Joy Harjo

For me, poetry is a way to speak when you have no words.

There’s always a poem out there that can change your life.

We’re here. We’re poets, we’re jazz musicians, we’re teachers. We’re human beings.

Those moments that are the most terrifying, empowering, grief-filled, joy-filled, they are always accompanied by poetry.

3 thoughts on “Joy Harjo

  1. shinichi Post author

    Joy Harjo

    ジョイ・ハルジョ

    For me, poetry is a way to speak when you have no words.
    私にとって詩とは、言葉が見つからないときに話す方法なのです。

    There’s always a poem out there that can change your life.
    人生を変える詩が常にあります。

    We’re here. We’re poets, we’re jazz musicians, we’re teachers. We’re human beings.
    私たちはここにいる。私たちは詩人で、ジャズミュージシャンで、教師だ。私たちは人間だ。

    Those moments that are the most terrifying, empowering, grief-filled, joy-filled, they are always accompanied by poetry.
    最も恐ろしい時、自信に満ちている時、悲しみに満ちている時、喜びに満ちている時、そこには必ず詩があります。

    In many Indigenous cultures, poets are also known as healers.
    多くの先住民文化では、詩人は治癒者としても知られている。

    Poetry belongs to everyone. It doesn’t just belong sitting on a shelf in a university.
    詩はみんなのもの。大学の棚に置かれているだけではありません。

    Do you know how to make a peaceful road
    Through human memory?
    And what of angry ghosts of history?

    穏やかな道のつくり方を知っていますか?
    人間の記憶をたどって
    でも怒れる歴史の亡霊は?

    I begin with the seed of an emotion, a place, and then move from there. … I no longer see the poem as an ending point, perhaps more the end of a journey, an often long journey that can begin years earlier, say with the blur of the memory of the sun on someone’s cheek, a certain smell, an ache, and will culminate years later in a poem, sifted through a point, a lake in my heart through which language must come.
    私の場合は、感情や場所の種からスタートして、そこから移動していきます。もはや詩が終着点だとは思わなくなりました。それはどちらかというと旅。例えば、誰かの頬に当たる太陽、ある匂い、痛みなどのぼんやりした記憶を伴う何年もの長い旅。それが長い間経ってから、私の心の中にある一点、つまり言葉が入って来なければならない湖でふるいにかけられ凝縮していき、やがて一編の詩として結実するのです。

    Reply
  2. shinichi Post author

    U.S. poet Joy Harjo: ‘There’s a poem out there that can change your life’

    by ShareAmerica

    https://share.america.gov/us-poet-joy-harjo-poem-can-change-your-life/

    After a period of pandemic and racial tension, U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo finds comfort and lessons in poetry.

    “Those moments that are the most terrifying, empowering, grief-filled, joy-filled, they are always accompanied by poetry,” Harjo said in an interview with the Library of Congress, where she is serving her third term as poet laureate. “There’s always a poem out there that can change your life.”

    Harjo, a member of the Muskogee Creek Nation, is the first Native American to serve as the country’s official poet.

    When appointing Harjo, Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden said: “To her, poems are ‘carriers of dreams, knowledge and wisdom,’ and through them she tells an American story of tradition and loss, reckoning and myth-making.”

    Harjo points out that in many Indigenous cultures, poets are also known as healers. Poetry helps her deal with the frustrations of lingering disregard for Native American culture. “For me, poetry is a way to speak when you have no words,” she said during a National Book Festival panel about race in America.

    Proud of her heritage, Harjo said she started writing poetry as part of her work advocating for Native rights.

    It’s important to her that people know that Native Americans aren’t extinct but still contribute to American culture. A signature project of hers as poet laureate, “Living Nations, Living Words,” is an interactive map that allows readers to click on a location and learn about a Native poet from that area. (You can find Harjo under Tulsa, Oklahoma, but dozens of other poets are included as well.)

    “We’re here. We’re poets, we’re jazz musicians, we’re teachers. We’re human beings,” said Harjo, who turns 71 this year. Harjo herself is not just a poet but a musician, a memoirist and, she proudly notes, a great-grandmother.

    She has won awards for her writing and for her music. She plays saxophone and sings and is a member of a band called Arrow Dynamics. Most of the world’s poetry, she notes, is part of oral traditions, including music.

    Harjo hopes to bring her enthusiasm for poetry to others. “Poetry belongs to everyone. It doesn’t just belong sitting on a shelf in a university.”

    At the book festival event, wearing turquoise jewelry and impossibly long beaded earrings set against her jet-black hair, she read from her poem “Exile of Memory” about going back to Muscogee lands in the Southeast that were home before the members were forced out to Oklahoma.

    “Do you know how to make a peaceful road
    Through human memory?
    And what of angry ghosts of history?”

    In her interview with Laura Coltelli, in the book Winged Words: American Indian Writers Speak, Harjo says: “I begin with the seed of an emotion, a place, and then move from there. … I no longer see the poem as an ending point, perhaps more the end of a journey, an often long journey that can begin years earlier, say with the blur of the memory of the sun on someone’s cheek, a certain smell, an ache, and will culminate years later in a poem, sifted through a point, a lake in my heart through which language must come.”

    Reply
  3. shinichi Post author

    人生を変える詩 ― 詩人ジョイ・ハルジョ

    アメリカン・ビュー(在日米国大使館 公式マガジン)

    https://amview.japan.usembassy.gov/us-poet-joy-harjo-theres-a-poem-out-there-that-can-change-your-life/

    パンデミックや人種間の敵対意識など、さまざまな問題が起きたこの1年、米国桂冠詩人コンサルタントを務めたジョイ・ハルジョは、詩に心の安らぎと教訓を見出します。

    「最も恐ろしい時、自信に満ちている時、悲しみに満ちている時、喜びに満ちている時、そこには必ず詩があります」。米国議会図書館のインタビューでハルジョはこう語りました。「人生を変える詩が常にあります」

    マスコギー・クリーク族の一員であるハルジョは、公式に米国の詩人を務める初の米国先住民です。

    カーラ・ヘイデン米議会図書館長は、ハルジョを任命する際に次のように述べています。「彼女にとって、詩は『夢、知識、知恵を運ぶもの』。彼女は詩を通し、米国の伝統と喪失、過去の過ちへの審判と神話化の物語を語っているのです」

    多くの先住民文化では、詩人は治癒者としても知られているとハルジョは指摘します。先住民族の文化が無視され続けていることへの不満を、彼女は詩で解消しています。「私にとって詩とは、言葉が見つからないときに話す方法なのです」。米国の人種について行われた「ナショナル・ブック・フェスティバル」の討論会で彼女はこう述べました。

    自分の伝統を誇りに思い、先住民の権利を擁護する活動の一環として詩を書き始めたとハルジョは言います。

    彼女にとって重要なのは、米国の先住民は絶滅したわけでなく、今も米国文化に貢献していると人々に知ってもらうことです。桂冠詩人としての彼女の代表的なプロジェクト「Living Nations, Living Words」は、地図上をクリックすると、その地域の先住民詩人について知ることができるインタラクティブなマップサイトです(オクラホマ州タルサをクリックするとハルジョの詩を読むことができます。他にも数十人の詩人が含まれています)。

    「私たちはここにいる。私たちは詩人で、ジャズミュージシャンで、教師だ。私たちは人間だ」と、今年70歳になるハルジョは言います。ハルジョ自身も、詩人であると同時に、ミュージシャン、回想録作家であり、さらには曾祖母でもあると誇らしげに語ります。

    ハルジョは執筆活動や音楽活動でも受賞歴があります。また、サキソフォンを演奏し歌も歌う「アロー・ダイナミクス」というバンドのメンバーでもあります。世界の詩のほとんどは、音楽を含め口頭伝承の一部だと彼女は指摘します。

    ハルジョは、詩に対する自らの情熱を他の人にも伝えたいと考えています。「詩はみんなのもの。大学の棚に置かれているだけではありません」

    ブックフェスティバルのイベントに参加したハルジョは、トルコ石のジュエリーを身につけ、漆黒の髪にありえないほど長いビーズのイヤリングをつけて自作の詩を読み上げました。部族がオクラホマに追いやられる前、故郷であった南東部のマスコギー族の土地に戻ることをテーマにした「Exile of Memory(記憶の流刑)」です。

    穏やかな道のつくり方を知っていますか?
    人間の記憶をたどって
    でも怒れる歴史の亡霊は?

    ローラ・コルテッリ著「Winged Words: American Indian Writers(翼のある言葉―米国先住民作家の話」」という本の中にハルジョとのインタビューがあります。彼女はこう語ります。「私の場合は、感情や場所の種からスタートして、そこから移動していきます。もはや詩が終着点だとは思わなくなりました。それはどちらかというと旅。例えば、誰かの頬に当たる太陽、ある匂い、痛みなどのぼんやりした記憶を伴う何年もの長い旅。それが長い間経ってから、私の心の中にある一点、つまり言葉が入って来なければならない湖でふるいにかけられ凝縮していき、やがて一編の詩として結実するのです」

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.