Sui-Lee Wee, Steven Lee Myers

While many countries are struggling with low fertility rates and aging populations, these issues are even more pressing in China, because the country’s underdeveloped social safety net means that most older adults rely heavily on their families to pay for health care, retirement and other expenses. Many young married couples are expected to shoulder the burden of taking care of their parents, in-laws and grandparents, without the support of siblings.
The birthrate in China fell to 10.48 per thousand last year, the lowest since the founding of the People’s Republic in 1949, a decline that has important implications for the country’s economy and labor pool. If birthrates continue to fall while life expectancy increases, there will not be enough young people to support the economy and the elderly, the fastest-growing segment of the population.
That will put pressure on the country’s underfunded pension systems, its overcrowded hospitals, and companies.

This entry was posted in asian way. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Sui-Lee Wee, Steven Lee Myers

  1. shinichi says:

    China’s Birthrate Hits Historic Low, in Looming Crisis for Beijing

    In a country where most older adults rely heavily on their families, the continuing drop in births could have a seismic effect in the decades to come.

    by Sui-Lee Wee and Steven Lee Myers

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/16/business/china-birth-rate-2019.html

    The number of babies born in China last year fell to a nearly six-decade low, exacerbating a looming demographic crisis that is set to reshape the world’s most populous nation and threaten its economic vitality.

    About 14.6 million babies were born in China in 2019, according to the National Bureau of Statistics. That was a nearly 4 percent fall from the previous year, and the lowest official number of births in China since 1961, the last year of a widespread famine in which millions of people starved to death. That year, only 11.8 million babies were born.

    Births in China have now fallen for three years in a row. They had risen slightly in 2016, a year after the government ended its one-child policy and allowed couples to have two children, a shift that officials hoped would drive a sustained increase in the number of newborns. But that has not materialized.

    Experts say the slowdown is rooted in several trends, including the rise of women in the work force who are educated and don’t see marriage as necessary to achieving financial security, at least for themselves. For Chinese couples, many cannot afford to have children as living costs increase and their jobs demand more time and energy. And attitudes have shifted.

    “It’s a society where nobody wants to get married and people can’t afford to have children,” said Wang Feng, a professor of sociology at the University of California, Irvine. “On a deeper level, you would have to think about what kind of society China will become, not just demographically, but socially.”

    Eno Zhang, a 37-year-old engineer in a tech company in Beijing, said he had argued with his parents for 10 years about his decision not to have children. They have since given up, he said.

    “I value my spiritual life and hobbies,” Mr. Zhang said. “Children will consume too much of my energy. This is something I cannot accept.”

    While many countries are struggling with low fertility rates and aging populations, these issues are even more pressing in China, because the country’s underdeveloped social safety net means that most older adults rely heavily on their families to pay for health care, retirement and other expenses. Many young married couples are expected to shoulder the burden of taking care of their parents, in-laws and grandparents, without the support of siblings.

    The birthrate in China fell to 10.48 per thousand last year, the lowest since the founding of the People’s Republic in 1949, a decline that has important implications for the country’s economy and labor pool. If birthrates continue to fall while life expectancy increases, there will not be enough young people to support the economy and the elderly, the fastest-growing segment of the population.

    That will put pressure on the country’s underfunded pension systems, its overcrowded hospitals, and companies.

    Making matters worse, the slowing birthrate has meant that China’s main state pension fund, which relies on tax revenues from its work force, risks running out of money by 2035 because of a decline in the number of workers, according to research commissioned by the government-backed Chinese Academy of Social Sciences.

    Despite the looming demographic crisis, the government still maintains tight control over reproduction.

    The ruling Communist Party had sought for three decades to slow population growth by limiting most couples to one child and forcing many women to undergo abortions and sterilizations. In 2015, alarmed by the slump in births, it increased that limit to two children.

    Even as the government is now trying to encourage people to have babies, it is sending mixed signals. It still punishes couples who exceed the birth restrictions. The authorities fine single women who bear children, and bar them from using reproductive technologies like freezing their eggs.

    The government’s effort to raise the birthrate is also running into broader economic and social changes.

    Education, housing and health care costs are rising. More women are getting university degrees and are reluctant to interrupt their careers. Some among the current generation of women of childbearing age, themselves the product of the “one child” policy, don’t see what the fuss about offspring is all about.

    Dong Chang, a 28-year-old administrative employee at a dentist’s clinic in Beijing, said millennials like her enjoyed spending on themselves without batting an eyelid and would find it hard to sacrifice their wants for a child.

    “We are all only children, and to be honest, a little selfish,” she said. “How can I raise a child when I’m still a child myself? And take care of him and feed him at midnight?”

    Ms. Dong said that she was living with her boyfriend but that they had decided to not get married for the time being because they didn’t want their parents to hound them about having children.

    Melody Lin, a 26-year-old worker at a nonprofit, said she couldn’t think of a reason to have a child. She said she had thought about conforming to societal norms and starting a family but decided against it after reading arguments that not all women need to have children.

    “My parents think that I’m still young and will change my mind when I get older, but I think it’s unlikely,” she said.

    China’s total fertility rate — an estimate of the number of babies a woman would have over her lifetime — has fallen to 1.6 children per woman, and for years has generally remained below the “replacement” level of 2.1. That means China could soon see a shrinking population and a work force too small to support its pensioners.

    The Chinese Academy of Social Sciences said last year that China’s population contraction would begin in 2027. Others believe it will come sooner or has already begun. The accuracy and completeness of China’s population figures, like other sensitive statistics, have been questioned for years, making exact projections and comparisons difficult.

    Cai Yong, an associate professor of sociology at the University of North Carolina, said he expected the low fertility rate to continue for at least a decade.

    “There are a lot of parallels with this demographic crisis to global warming,” Dr. Cai said. “The waters are rising slowly, and we need a longer term strategy to deal with it.”

  2. shinichi says:

    少子化が進む中国 抱え込んだ数々の将来リスク

    ニューヨークタイムズ 世界の話題

    by Sui―Lee Wee, Steven Lee Myers

    https://globe.asahi.com/article/13140578

    中国で昨年生まれた子どもの数は60年近く前の水準にまで落ち込んだ。顕在化してきた人口統計学的危機の悪化は、この世界最多人口国の再構築を迫り、経済的な活力を脅かしている。

    国家統計局によると、中国の2019年の出生数は約1460万人。前年比で4%近く減少し、飢えが広がって何百万人もが餓死した最終年の1961年以降、中国の公式数字では最低の出生数だった。61年には1180万人しか生まれなかった。

    中国の出産数は3年連続で減っている。政府が一人っ子政策に終止符を打ち、子どもを2人まで産めるようカップルに許可した翌年の2016年、出生数はわずかに増えた。新生児の数の持続的な増加を促すことを当局が期待した政策転換だった。ところが、それは実を結ばなかった。

    専門家たちが言うには、出生数の減少にはいくつかの背景がある。教育を受け、結婚が、少なくとも自分たちには経済的な安定の達成に必要なことではないとみなす女性が労働力として台頭したことなどだ。中国人カップルの多くは、生活費が高騰し、仕事に時間とエネルギーが求められて子どもを持つ余裕がない。また、考え方も変わった。

    「誰も結婚を望まず、子どもを産む余裕もない社会なのだ」と米カリフォルニア大学アーバイン校の社会学教授ワン・ファンは言う。「より深いレベルで、人口統計学だけでなく社会的にも、中国がどのような社会になるのかについて考える必要がある」

    北京のハイテク会社のエンジニア、エノ・チャン(37)は子どもを持たないという彼の決意について、ここ10年、両親と口論してきたと言う。彼によると、その後、両親はあきらめた。

    「私は精神生活や趣味を大事にしている」とチャン。「子どもには、あまりにも多くのエネルギーを注ぎ込むことになる。それは、私には受け入れがたい」

    多くの国々が低い出生率と人口の高齢化に苦闘しているが、その問題は中国でより差し迫っている。というのは、中国の場合、社会的なセーフティーネットが未発達なため、ほとんどの高齢者は医療や退職後の生活その他の費用を家族に大きく依存しているからだ。多くの若い夫婦は、兄弟姉妹の支援なしに両親や義理の親、祖父母のめんどうをみることが期待されている。

    中国の出生率は昨年、1千人当たり10.48人にまで低下した。49年の中華人民共和国の建国以来最低で、この落ち込みは経済や労働力の供給源に重大な影響がある。一方で平均寿命が延びているなか、出生率が下がり続ければ、経済と急速に膨らむ高齢人口を支えるには若者の数が十分ではなくなる。

    それは、資金不足の年金制度や過密な病院、企業にプレッシャーをかけることになる。

    さらに悪いことに、出生率が低下すると、労働者からの税収に依拠する中国の主な国家年金基金は労働人口減で2035年までに資金が底をつくリスクを抱え込むことになる。これは、政府を後ろ盾とする中国社会科学院の委託調査によるものだ。

    人口統計学上の危機が顕在化しているにもかかわらず、中国政府は依然として生殖における厳しい管理体制を堅持している。

    政権党の中国共産党は30年間にわたり、大半のカップルに対し子どもは1人の制限を課し、多くの女性に妊娠中絶や不妊手術を強いることで人口の成長を抑え込もうとしてきた。2015年、出生率の低迷に不安を抱いた政府は子どもの数の制限を2人にまで増やした。

    政府は現在、子どもを産むよう奨励しようとしているのだが、あいまいな印象を与えている。出産制限を超えたカップルには罰則を適用する。当局は、子どもを産む独身女性には罰金を科し、卵子の凍結といった生殖技術を使うことを禁じている。

    出生率を上げるための政府の取り組みは、より広範な経済的かつ社会的な変化にも直面している。

    教育費や住宅費、医療費が高騰している。女性たちはますます大学教育を受けるようになり、キャリアの中断を嫌うようになった。妊娠可能年齢期にある女性の一部は、自身が「一人っ子」政策の産物で、子孫のことで大騒ぎする意味が理解できないのだ。

    北京の歯科医院で管理事務職にあるトン・チャン(28)は、彼女のようなミレニアル世代はビクつくことなく自分のためにおカネを使って楽しく過ごしており、子どものために自身の欲求を犠牲にするなんて想像し難いと言っている。

    「私たち、みんな一人っ子で、正直なところ、ちょっと利己的」と彼女は言う。「自分自身がまだ子どもなのに、子どもなんて育てられる?

    それに、その子の世話をして、真夜中に授乳するなんて?」

    トンは、ボーイフレンドと一緒に暮らしているが、2人は当面結婚しないと決めていると言う。それぞれの両親から、子どもをつくれとせっつかれたくないからだ。

    非営利団体の従業員メロディー・リン(26)は、子どもを持つ理由が思いつかないと言う。社会の規範に合わせ、家族をつくることを考えたことがあるが、すべての女性が子どもを持つ必要はないとの主張を読んだ後は、そうしないことにしたと言うのだ。

    「私の両親は、私がまだ若いからで、年を重ねれば気が変わると思っているけれど、そうはならないと思う」と彼女は言っていた。

    中国の合計特殊出生率――1人の女性が生涯に産む子どもの推定数――は1.6人に低下し、長期にわたって「人口置換」水準の2.1を総じて下回ってきた。それは、中国は間もなく人口規模が縮小し、年金生活者を支えるには労働人口が少なすぎる事態になることを意味する。

    中国社会科学院は昨年、中国の人口減少は2027年に始まると語った。人口減少が始まるのはもっと早いか、すでに始まっているとみる向きもある。中国の人口に関する数字は、他のデリケートな統計と同様、その精度や完全性が長年疑問視されており、正確な予測や比較を難しくさせている。

    米ノースカロライナ大学の准教授(社会学)カイ・ヨンは、低い出生率は少なくとも今後10年は続くとみている。

    「人口統計学上の危機は、地球温暖化と多くの点で類似している」とカイは指摘する。「水面はゆっくりと上昇しており、それに対処するには長期的な戦略が必要だ」

  3. shinichi says:

    (sk)

    “It’s a society where nobody wants to get married and people can’t afford to have children (誰も結婚を望まず、子どもを産む余裕もない社会)” というのは日本も同じ。

    少子化問題はなにも中国に限ったことではない。いやむしろ日本のほうが問題の根は深いかもしれない。

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.