David Wallace-Wells

It is worse, much worse, than you think. The slowness of climate change is a fairy tale, perhaps as pernicious as the one that says it isn’t happening at all, and comes to us bundled with several others in an anthology of comforting delusions: that global warming is an Arctic saga, unfolding remotely; that it is strictly a matter of sea level and coastlines, not an enveloping crisis sparing no place and leaving no life undeformed; that it is a crisis of the “natural” world, not the human one; that those two are distinct, and that we live today somehow outside or beyond or at the very least defended against nature, not inescapably within and literally overwhelmed by it; that wealth can be a shield against the ravages of warming; that the burning of fossil fuels is the price of continued economic growth; that growth, and the technology it produces, will allow us to engineer our way out of environmental disaster; that there is any analogue to the scale or scope of this threat, in the long span of human history, that might give us confidence in staring it down.

This entry was posted in globe. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to David Wallace-Wells

  1. shinichi says:

    The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming

    by David Wallace-Wells

    I   Cascades

    It is worse, much worse, than you think. The slowness of climate change is a fairy tale, perhaps as pernicious as the one that says it isn’t happening at all, and comes to us bundled with several others in an anthology of comforting delusions: that global warming is an Arctic saga, unfolding remotely; that it is strictly a matter of sea level and coastlines, not an enveloping crisis sparing no place and leaving no life undeformed; that it is a crisis of the “natural” world, not the human one; that those two are distinct, and that we live today somehow outside or beyond or at the very least defended against nature, not inescapably within and literally overwhelmed by it; that wealth can be a shield against the ravages of warming; that the burning of fossil fuels is the price of continued economic growth; that growth, and the technology it produces, will allow us to engineer our way out of environmental disaster; that there is any analogue to the scale or scope of this threat, in the long span of human history, that might give us confidence in staring it down.

    None of this is true. But let’s begin with the speed of change. The earth has experienced five mass extinctions before the one we are living through now, each so complete a wiping of the fossil record that it functioned as an evolutionary reset, the planet’s phylogenetic tree first expanding, then collapsing, at intervals, like a lung: 86 percent of all species dead, 450 million years ago; 70 million years later, 75 percent; 125 million years later, 96 percent; 50 million years later, 80 percent; 135 million years after that, 75 percent again. Unless you are a teenager, you probably read in your high school textbooks that these extinctions were the result of asteroids. In fact, all but the one that killed the dinosaurs involved climate change produced by greenhouse gas. The most notorious was 250 million years ago; it began when carbon dioxide warmed the planet by five degrees Celsius, accelerated when that warming triggered the release of methane, another greenhouse gas, and ended with all but a sliver of life on Earth dead. We are currently adding carbon to the atmosphere at a considerably faster rate; by most estimates, at least ten times faster. The rate is one hundred times faster than at any point in human history before the beginning of industrialization. And there is already, right now, fully a third more carbon in the atmosphere than at any point in the last 800,000 years—perhaps in as long as 15 million years. There were no humans then. The oceans were more than a hundred feet higher.

    Many perceive global warming as a sort of moral and economic debt, accumulated since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution and now come due after several centuries. In fact, more than half of the carbon exhaled into the atmosphere by the burning of fossil fuels has been emitted in just the past three decades. Which means we have done as much damage to the fate of the planet and its ability to sustain human life and civilization since Al Gore published his first book on climate than in all the centuries—all the millennia—that came before. The United Nations established its climate change framework in 1992, building a political consensus out of a scientific consensus and advertising it unmistakably to the world; which means we have now done as much damage to the environment knowingly than we ever managed in ignorance. Global warming may seem like a distended morality tale playing out over several centuries and inflicting a kind of Old Testament retribution on the great-great-grandchildren of those responsible, since it was carbon burning in eighteenth-century England that lit the fuse of everything that has followed. But that is a fable about historical villainy that acquits those of us alive today—and unfairly. The majority of the burning has come since the premiere of Seinfeld. Since the end of World War II, the figure is about 85 percent. The story of the industrial world’s kamikaze mission is the story of a single lifetime—the planet brought from apparent stability to the brink of catastrophe in the years between a baptism or bar mitzvah and a funeral.

    We all know those lifetimes. When my father was born in 1938—among his first memories the news of Pearl Harbor and the mythic air force of the industrial propaganda films that followed— the climate system appeared, to most human observers, steady. Scientists had understood the greenhouse effect, had understood the way carbon produced by burned wood and coal and oil could hothouse the planet and disequilibrize everything on it, for three-quarters of a century. But they had not yet seen the effect, not really, not yet, which made it seem less like an observed fact than a dark prophecy, to be fulfilled only in a very distant future—perhaps never. By the time my father died, in 2016, weeks after the desperate signing of the Paris Agreement, the climate system was tipping toward devastation, passing the threshold of carbon concentration—400 parts per million in the earth’s atmosphere, in the eerily banal language of climatology—that had been, for years, the bright red line environmental scientists had drawn in the rampaging face of modern industry, saying, Do not cross. Of course, we kept going: just two years later, we hit a monthly average of 411, and guilt saturates the planet’s air as much as carbon, though we choose to believe we do not breathe it.

    The single lifetime is also the lifetime of my mother: born in 1945, to German Jews fleeing the smokestacks through which their relatives were incinerated, and now enjoying her seventy-third year in an American commodity paradise, a paradise supported by the factories of a developing world that has, in the space of a single lifetime, too, manufactured its way into the global middle class, with all the consumer enticements and fossil fuel privileges that come with that ascent: electricity, private cars, air travel, red meat. She has been smoking for fifty-eight of those years, always unfiltered, ordering the cigarettes now by the carton from China.

    It is also the lifetime of many of the scientists who first raised public alarm about climate change, some of whom, incredibly, remain working today—that is how rapidly we have arrived at this promontory. Roger Revelle, who first heralded the heating of the planet, died in 1991, but Wallace Smith Broecker, who helped popularize the term “global warming,” still drives to work at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory across the Hudson every day from the Upper West Side, sometimes picking up lunch at an old Jersey filling station recently outfitted as a hipster eatery; in the 1970s, he did his research with funding from Exxon, a company now the target of a raft of lawsuits that aim to adjudicate responsibility for the rolling emissions regime that today, barring a change of course on fossil fuels, threatens to make parts of the planet more or less unlivable for humans by the end of this century. That is the course we are speeding so blithely along—to more than four degrees Celsius of warming by the year 2100. According to some estimates, that would mean that whole regions of Africa and Australia and the United States, parts of South America north of Patagonia, and Asia south of Siberia would be rendered uninhabitable by direct heat, desertification, and flooding. Certainly it would make them inhospitable, and many more regions besides. This is our itinerary, our baseline. Which means that, if the planet was brought to the brink of climate catastrophe within the lifetime of a single generation, the responsibility to avoid it belongs with a single generation, too. We all also know that second lifetime. It is ours.

  2. shinichi says:

    地球に住めなくなる日: 「気候崩壊」の避けられない真実

    by デイビッド・ウォレス・ウェルズ

    translated by 藤井留美

    平均気温が4℃上昇した世界はどうなるのか
    現状の二酸化炭素排出ペースが続けば、今世紀末までに平均気温が4℃上昇するという予測が現実味を帯びてきます。
    4℃の上昇で、下記のことが起こります。

    ・地球規模の食料危機が毎年発生する。
    ・酷暑関連の死者が全体の9パーセント以上を占める。
    ・複数の気象災害が1か所で同時発生することが増え、損害は世界全体で600兆ドルに達する。
    ・紛争や戦争が倍増する。

    現状での「最良の予測」とされる2℃であっても、4億人が水不足に見舞われ、北半球でも夏の熱波で数千人の死者が出るとされています。
    しかももっと早くその世界が訪れるかもしれません。
    温暖化がもたらすものは海面の上昇だけではありません。
    殺人的な熱波、大規模な洪水・山火事、深刻な大気汚染、経済破綻、気候戦争など、さまざまな脅威が複雑に絡みあい、壊滅的な状況へと向かわせるのです。
    本書で描かれるのは、温暖化が進むとどうなるかの具体的な世界です。
    人々の生活や、社会、政治、経済の変化がリアルにあぶり出され、「最悪の未来」が訪れたらどうなるのか実感できるでしょう。
    戦慄の未来を回避するために残された時間はわずかです。
    著者は警鐘を鳴らすとともに、エネルギーおよび輸送システム、農業・工業などの面から、大転換を遂げるために何をすべきかを提言、より良い未来へと希望をつなげます。

    <目次>
    第1部 気候崩壊の連鎖が起きている
    第1章 いま何が起きているのか
    第2章 隠されてきた「最悪のシナリオ」
    第3章 気候崩壊はすでに進んでいる
    第4章 グローバルな気候崩壊の連鎖
    第5章 未来は変えられる
    第2部 気候変動によるさまざまな影響
    第6章 頻発する殺人熱波
    第7章 飢餓が世界を襲う
    第8章 水没する世界
    第9章 史上最悪の山火事
    第10章 自然災害が日常に
    第11章 水不足の脅威
    第12章 死にゆく海
    第13章 大気汚染による生命の危機
    第14章 グローバル化する感染症
    第15章 経済崩壊が世界を揺るがす
    第16章 気候戦争の勃発
    第17章 大規模な気候難民
    第3部 気候変動の見えない脅威
    第18章 世界の終わりの始まり
    第19章 資本主義の危機
    第20章 テクノロジーは解決策となるのか?
    第21章 政治の弱体化
    第22章 進歩が終わったあとの歴史
    第23章 終末思想への抵抗
    第4部 これからの地球を変えるために
    第24章 劇的な変化の時代が始まる

    著者あとがき 残された時間で何をするべきか

  3. shinichi says:

    気候大変動が地球と人類に与えうる「12の脅威」

    東洋経済オンライン

    https://headlines.yahoo.co.jp/article?a=20200322-00334619-toyo-soci&p=1

     温暖化していく地球は、いまの生活をずっと続けていきたい私たちをどんな形で脅かすのか?  どれほどの損失をあたえるのだろうか? 

    拙著『地球に住めなくなる日: 「気候崩壊」の避けられない真実』でも詳しく書いているが、ここにあげる12の脅威は、いまの時点で最大限、具体的に描ける未来図の一部だ。実際にはもっと悲惨かもしれないし、もちろん逆もありうる。

    ■殺人熱波、飢餓が世界を覆う? 

    1:頻発する殺人熱波
     国連の気候変動に関する政府間パネル(IPCC)は、現状と二酸化炭素の排出ペースが変わらない場合、今世紀末までの平均気温の上昇幅を4℃と予測する。インドから中東の人口数百万規模の大都市では、夏の外出が命がけになる。上昇が2℃程度でも同じことが起きると考えられる。

     現在、夏の平均最高気温が35℃に達する都市は世界に354カ所あるが、2050年には970に増え、8倍の16億人が生命にかかわる暑さにさらされる。仕事中に重い熱中症になる数も世界中で25万5000人になる予測だ。

     いまでも10億人がヒートストレスを受け、総人口の3分の1が毎年少なくとも20日間は熱波で死ぬ危険にさらされている。気温の上昇を2℃未満に抑えても、2100年には生命の危険は総人口の半分にまで増えるだろう。抑えられなければ、世界の人口の4分の3が熱波の影響を受ける。

    2:飢餓が世界を襲う
     いまの世界では8億人が栄養不良で、そのうち1億人は気候変動が原因とされる。主食となる穀類の栽培では、気温が1℃上昇すると収穫量は原則的に10パーセント減少する。現在でも、小麦栽培に適した地帯は、10年ごとに約260キロメートルずつ極地方向に移動している。

     気温が2℃上昇すると、地中海地域とインドの大半の農業は窮地に陥る。世界各地のトウモロコシ栽培が打撃を受け、食料供給が逼迫する。2.5℃上昇だと世界的な食料不足が起きて、必要なカロリーをまかなえなくなるだろう。

    3:水没する世界
     2100年には、世界の人口の5パーセントが毎年洪水に見舞われるだろう。インドネシアの首都ジャカルタは、洪水と地盤沈下で早くて2050年には完全に水没する。すでに中国の珠江(しゅこう)デルタ(スマートフォンの一大製造拠点である深圳は、まさにデルタに位置する)では、毎年夏になると洪水を避けて数十万人が避難している。

     わずか1.5℃の気温上昇でも、洪水被害はいまの160~240パーセント増になり、死者は1.5倍になることが見込まれている。

    4:史上最悪の山火事
     今後は山火事の件数が増え、延焼面積も広がる一方だ。現在アメリカでは、山火事で焼けた土地の面積は、1970年とくらべて2倍だが、2050年には山火事の被害面積は4倍になり、場所によっては5倍になるだろう。

     山火事はアメリカだけではなく、世界全体の問題だ。氷に覆われたグリーンランドでも、2017年に起きた山火事で燃えた面積は2014年の10倍だった。

     大規模な山火事の影響により、新しい生態サイクルが始まる。たとえばカリフォルニアの場合、乾燥が進み、山火事が増える一方で雨も多くなると科学者は警告する。1862年に起きたような大洪水が3倍に増えるというのだ。

    5:日常化する自然災害
     2017年夏の北半球は、かつてない極端な気候が続いた。2018年の夏も、前例のない強烈な熱波が世界的に各所で発生し、ロサンゼルスで42℃、パキスタンで50℃、アルジェリアで51℃を記録した。台風22号はフィリピンと香港に上陸、100人近い死者と10億ドルの被害を出した。

     2040年ごろには、2018年のような夏が当たり前になるだろう。ニューヨークでは「500年に一度」の洪水が、今後は25年に一度起きると推測される。極端な気候はますます加速し、昔は100年に一度ぐらいしか起こらなかった災害が、10~20年に一度の割合で発生するようになる。

    ■水資源の不足が起こる? 

    6:水不足の脅威
     水資源に関して、世界の人口の半分は高地の雪や氷が融けた水に頼っているが、温暖化によってそれも危うくなりつつある。

     パリ協定の目標を達成できたとしても、ヒマラヤ山脈の氷河は2100年までに40パーセント、あるいはそれ以上消失する。氷河が融けてしまうと、ペルーやカリフォルニアでも水不足が拡大するだろう。

     2020年には、2億5000万のアフリカ人が気候変動による水不足に直面する。2050年になるとアジアだけで10億人が水不足に陥り、さらに世界銀行の予測では、世界中の都市部で利用できる水がいまの3分の2まで落ちこむ。同年には、50億人が水資源を充分に活用できない状態に陥ると国連は予測する。

    7:死にゆく海
     海洋は二酸化炭素を吸収してきた結果、「海洋酸性化」という現象が起きている。海洋酸性化はサンゴだけでなく、魚の生息数にも打撃を与える。オーストラリア沿岸では、わずか10年間で魚の数が32パーセントも減少した。

     過去50年間で、海水が完全に無酸素化した「デッド・ゾーン」は世界で400カ所以上に増えた。面積にするとヨーロッパ大陸にほぼ相当する数百万平方キロメートルにもなる。酸素量が極端に少なく、悪臭を放つ海に悩まされる町も増えている。最大の原因は海水温の上昇だ。

    8:大気汚染による生命の危機
     世界の人口の95パーセントは、危険なレベルにまで汚染された空気のなかでくらしている。2013年以降、中国は大気浄化作戦に本格的に乗り出したが、2015年時点では大気汚染で毎年100万人以上の死者が出ている。世界全体では、死者6人のうち1人は大気汚染が原因で死亡している計算になる。

     現在、大気汚染で1日当たり1万人以上もが命を落としている。温暖化が進んでオゾン生成が増えれば、21世紀半ばにはオゾンスモッグの発生が70パーセント増える。そして2090年代には、世界で20億人が世界保健機関(WHO)の定める安全基準を満たさない空気を呼吸することになるだろう。

    ■未知の感染症が意外な地域まで広がる

    9:グローバル化する感染症
     地球温暖化で生態系が変化すると、病原菌はこれまでと異なる地域でも生き延びる。蚊が媒介する感染症はいまはまだ熱帯地域に限定されているが、温暖化によって、熱帯域は10年に50キロメートル弱の勢いで拡大している。熱帯の境界とともに蚊も北に移動している。

     気候と感染症の関係でたしかなことは、暑い地域ほどウイルスは活発になるということだ。現状の気温上昇ペースをもとに、世界銀行は2030年には36億人がマラリアの危険にさらされると予測する。

    10:経済崩壊が世界を揺るがす
     比較的温暖な地域では、平均気温が1℃上昇すると経済成長が1パーセント抑えられるという研究結果がある。経済生産性に最適な気温は、年平均13℃との計算もある。アメリカをはじめとする世界の経済大国が、現在ちょうどそのぐらいの気温だが、気温の上昇により生産性も下がる。

     同じ研究者たちによれば、パリ協定の現状の国別目標を達成して、気温上昇の幅が2.5~3℃になった場合、今世紀末の1人当たりの経済生産高は15~25パーセント減少するという。4℃なら、経済生産高は30パーセント減るだろう。世界を大不況が襲い、ファシズムや権威主義の台頭を許し、大虐殺を招いた1930年代の2倍の落ち込みとなる。

    11:気候戦争の勃発
     気温と暴力の関係を数値化する研究によると、平均気温が0.5℃上がるごとに、武力衝突の危険性は10~20パーセント高くなるという。平均気温が4℃上昇した世界では、戦争の数が2倍になる。

     戦争は世界の平均気温の上昇と直結はしていなくても、気候変動がもたらす不安や連鎖反応が総計された最悪の展開であることはたしかだ。

    ■2050年までに2憶人の気候難民が発生? 

    12:大規模な気候難民
     国連が発表した数字では、温暖化の現状がこのまま続けば、2050年までに2億人の気候難民が発生するという。国際移住機関(IOM)は、最大10億人の難民を生むと主張する。

     難民は、国家破綻の問題と思われがちだが、ハリケーン・ハービーではテキサス州で少なくとも6万人の気候難民が生まれ、ハリケーン・イルマでは700万人近くが避難した。2100年には、アメリカでは海面の上昇だけで1300万人が住むところを失うことになるだろう。

     海面上昇にしろ、食料不足や経済不振にしろ、現実にはそれぞれの要素が打ち消し合うこともあれば、反対に強め合うこともある。すべてが複雑にからみあって環境危機となり、人間はそのなかで生きていかねばならない。

     個人的には、暗澹(あんたん)たる未来図を見せられたほうがやる気をかきたてられる。それは団結して行動せよという号令であり、またそうあるべきだと思う。地球という星はすべての人のふるさとであり、そこに選択の余地はない。しかし、どんな行動を起こすかは一人ひとりの手にかかっている。

    デイビッド・ウォレス・ウェルズ :新アメリカ研究機構ナショナル・フェロー

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.