Karl Mehta

Everything that can be automated has been automated. The fourth industrial revolution is upon us, with the forces of AI, robotics, and 3D printing disrupting the status quo and pushing outdated processes into oblivion. The Ford factory workers’ jobs have largely been turned over to machines.
But the workforce training process hasn’t kept up with the pace of change.
The education that the workforce received was designed in the previous industrial age: front-loaded for first 20 years, and expected to apply to their jobs for the next 40 to 50 years. Today, we are in the knowledge economy, and there is new knowledge we are required to learn and apply daily. How can we future-proof our workforces to help them prepare for the rapid pace of business transformation?

2 thoughts on “Karl Mehta

  1. shinichi Post author

    In a knowledge economy corporate learning is necessary to survive

    by Karl Mehta

    https://techcrunch.com/2016/10/30/in-a-knowledge-economy-corporate-learning-is-necessary-to-survive/

    If you were an employee on Henry Ford’s assembly line in Detroit in the 1920s, you received a high degree of training and preparation before you ever set foot in the factory. You learned what your role was, and were given all the tools you needed to accomplish your job from Day One. From then on, your role never changed—you did your part to move a product forward along the assembly line, from the day you began until the day you retired, 40 or 50 years later.

    Since those days, the business world has transformed — everything that can be automated has been automated. The fourth industrial revolution is upon us, with the forces of AI, robotics, and 3D printing disrupting the status quo and pushing outdated processes into oblivion. The Ford factory workers’ jobs have largely been turned over to machines.

    But the workforce training process hasn’t kept up with the pace of change.

    The education that the workforce received was designed in the previous industrial age: front-loaded for first 20 years, and expected to apply to their jobs for the next 40 to 50 years. Today, we are in the knowledge economy, and there is new knowledge we are required to learn and apply daily. How can we future-proof our workforces to help them prepare for the rapid pace of business transformation?

    The return on not investing in the knowledge economy

    The pace of change is surpassing enterprises’ ability to keep up. They’re not adopting new technologies fast enough, and they aren’t investing in the resources that can help them grow. While they may have capable employees, their teams don’t have expertise in the fields that will drive their businesses forward.

    They’re not investing in enterprise-wide knowledge — and while many business leaders push against investing in L&D programs because they’re not clear on the ROI, it’s imperative that they begin thinking about the negative return on not investing (RONI).

    The grim result? Extinction. A study by Washington University predicts that 40% of Fortune 500 companies on the S&P 500 today will not exist ten years from now.

    “If the rate of change on the outside exceeds the rate of change on the inside, the end is near.”

    Jack Welch, former CEO, GE

    The solution: An infrastructure of knowledge on tap

    The future of the corporate workforce lies in building a knowledge network. This kind of learning reflects our already mobile, changeable world. It recognizes that people today learn as much from their peers online and in person as they do from books and seminars. It creates a culture of knowledge-sharing that develops these tech-savvy learners to their full potential.

    Kevin Oakes, CEO of the Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp), has concluded based on extensive research of top performing companies that high-performance organizations rely much more (4x) on knowledge-sharing than do low-performing organizations.

    The successful organizations in this network and knowledge age recognize the relationship between learning and performance: AT&T recently told its employees to update their skills in five to ten hours weekly of online learning or they “will obsolete themselves with the technology.”

    Reply
  2. shinichi Post author

    知識経済の中での生き残りには、企業内教育が鍵だ

    Karl Mehta

    http://jp.techcrunch.com/2016/10/31/20161030in-a-knowledge-economy-corporate-learning-is-necessary-to-survive/

    もしあなたが1920年代にデトロイトのヘンリー・フォードの組立ラインの従業員であったなら、工場に足を踏み入れる前には既に高いレベルの訓練と準備が整っていた筈だ。自分の役割が何であるかを学び、初日から仕事を完遂するために必要なツールを与えられていた。そしてその先、あなたの役割は変化せず、組立ラインに沿って製品を流す際の自分の役割を果たすのだ。仕事を始めたときから、40年か50年後に退職する日まで。

    その当時から、ビジネスの世界は変化を重ねてきた。自動化出来るものは全て自動化されて来ている。第4産業革命が私たちに迫っている。AI、ロボット、そして3Dプリントと共に現状を破壊し、時代遅れのプロセスを忘却の淵に追いやっているのだ。フォード工場の労働者の仕事は、その大部分が機械化された。

    しかし、労働力のトレーニングプロセスは、変化のペースに追いついていない。

    従業員が受けた教育は、以前の工業化時代に設計されたものだ:最初の20年間に学校教育を受け、そしてその後40から50年間に渡って、それぞれの仕事に適用することが期待されている。今日、私たちは知識経済の中にいる。そして日々学び適用しなければならない新しい知識に晒されている。どのようにすれば、私たちの労働力を、未来に向けて自分自身で迅速なビジネスの変化に対応できるようにすることができるのだろうか?

    知識経済に投資しない場合のリターン

    変化のペースは、企業がキャッチアップできる能力を超えつつある。新しいテクノロジーを十分に速く採用せず、彼らを成長させることを助ける資源に対しての投資も行っていない。能力の高い従業員はいるかもしれないが、彼らのチームは事業を推進するための、その分野での専門知識を持っていない。

    彼らは企業全体を覆う知識に投資していない — そして多くのビジネスリーダーたちが、ROIへの貢献がはっきりしないという理由でL&Dプログラムへの投資に反対しているが、いまや投資しないことによる負のリターン(RONI=Return On Not Investing)を考え始めなければならないのだ。

    残酷な結末は?絶滅だ。ワシントン大学の研究による予想では、現在S&P500上に載っているフォーチュン500企業の40パーセントは10年後には存在していない。

    「外部の変化率が内部の変化率を超えた場合、終わりは近い」。

    ジャック・ウェルチ、GE元CEO

    解決策:知識の蛇口のためのインフラストラクチャ

    企業の従業員の将来は知識ネットワークの構築にかかっている。この種の学習は、既に私たちのモバイルで変化する世界を反映している。今日の人びとは、本やセミナーから学ぶように、オンラインや直接対面で他者から学ぶことがわかってきた。それは、ハイテクに精通した学習者をその可能性の限界まで引き上げる、知識共有の文化を創出するのだ。

    Institute for Corporate Productivity(i4cp;企業生産性研究所)のCEOKevin Oakesは、高生産性を達成している企業に対する詳細な研究の結果、高生産性企業は低生産性の組織と比べてはるかに高い(4倍)知識共有を実現しているという結論を述べている。

    このネットワークと知識の時代の中で、成功した組織は、学習とパフォーマンスの関連を認識している:AT&Tが最近発表したところによれば、同社の従業員たちは毎週5から10時間のオンライン学習でスキルをアップデートしているそうだ、そうしなければ「自分自身を技術的に時代遅れにしてしまう」からだ。

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.