Soo Kim

Sweden’s death rate is more than twice as high as that of the U.S. (around 5.8 percent), the current epicenter of the outbreak which has the highest death toll in the world, and of China (around 5.5 percent), where the virus was first reported in the city of Wuhan.
The country has sparked controversy for its seemingly relaxed approach to combating the pandemic by surprisingly choosing not to impose a nationwide lockdown, while many of its European neighbors, including across Scandinavia, have done so.
The country has reported more than 21,000 confirmed cases, including nearly 2,500 fatalities. Its death rate is nearly six times as high as that of Norway (nearly 2.6 percent) and nearly triple that of its other Scandinavian neighbors Finland (nearly 4.2 percent) and Denmark (nearly 4.9 percent).
The death rate in Iran (nearly 6.3 percent), which once had the highest death toll outside China, is nearly half that of Sweden.
Sweden also has more than double the number of confirmed cases as Denmark, nearly triple that of Norway and over four times as many as Finland.

This entry was posted in attitude. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Soo Kim

  1. shinichi says:

    SWEDEN’S CORONAVIRUS DEATH RATE NEARLY TWICE THAT OF U.S. AS TRUMP SAYS COUNTRY ‘PAYING HEAVILY’ FOR NOT HAVING LOCKDOWN

    by Soo Kim

    https://www.newsweek.com/sweden-coronavirus-rate-1501250

    Cases of the novel coronavirus continue to rise in Sweden, which has a death rate of over 12 percent, the sixth highest in the world among countries with more than 1,000 confirmed cases, as of Thursday, according to the latest figures from Johns Hopkins University.

    Sweden’s death rate is more than twice as high as that of the U.S. (around 5.8 percent), the current epicenter of the outbreak which has the highest death toll in the world, and of China (around 5.5 percent), where the virus was first reported in the city of Wuhan.

    The country has sparked controversy for its seemingly relaxed approach to combating the pandemic by surprisingly choosing not to impose a nationwide lockdown, while many of its European neighbors, including across Scandinavia, have done so.

    On Thursday, President Donald Trump noted the country was “paying heavily” for its decision. “Despite reports to the contrary, Sweden is paying heavily for its decision not to lockdown. As of today, 2462 people have died there, a much higher number than the neighboring countries of Norway (207), Finland (206) or Denmark (443). The United States made the correct decision!,” Trump said in a post Thursday morning on his official Twitter account.

    The country has reported more than 21,000 confirmed cases, including nearly 2,500 fatalities. Its death rate is nearly six times as high as that of Norway (nearly 2.6 percent) and nearly triple that of its other Scandinavian neighbors Finland (nearly 4.2 percent) and Denmark (nearly 4.9 percent).

    The death rate in Iran (nearly 6.3 percent), which once had the highest death toll outside China, is nearly half that of Sweden.

    Sweden also has more than double the number of confirmed cases as Denmark, nearly triple that of Norway and over four times as many as Finland.

    Donald J. Trump
    @realDonaldTrump
    Despite reports to the contrary, Sweden is paying heavily for its decision not to lockdown. As of today, 2462 people have died there, a much higher number than the neighboring countries of Norway (207), Finland (206) or Denmark (443). The United States made the correct decision!

    There have been virtually no new recoveries from infection reported in Sweden throughout the outbreak, apart from a few dates in April, including a spike on April 25 when it has 455 new recoveries. But new cases have continued to rise from around early March, reaching 681 on Wednesday, according to figures from the Public Health Agency of Sweden.

    Sweden’s radical response to the outbreak is said to be part of the country’s strategy to establish herd immunity by increasing the number of people exposed to the virus in a bid to prevent another wave of cases.

    “At least 50 percent of our death toll is within elderly homes and we have a hard time understanding how a lockdown would stop the introduction of disease,” Anders Tegnell, the chief state epidemiologist at Sweden’s public health agency, told the BBC’s Radio Four’s Today program last week.

    The decision to not issue a lockdown “worked in some aspects because our health system has been able to cope,” he noted.

    Tegnell also claimed last week that up to 20 percent of residents in the Swedish capital, Stockholm, have been infected with the virus, noting “We believe that we have an immunity level, if I remember rightly, somewhere between 15-20 percent of the population in Stockholm,” he told CNBC.

    “This is not complete herd immunity but it will definitely affect the reproduction rate and slow down the spread (of a second wave),” he said.

    Speaking to Newsweek, Peter Nilsson, a professor of internal medicine-epidemiology at Lund University, said earlier this week: “My personal view is that a temporary, local lockdown in severely affected areas could be one option if needed (and the government/parliament has passed a law to allow for such a decision), but still we are not there. The health care sector is strained but not overwhelmed. There are still extra capacities and a full reserve hospital in Stockholm not being used yet.”

    He added that “the situation in Stockholm is not improving, but still at a plateau phase,” noting that Swedish authorities have recommended strict social distancing measures and residents are being told to stay home if they show symptoms of the virus.

    Restaurants risk being closed by authorities if social distancing guidelines are not followed, such as having more guests in the venue than allowed, while social gatherings of 50 people or more are banned, Nilsson notes.

    “Of special importance is also to protect the economy and avoid close-downs and widespread unemployment if possible, as otherwise the secondary damage done by the pandemic may kill many people or impact on reduced health care resources in the future,” he added.

    The country’s unconventional approach has faced criticism from some Swedish health experts, including Cecilia Soderberg-Naucler, a professor of microbial pathogenesis at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden.

    Soderberg-Naucler is among the nearly 2,300 academics who last month signed an open letter to the government urging it to introduce stronger measures to protect the country’s health care system.

    “My concern is things [the outbreak] are going too fast,” Soderberg-Naucler said to Radio Sweden last week, noting that the country was too slow to react when the virus was first brought to the country by residents who traveled to higher risk areas, including to the Italian Alps and Iran.

    “We don’t have a choice, we have to close Stockholm right now. We must establish control over the situation, we cannot head into a situation where we get complete chaos. No one has tried this route [of not imposing a lockdown], so why should we test it first in Sweden, without informed consent?” she told Reuters earlier this month.

    As cases continue to grow in Sweden, schools for those under 16 remain open, while high schools and universities have closed and their courses are being taught online.

    Residents are allowed to visit shops as normal, while restaurants, bars, cafes and nightclubs have reportedly been told to offer seated table service only.

    The novel coronavirus has spread to more than 3.2 million people across at least 186 countries and regions. Over 992,500 have recovered from infection, while more than 228,700 have died, as of Thursday.

    The graphic below, provided by Statista, illustrates countries with the most confirmed COVID-19 cases.

  2. shinichi says:

    「集団免疫」作戦のスウェーデンに異変、死亡率がアメリカや中国の2倍超に

    by スー・キム

    翻訳:森美歩

    ニューズウィーク日本版

    https://headlines.yahoo.co.jp/article?a=20200501-00010007-newsweek-int&p=1

    <より多くの人をウイルスにさらすことで集団免疫を獲得する、というスウェーデンだけの「人体実験」には国内から反対も出始めている>

    ロックダウンに頼らない独特の新型コロナウイルス対策で知られるスウェーデンで、感染者が増え続けている。しかも米ジョンズ・ホプキンズ大学の集計によれば、死亡率は4月30日時点で12%超。これは、感染者が1000人を超える国の中で6番目に高い割合で、現在の感染拡大の中心地で死者数も最多のアメリカ(約5.8%)、ウイルスの発生源とされる武漢市がある中国(約5.5%)と比べても2倍以上の高さだ。

    新型コロナウイルスの感染拡大を抑える対策としては、北欧諸国も含むヨーロッパの多くの国が全国的な封鎖措置を取り、厳しい移動規制を敷いている。こうしたなか、スウェーデンは全国的な移動規制や外出制限をしないという独自路線を貫いており、ストックホルムの通りの人でもカフェの客入りも一見、普段通りだ。その「緩い」対策は、世界的にも論議を呼んできた。

    ドナルド・トランプ米大統領は4月30日朝、公式アカウントにツイートを投稿。この中で「封鎖措置を取らなかったスウェーデンは、その決定の手痛い代償を払っている」と指摘。「同国では30日の時点で、死者数が2462人にのぼっている。近隣のノルウェー(207人)、フィンランド(206人)やデンマーク(443人)よりもずっと多い。アメリカは正しい決断を下したのだ!」と主張した。

    <「集団免疫」戦略の効果は>

    スウェーデンはこれまでに2万1000人近くが新型コロナウイルスに感染したと報告しており、このうち2500人近くが死亡している。感染者の死亡率はノルウェー(約2.6%)の6倍近く、同じ北欧のフィンランド(約4.2%)やデンマーク(約4.9%)と比べても3倍近くにのぼる。かつて中国以外で最も高かったイランの感染者死亡率(約6.3%)も、スウェーデンの半分ぐらいだ。感染者数を見ても、スウェーデンの感染者数はデンマークの2倍以上、ノルウェーの3倍近くで、フィンランドの4倍以上に達している。

    感染者の回復状況も思わしくなさそうだ。スウェーデンは4月に何度か感染者の回復を報告しており、最も多かった25日には一気に455人が回復したと発表しているが、それ以外の報告はない。その一方で、感染拡大が始まった3月上旬から、新たな新規の感染者の数は増え続けており、同国の公衆衛生当局によれば4月29日には新たに681人の感染が確認された。

    新型コロナウイルスの感染拡大に対するスウェーデン独自の対策は、ウイルスにさらされる人の数を増やすことで「集団免疫」を形成し、感染拡大の第2波を防ぐという作戦の一環だとされている。

    スウェーデン公衆衛生局の疫学者であるアンダース・テグネルは4月下旬にBBCラジオの番組に出演し、「我が国の死者のうち少なくとも半数は、高齢者施設の中で集団感染した人々だ。封鎖をすれば感染拡大を阻止できる、という考え方は理解しがたい」と主張。スウェーデンの方法は「ある意味で功を奏している。私たちの医療システムが崩壊に追い込まれていないことがその証拠だ」と述べた。

    対策強化を求める声も

    テグネルは4月21日、米CNBCの番組にも出演。スウェーデンの首都ストックホルムの住民のうち、最大20%が新型コロナウイルスに感染したことがあると述べ、「ストックホルムの人口の15~20%が既に免疫を獲得していると確信している」と主張。「これは完全な集団免疫ではないが、ウイルスの再増殖を抑制し、感染の(第2波が訪れる)スピードを抑える効果はあるだろう」と述べた。

    ルンド大学(スウェーデン)のピーター・ニルソン教授(内科医学・感染学)は4月下旬、本誌に次のように語った。「個人的には、必要であれば(そして地元の政府や議会でそれを可能にする法律が可決されれば)感染者の特に多い地域を封鎖するのもひとつの選択肢だと考えている。だが我々は、まだその段階には達していないと思う。医療部門には大きなストレスがかかっているが、手一杯の状態ではない。まだ余力があり、ストックホルムにある臨時病院もまだ使っていない」

    ニルソンはさらに「ストックホルムの状況はまだ改善には向かっていないが、安定が続いている」とも指摘。またスウェーデン当局は、市民にはソーシャル・ディスタンシング(社会的距離の確保)を推奨しており、感染の症状が出たら自宅にとどまるよう勧告していると述べた。

    <学者たちは「今すぐ首都封鎖を」>

    スウェーデンではソーシャル・ディスタンシングが守られなかった場合(たとえば店の中に一定数を超える客を入れたなど)、当局がレストランに閉鎖を命じる可能性があり、50人以上の集会は禁止されているとニルソンは説明し、さらにこう続けた。「経済を守り、可能な限り店舗閉鎖や従業員の解雇を回避することも重要だ。そうしなければ、ウイルスのパンデミック(世界的な大流行)がもたらす二次的なダメージによって多くの人が死ぬことになるか、医療に必要なリソースが減ってしまう可能性がある」

    異例の対策には、国内の一部専門家から批判の声も上がっている。カロリンスカ研究所のセシリア・セーデルベリ・ナウクレル教授(微生物病因)もそのひとりだ。

    彼女をはじめとする2300人近い学者たちは3月末、政府宛の公開書簡に署名。医療システムを守るために、もっと厳しい対策を導入するよう求めた。「感染があまりに速いペースで拡大していることが心配だ」と、彼女は今週ラジオ番組の中で語り、感染者の多い地域(イタリアのアルプスやイラン)から帰国した市民が最初にウイルスを国内に持ち込んだ時の、政府の対応が遅すぎたと批判した。

    彼女はさらに4月に入ってから、ロイター通信にこう語っている。「今すぐストックホルムを封鎖する以外に選択肢はない。国が完全な混乱状態に陥ることがないように、状況をコントロールすることが必要だ。外出制限をしないという方法は、これまで誰も試していない。それなのになぜ、国民の同意なしに、スウェーデンが初めてその方法を試さなければならないのか」

    スウェーデンでは、高校や大学は閉鎖されてオンライン授業になっているが、16歳未満の子どもたちは今も学校に通っている。レストランやバー、カフェやナイトクラブも着席スタイルのサービスは許されており、買い物は普段どおりにできる。

    新型コロナウイルスは4月30日時点で世界の少なくとも186カ国・地域に広まっており、感染者は320万人を超えている。感染後に回復した人は99万2500人を上回り、死者数は22万8700人以上にのぼっている。

  3. shinichi says:

    (sk)

    若い人は死なない。スウェーデンのように希望する人だけを隔離して、他の人はみんな普通の暮らしをすればいい。

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.