Erika Engelhaupt

The scientists looked for evidence of this ghastly activity among four million recorded deaths in more than a thousand different mammals, from shrews to primates. On top of that, they compiled a history of human slayings.
One pattern stood out pretty clearly: Lethal violence increased over the course of mammal evolution. While only about 0.3 percent of all mammals die in conflict with members of their own species, that rate is sixfold higher, or about 2 percent, for primates. Early humans likewise should have about a 2 percent rate—and that lines up with evidence of violence in Paleolithic human remains.
The medieval period was a particular killer, with human-on-human violence responsible for 12 percent of recorded deaths. But for the last century, we’ve been relatively peaceable, killing one another off at a rate of just 1.33 percent worldwide. And in the least violent parts of the world today, we enjoy homicide rates as low as 0.01 percent.

This entry was posted in nature. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Erika Engelhaupt

  1. shinichi says:

    How Human Violence Stacks Up Against Other Killer Animals

    Humans get some of their knack for killing each other from the primate family tree, a new study says—but that doesn’t let us off the hook.

    by Erika Engelhaupt

    https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/09/human-violence-evolution-animals-nature-science/

    HUMANS INHERITED A propensity for violence from our primate ancestors, a new study says, making it easy to think, “Ah, see—we really are just animals.” But that doesn’t give animals enough credit.

    The first humans were about as violent as could be expected based on their family tree, researchers report September 28 in the journal Nature. The scientists pored through examples of lethal violence—not animals killing other species, such as predators and prey, but killings within a species, whether by cannibalism, infanticide, or aggression.

    They looked for evidence of this ghastly activity among four million recorded deaths in more than a thousand different mammals, from shrews to primates. On top of that, they compiled a history of human slayings.

    One pattern stood out pretty clearly: Lethal violence increased over the course of mammal evolution. While only about 0.3 percent of all mammals die in conflict with members of their own species, that rate is sixfold higher, or about 2 percent, for primates. Early humans likewise should have about a 2 percent rate—and that lines up with evidence of violence in Paleolithic human remains.

    The medieval period was a particular killer, with human-on-human violence responsible for 12 percent of recorded deaths. But for the last century, we’ve been relatively peaceable, killing one another off at a rate of just 1.33 percent worldwide. And in the least violent parts of the world today, we enjoy homicide rates as low as 0.01 percent.

    “Evolutionary history is not a total straitjacket on the human condition; humans have changed and will continue to change in surprising ways,” says study author José María Gómez of Spain’s Arid Zones Experimental Station. “No matter how violent or pacific we were in the origin, we can modulate the level of interpersonal violence by changing our social environment. We can build a more pacific society if we wish.”

    Lethal Lemurs

    What may be most surprising to some of us, though, isn’t how violent we are, but rather how we compare to our mammalian cousins.

    It’s not easy to estimate how often animals kill each other in the wild, but Gómez and his team got a good overview of the species most and least likely to kill their own kind. The number of hyenas killed by other hyenas is around 8 percent. The yellow mongoose? Ten percent. And lemurs—cute, bug-eyed lemurs? As many as 17 percent of deaths in some lemur species result from lethal violence. (See “Prairie Dogs Are Serial Killers That Murder Their Competition.”)

    Yet consider this: The study shows that 60 percent of mammal species are not known to kill one another at all, as far as anyone has seen. Very few bats (of more than 1,200 species) kill each other. And apparently pangolins and porcupines get along fine without offing members of their own species.

    Whales are also generally thought not to kill their own kind. But dolphin biologist Richard Connor of the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth notes that a dolphin infanticide attempt was documented recently, and he cautions that whales, as their close relations, might also be more violent than we’ve thought.

    “We could witness a lethal fight in dolphins but not know it, because the victim swims away apparently unimpaired, but is bleeding to death internally,” he says.

    More often, though, people think animals are more violent than they really are, says animal behavior expert Marc Bekoff, an emeritus professor at the University of Colorado Boulder.

    “Violence might be deep in the human lineage, but I think people should be very cautious in saying that when humans are violent, they’re behaving like nonhuman animals,” Bekoff says.

    Bekoff has long contended that nonhumans are predominantly peaceful, and he points out that just as some roots of violence can be found in our animal past, so can roots of altruism and cooperation. He cites the work of the late anthropologist Robert Sussman, who found that even primates, some of the most aggressive mammals, spend less than one percent of their day fighting or otherwise competing.

    After all, challenging another animal to a duel is risky, and for many animals the benefits don’t outweigh the risk of death. Highly social and territorial animals are the most likely to kill one another, the new study found. Many primates fit that killer profile, though as experts point out, not all of them. Bonobos have mostly peaceable, female-dominated social structures, while chimps are much more violent.

    These differences among primates matter, says Richard Wrangham, a biological anthropologist at Harvard known for his study of the evolution of human warfare. In chimpanzees and other primates that kill each other, infanticide is the most common form of killing. But humans are different—they frequently kill each other as adults.

    “That ‘adult-killing club’ is very small,” he says. “It includes a few social and territorial carnivores such as wolves, lions, and spotted hyenas.”

    While humans may be expected to have some level of lethal violence based on their family tree, it would be wrong to conclude that there’s nothing surprising about human violence, Wrangham says.

    When it comes to murderous tendencies, he says, “humans really are exceptional.”

  2. shinichi says:

    人類は暴力とともに進化、ただし現代は例外的

    哺乳類約1000種400万件の記録と殺人の歴史から判明、ネイチャー誌

    https://natgeo.nikkeibp.co.jp/atcl/news/16/093000371/

     人間の暴力性は、霊長類の祖先からずっと受け継がれてきたものだという研究成果が9月28日付けの科学誌「ネイチャー」に発表された。それを見て「ほら、本当は私たちもただの動物じゃないか」と考えることはたやすいが、そんなに簡単に言ってしまっては動物への理解が足りないようだ。

     この研究で科学者たちは、相手を死に至らしめる暴力的な行動事例について調査した。捕食者と被捕食者など、別種の動物を殺す行為ではなく、共食いや子供の殺害、争いなど、同じ種の中で起きたものが対象だ。(参考記事:「【動画】衝撃、子グマを食べるホッキョクグマ」

     科学者たちは、トガリネズミから霊長類まで、1000種以上の哺乳類の約400万件の死の記録から、このような恐ろしい行動の証拠を探し、人間の殺人の歴史もまとめてみた。(参考記事:「5000年前の惨劇 アイスマンの最期」

     すると、1つのパターンがはっきりと浮かび上がった。相手を死に至らしめる暴力は、哺乳類が進化するにつれて増加していた。同種間での争いで死んだ哺乳類は全体の0.3%しかいなかったにもかかわらず、霊長類ではこの数字が6倍の約2%となる。同様に初期人類も約2%で、これは旧石器時代の人骨に残されている暴力の痕跡の割合とも一致する。(参考記事:「人類の暴力の先例? 頭蓋骨に殴打跡」

     中世は殺人の時代だ。記録されている死のうち12%が人間同士の争いによるものだった。それに比べると前世紀はかなり平和で、互いに殺し合った率は世界全体で1.33%だった。現在、世界でもっとも暴力が少ない場所では、殺人率はわずか0.01%と非常に低い数値を人々は享受している。

    「進化史は人間の状態を完全に拘束するものではありません。人間は変化しており、これからも驚くべき方法で変化し続けるでしょう」。論文の著者であり、スペインの乾燥地帯実験所に所属するホセ・マリア・ゴメス氏はそう話す。「祖先が暴力的だったにしろ、平和的であったにしろ、私たち人間は社会環境を変えることによって、個人間の暴力のレベルに影響を与えられます。つまり、私たちが願うなら、もっと平和な社会を作れるということです」

    殺し合わない哺乳類が多数派

     この研究結果で驚くべきは、人類がどれほど暴力的なのかということよりも、人類と哺乳類の親戚たちを比較した点だ。

     野生環境で動物同士の殺し合いが起きる頻度を見積もるのは容易ではないが、ゴメス氏のチームは、同種の動物を殺す可能性が高い動物と低い動物についてのよいまとめを記している。ハイエナが他のハイエナに殺される確率は約8%だった。キイロマングースは10%。そして、丸い目がかわいらしいキツネザルは、種によってはなんと17%が同種からの暴力によって死んでいた。(参考記事:「カバを食べるカバ ――共食いする動物たち」

     しかし、哺乳類の60%で同種間の殺し合いがみられなかったことも考慮すべきだろう。1200種以上いると言われるコウモリの中で、殺し合いをするのはほんの一部だけだ。センザンコウやヤマアラシも、種の中で殺し合いをせずに生活している。(参考記事:「1.3億円相当、センザンコウのウロコ4トン押収」

     一般的にクジラやイルカも殺し合いをしないと考えられている。しかし、イルカを専門とする米マサチューセッツ大学ダートマス校の生物学者リチャード・コナー氏によると、最近イルカが子殺しを行おうとする様子が記録されたという。コナー氏は、イルカに近いクジラも、考えられているよりも暴力的であるかもしれないという。

    「そうとは気づかずに、私たちはイルカ同士の殺し合いを目撃しているかもしれません。攻撃された側は一見無傷でそのまま泳ぎ去ってしまうのですが、内出血によってやがて死んでしまうのです」

    霊長類における違いこそが重要

     それでも、動物の行動に詳しい米コロラド大学ボルダー校名誉教授のマーク・ベコフ氏によると、動物は実際よりも暴力的であると見なされがちだという。

    「暴力は人類の系統に深く刻まれたものかもしれません。暴力的な人間を形容する際に、動物のようだと表現するのには十分に慎重になるべきだと私は思います」

     ベコフ氏は、人間以外の動物の大部分は圧倒的に平和的だと長いこと主張してきた。そして、人間の動物としての進化史に、暴力のルーツがあるのと同じように、利他や協調のルーツもあると指摘する。ベコフ氏は、人類学者の故ロバート・サスマン氏の文献を引用し、もっとも暴力的な哺乳類である霊長類でさえ、戦いや競争に費やす時間は1日の1%に満たないと述べている。

     いずれにせよ、別の動物に決闘を挑むのは危険であり、ほとんどの動物にとって、そのメリットは死のリスクを上回らない。この新しい研究では、社交性や縄張り意識が強い動物ほど殺し合う確率が高いことも明らかになった。この条件には多くの霊長類が該当するものの、すべてではない。ボノボはメスが支配する平和な社会構造を持つのに対し、チンパンジーはそれよりもはるかに暴力的だ。(参考記事:「ボノボの森へ 意外な素顔」「チンパンジー、殺し合いで縄張りを拡大」

    「霊長類におけるこの違いこそ問題です」と、人間の戦いの進化を研究したことで知られている米ハーバード大学の生物人類学者リチャード・ランガム氏は話す。チンパンジーなどの殺し合いをする霊長類で、もっとも頻繁に見られる同種間の殺人行為は子殺しである。しかし、人間は異なり、大人になってから殺し合うケースがほとんどだ。(参考記事:「ボノボの性質が人間の進化の謎を解明?」

    「このような『大人の殺人クラブ』がある動物はごく少数です。オオカミ、ライオン、ブチハイエナなど、社交性と縄張り意識がある肉食動物の一部にしか見られません」(参考記事:「ライオン 生と死の平原」

     人類の系統にはある程度の暴力性が流れこんでいるのかもしれない。だとしても、人間が暴力行為に及ぶのは当然と結論づけるのは誤りだろうというのがランガム氏の意見だ。殺人的な傾向について、彼は言う。「人間は本当に例外なのです」

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.