James Gallagher

The world is shutting down. Places that were once teeming with the hustle and bustle of daily life have become ghost-towns with massive restrictions put on our lives – from lockdowns and school closures to travel restrictions and bans on mass gatherings.
There are essentially three ways out of this mess.
 ・vaccination – at least 12-18 months away
 ・enough people develop immunity through infection – at least two years away
 ・or permanently change our behaviour/society – no clear endpoint

This entry was posted in life. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to James Gallagher

  1. shinichi says:

    Coronavirus: When will the outbreak end and life get back to normal?

    by James Gallagher

    https://www.bbc.com/news/health-51963486

    The world is shutting down. Places that were once teeming with the hustle and bustle of daily life have become ghost-towns with massive restrictions put on our lives – from lockdowns and school closures to travel restrictions and bans on mass gatherings.

    It is an unparalleled global response to a disease. But when will it end and when will we be able to get on with our lives?

    Prime Minister Boris Johnson has said he believes the UK can “turn the tide” against the outbreak within the next 12 weeks and the country can “send coronavirus packing”.

    But even if the number of cases starts to fall in the next three months, then we will still be far from the end.

    It can take a long time for the tide to go out – possibly years.

    It is clear the current strategy of shutting down large parts of society is not sustainable in the long-term. The social and economic damage would be catastrophic.

    What countries need is an “exit strategy” – a way of lifting the restrictions and getting back to normal.

    But the coronavirus is not going to disappear.

    If you lift the restrictions that are holding the virus back, then cases will inevitably soar.

    “We do have a big problem in what the exit strategy is and how we get out of this,” says Mark Woolhouse, a professor of infectious disease epidemiology at the University of Edinburgh.

    “It’s not just the UK, no country has an exit strategy.”

    It is a massive scientific and societal challenge.

    There are essentially three ways out of this mess.

     ・vaccination
     ・enough people develop immunity through infection
     ・or permanently change our behaviour/society

    Each of these routes would reduce the ability of the virus to spread.

    Vaccines – at least 12-18 months away

    A vaccine should give someone immunity so they do not become sick if they are exposed.

    Immunise enough people, about 60% of the population, and the virus cannot cause outbreaks – the concept known as herd immunity.

    The first person was given an experimental vaccine in the US this week after researchers were allowed to skip the usual rules of performing animal tests first.

    Vaccine research is taking place at unprecedented speed, but there is no guarantee it will be successful and will require immunisation on a global scale.

    The best guess is a vaccine could still be 12 to 18-months away if everything goes smoothly. That is a long time to wait when facing unprecedented social restrictions during peacetime.

    “Waiting for a vaccine should not be honoured with the name ‘strategy’, that is not a strategy,” Prof Woolhouse told the BBC.

    Natural immunity – at least two years away

    The UK’s short-term strategy is to drive down cases as much as possible to prevent hospitals being overwhelmed – when you run out of intensive care beds then deaths spike.

    Once cases are suppressed, it may allow some measures to be lifted for a while – until cases rise and another round of restrictions are needed.

    When this might be is uncertain. The UK’s chief scientific advisor, Sir Patrick Vallance, said “putting absolute timelines on things is not possible”.

    Doing this could, unintentionally, lead to herd immunity as more and more people were infected.

    But this could take years to build up, according to Prof Neil Ferguson from Imperial College London: “We’re talking about suppressing transmission at a level whereby, hopefully, only a very small fraction of the country will be infected.

    “So eventually, if we continued this for two-plus years, maybe a sufficient fraction of the country at that point might have been infected to give some degree of community protection.”

    But there is a question mark over whether this immunity will last. Other coronaviruses, which cause common cold symptoms, lead to a very weak immune response and people can catch the same bug multiple times in their lifetime.

    Alternatives – no clear endpoint

    “The third option is permanent changes in our behaviour that allow us to keep transmission rates low,” Prof Woolhouse said.

    This could include keeping some of the measures that have been put in place. Or introducing rigorous testing and isolation of patients to try to stay on top of any outbreaks.

    “We did early detection and contact tracing the first time round and it didn’t work,” Prof Woolhouse adds.

    Developing drugs that can successfully treat a Covid-19 infection could aid the other strategies too.

    They could be used as soon as people show symptoms in a process called “transmission control” to stop them passing it onto others.

    Or to treat patients in hospital to make the disease less deadly and reduce pressures on intensive care. This would allow countries to cope with more cases before needing to reintroduce lockdowns.

    Increasing the number of intensive care beds would have a similar effect by increasing the capacity to cope with larger outbreaks.

    I asked the UK’s chief medical adviser, Prof Chris Whitty, what his exit strategy was.

    He told me: “Long term, clearly a vaccine is one way out of this and we all hope that will happen as quickly as possible.”

    And that “globally, science will come up with solutions”.

  2. shinichi says:

    新型コロナウイルスの大流行はいつ終わる? 生活はもとに戻るのか?

    ジェイムズ・ギャラガー

    https://www.bbc.com/japanese/features-and-analysis-51974942

    世界がバタバタと閉じている。かつては日々の暮らしで大忙しだった場所が、ゴーストタウンと化している。生活にはとてつもない制限が加えられている。ロックダウン(封鎖)や一斉休校、渡航制限から大規模集会の禁止に至るまで。

    疫病に対する世界の反応としては、まったく並ぶものがない。しかし、いつになったら終わるのか。そして、いつになったらもとの生活に戻れるのか。

    イギリスのボリス・ジョンソン首相は、12週間のうちにイギリスはウイルスに対して「形勢を逆転できる」だろうし、イギリスはウイルスを「追い払う」ことができるはずだと述べた。

    しかし、たとえ今から3カ月の間に感染者が減り始めたとしても、まだまだ終わりからは程遠い。首相は潮目を変えると言ったが、潮が完全に引くまでにはかなりの時間がかかる。下手をすると何年もかかるかもしれない。

    社会の大部分を停止させるという現在の戦略を、長期的に継続するのは不可能だ。それははっきりしている。社会と経済の損失は、とてつもないものになる。

    各国は「出口戦略」を必要としている。様々な規制を解除して、平常に戻るための方策だ。

    けれども、新型コロナウイルスは消えてなくなりはしない。

    ウイルスを押さえ込んでいる規制を解除すれば、症例は否が応でも一気に増える。

    英エディンバラ大学のマーク・ウールハウス教授(感染症疫学)は、「出口戦略はどういうもので、どうやって今の事態から抜け出すのか、大問題を抱えている」と話す。

    「イギリスだけではない。どこの国にも、出口戦略がない」

    科学にとっても社会にとっても、これはとてつもない問題だ。

    この混乱から抜け出すための方法は、煎じ詰めれば次の3つだ。

     ・ワクチン
     ・相当数の人が感染して免疫をつける
     ・自分たちの行動や社会のあり方を恒久的に変える

    どの道を選んでも、ウイルスの拡散を防ぐ効果がある。

    ワクチン – 少なくとも1年~1年半は先

    ワクチンの摂取を受ければ免疫がつくので、ウイルスに接触しても発症しない。

    それなりの人数、たとえば人口の約6割が免疫をつければ、ウイルスの大流行は起きない。これがいわゆる「集団免疫」の概念だ。

    アメリカで今月半ば、初めて試験的にワクチン接種を受けた人がいる。通常ならば動物実験を繰り返して初めて人間相手の治験が許可されるものだが、今回はその手続きの省略が認められたのだ。

    かつてないペースでワクチン開発が進められているが、成功の保証はないし、実用可能になっても世界全体での摂取が必要になる。

    全てが順調に行っても、ワクチン開発にはまだ1年から1年半はかかるだろう。かなり先の話だ。平時において前例がないほどの制約を社会に強いている状態で、1年から1年半も待つのは大変だ。

    「ワクチンをただ漫然と待つことを、戦略という立派な名前で呼ぶべきではない。そんなものは戦略とは呼ばない」と、ウールハウス教授はBBCに話した。

    自然の免疫 – 少なくとも2年先

    イギリスの当面の短期的戦略は、医療機関がパンクしないように、感染者数をできる限り抑制するというものだ。集中治療病床が不足すれば、すなわち死者数が急増してしまうので。

    感染をいったん抑えることができれば、一部の規制策は一時的にでも解除できるかもしれない。その内にまた感染が増えて、規制再開が必要になるかもしれないが。

    これがいつになるのかは、不透明だ。英政府の首席科学顧問、サー・パトリック・ヴァランスは、「何がいつどうなると、はっきりした時系列を定めるのは無理だ」と述べている。

    しかし規制をしばし解除すれば、そういうつもりはなくても、感染者が次々と増えて集団免疫の獲得につながるかもしれない。

    しかし、免疫が十分に積み上がるには、何年もかかるかもしれない。インペリアル・コレッジ・ロンドンのニール・ファーガソン教授は、「できれば国民のごく一部が感染するだけで済むレベルに、伝播(でんぱ)をいかに抑えるかという話だ」と説明する。

    「なのでこの対応を2年余り続けたとして、もしかするとその時点ですでに、必要なだけの国民がすでに感染を経験していて、免疫を獲得していたとする。そうすれば、その人たちが、社会全体を守る防波堤になる」

    しかし、この集団免疫がいつまで続くのかは疑問だ。普通の風邪のような症状を引き起こす他のコロナウイルスは、感染してもあまりしっかりした免疫がつかない。だからこそ、同じウイルスに何度も感染して発症する人が出てくるのだ。

    代替案 – 明確な終息なし

    「3つ目の選択肢は、自分たちの行動形式を決定的に変えることだ。感染率を低く抑えるために」と、ウールハウス教授は言う。

    すでに実施された対策を今後もずっと続けるというのも、ひとつの方法かもしれない。あるいは、アウトブレイク(大流行)を制御するため、検査と隔離を徹底して行うことも、やり方としてはあり得る。

    「早期発見と接触者の追跡を試してみたが、うまくいかなかった」と教授は付け足す。

    新型コロナウイルスによる感染症「COVID-19」に効く治療薬の開発も、他の戦略を補完する。

    症状が出たとたんに患者に使えば、次の人への伝染を抑えられる。これは「感染制御」と呼ばれるプロセスだ。

    あるいは、入院患者の症状を薬で和らげ、集中治療室の負担を減らすという意味もある。これによって、ロックダウン(外出禁止)を再開してしまう前に、まずは急増した感染者を手当てできるようになる。

    集中治療病床を増やすことも、大規模なアウトブレイクへの対応能力を増やすという意味で、同じような効果がある。

    英政府の医療対策責任者、イングランド主任医務官のクリス・ウィッティー教授に、どういう出口戦略を用意しているのか質問してみた。

    「長期的には明らかに、ワクチンがひとつの脱出方法だ。できるだけ早くに開発されることを、みんな期待している」と、教授は答えた。

    「あとは地球全体として、科学が答えを見つけるよう、期待している」

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.