にも適用される。

    セキュリティ:そして最後に。私たちはセキュリティ上の脅威が増大する世界に住んでいる。集中型の環境では、サイズが大きくなるほど、悪者を惹きつけるハニーポットも大きくなっていく。非集中型の環境は、最初から公的な監視の下で構築されて来ているため、ハッキング、潜入、買収、破産、その他の脅威に対して、一般的な性質としてより安全だ。
    丁度インターネット自身が、多くの異なる未接続のローカルエリアネットワークを、お互いに接続された新しい共通基盤へと持ち上げるきっかけとなったように、今私たちは更に高レベルのサービスを支える、中立な共通基盤をもたらすテクノロジーの登場と共に、全く同じパターンが再び起きつつあることを目撃している。そして、ウェブ 2.0の時と同様に、ウェブ3.0到来を告げる最初の波は、既に何年も私たちの間を歩き回っているのだ。

    Gitは完全非集中型のバージョン管理システムとして広く成功していて、ほぼ完全にSubversionのような集中型システムを置き換えている。有名なビットコインは、1つの通貨が中央当局なしに存在できることを示した、これはPaypalのような集中型管理システムとは対照的である。Diasporaは、Facebookを代替する非集中型システムの提供を目指している。Freenetは、非集中型ウェブサイト、電子メール、そしてファイル共有のための道を開いた。

    それらよりは有名ではないが、StatusNet(現在はGNU Socialと呼ばれている)は、Twitterの非集中型代替システムを提供している。XMPPは、AOLインスタントメッセンジャー、ICQ、MSN、およびその他のメッセージングシステムの非集中型の代替システムを提供するために作られた。

    しかしながら、これらのテクノロジー(これらを夢見て、そのマスマーケットでの不調を喜んで受け入れるようなオタクたちのお気に入り)は、いつでも崖っぷちに座らされてきた。いらいらするほど主流から外れたものだったのだ。しかし潮目は変わってきている。大規模なサイロ(牧場で干し草を詰め込んで貯蔵するための倉庫、転じて何でも囲い込むように押し込めた場所)のようなコミュニティプラットフォームへの依存は、ユーザーにとって最善の利益ではないという認識と共に、世の中の時代精神がついに追いつきつつある。

    重要なことだが、主流産業からの注目を集め、現実世界の新時代を告げる、新しい世代の非集中型スタートアップが出現している。

    BlockstackとEthereumは、ブロックチェーンが単なる暗号通貨以上のものとして、どのように使えるのかを示している。ここでは、強い合意を必要とする非集中型システムを構築するために用いられる、ビルディングブロックの汎用セットとしてブロックチェーンは振る舞っている。

    IPFSとDatプロジェクトは、所有権およびデータへの責任が、1箇所でホストされるのではなく、アクセスする者全員で共有される、完全に非集中型のデータの基礎構造を提供する。

    実際の歩みに対する現在の変化の勢いは、 Internet Archiveが6月に主催したDecentralised Web Summit(非集中型ウェブサミット)によってもたらされた。このイベントは、多くの元祖「インターネットとワールド・ワイド・ウェブの父親たち」 を集め、「ウェブを開かれた場所にし続ける」方法と、「より信頼でき、プライベートで、そして楽しい」ウェブの再発明に関しての議論が行われた。

    Internet Archiveの創設者であるブリュースター・ケールは、どのように集中型のInternet Archiveを非集中型のものに移行するかを考えているときに、非集中化技術の進展を直に知った:壊れやすく脆弱な単一サービスではなく、それを利用するコミュニティによる運用とホスティングということだ。

    さらに、サミットにおける、ティム・バーナーズ=リー、ヴィントン・サーフ、そしてブリュースターその他多くのインターネットの古参たちの熱烈な支持は、非集中型へのシフトが、初めて注意を集めその確立へ向けた真の承認を得たことを示した。

    ティム・バーナーズ=リーはこう語った :

    ウェブは、自分自身のドメインと自分自身のウェブサーバーを持つことで、誰でも参加することができるように設計されました。そしてそれは上手く行っていません。その代わりに、私たちは各々の個人データがこうしたサイロの中に閉じ込められているような状況に置かれています。[…]そこで、提案したいのは、非集中型ウェブのアイデアを取り戻すことなのです。

    人びとに力を取り戻すために。私たちはただ微調整をしていけば社会革命を起こすことができると考えています:私たちはウェブの技術は使いますが、あなたが使うデータからあなたが使うアプリを分離するような方法で行うのです。

    現在の課題は、これらの新しい技術を成熟させて、マスマーケットに完全に持ち込むことだ。商業的には非集中型には巨大な価値がある:現在のようなサイロは洗い流される一方で、新しいものが常に新しい共通基盤の上に現れてくることになる。丁度最初のウェブのときに起きたようなことが。

    Githubはこの代表選手である:この20億ドルの会社は、Gitの非集中型テクノロジーの上に、完全に付加価値サービスとして構築されている ‐ ユーザーが自分のデータを取り出し、任意の時点で残すことを当たり前のようにできるにも関わらず。

    同様に、新しい機会がこの勇敢な新しい世界に登場するにつれて、私たちは非集中型インフラストラクチャと、その上の商業的に有効なサービスを提供する会社群の新しい波を見ることができることを期待している。

    最終的に、ウェブ 3.0が私たちを向かわせる最終的な方向のを予測するのは難しい、そしてそれこそが肝心な点なのだ。ウェブを少数のプレイヤーの手から解放することによって、必然的にイノベーションが加速し、ユーザーの利便性を優先したサービスが繁栄するようになる。

    Apple、Google、Microsoft、その他の企業は、その中心にそれぞれの収益を置いている(もちろんそれが必要だからだが)、それが意味するところはユーザーはしばしば純粋に収益源としてみなされるということである。文字通りユーザーを糧にして。

    非集中型ウェブが主流の開発者コミュニティの関心と情熱を集めて行くにつれて、どんな新しい経済が出現し、どんな種類の新しいテクノロジーとサービスを彼らが発明するのかは予想できない。ただ1つ確かなことは、その創造者たちの関心と同じように、コミュニティは本質的に自身のコミュニティとユーザーベースを支援していくということだ。

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.